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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 150
Doc. 143. President Lincoln's speech, on leaving Home for Washington, Feb. 11, 1861. Mr. Lincoln left Springfield, Ill., at half-past 7 A. M., accompanied to the depot by a large concourse of citizens. About one thousand persons were collected at the depot, and after he had shaken hands with a number of friends, he spoke as follows: my friends: No one, not in my position, can appreciate the sadness I feel at this parting. To this people I owe all that I am. Here I have lived more than a quarter of a century; here my children were born, and here one of them lies buried. I know not how soon I shall see you again. A duty devolves upon me which is, perhaps, greater than that which has devolved upon any other man since the days of Washington. He never could have succeeded except for the aid of Divine Providence, upon which he at all times relied. I feel that I cannot succeed without the same Divine aid which sustained him; and in the same Almighty being I place my reliance fo
Springfield (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 150
Doc. 143. President Lincoln's speech, on leaving Home for Washington, Feb. 11, 1861. Mr. Lincoln left Springfield, Ill., at half-past 7 A. M., accompanied to the depot by a large concourse of citizens. About one thousand persons were collected at the depot, and after he had shaken hands with a number of friends, he spoke as follows: my friends: No one, not in my position, can appreciate the sadness I feel at this parting. To this people I owe all that I am. Here I have lived more than a quarter of a century; here my children were born, and here one of them lies buried. I know not how soon I shall see you again. A duty devolves upon me which is, perhaps, greater than that which has devolved upon any other man since the days of Washington. He never could have succeeded except for the aid of Divine Providence, upon which he at all times relied. I feel that I cannot succeed without the same Divine aid which sustained him; and in the same Almighty being I place my reliance f
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 150
Doc. 143. President Lincoln's speech, on leaving Home for Washington, Feb. 11, 1861. Mr. Lincoln left Springfield, Ill., at half-past 7 A. M., accompanied to the depot by a large concourse of citizens. About one thousand persons were collected at the depot, and after he had shaken hands with a number of friends, he spoke as Mr. Lincoln left Springfield, Ill., at half-past 7 A. M., accompanied to the depot by a large concourse of citizens. About one thousand persons were collected at the depot, and after he had shaken hands with a number of friends, he spoke as follows: my friends: No one, not in my position, can appreciate the sadness I feel at this parting. To this people I owe all that I am. Here I have lived more than a quarter of a century; here my children were born, and here one of them lies buried. I know not how soon I shall see you again. A duty devolves upon me which is, ng I place my reliance for support, and I hope you, my friends, will all pray that I may receive that Divine assistance, without which I cannot succeed, but with which, success is certain. Again, I bid you all an affectionate farewell. During the speech, Mr. Lincoln betrayed much emotion, and the crowd was affected to tears.
John A. Washington (search for this): chapter 150
the depot, and after he had shaken hands with a number of friends, he spoke as follows: my friends: No one, not in my position, can appreciate the sadness I feel at this parting. To this people I owe all that I am. Here I have lived more than a quarter of a century; here my children were born, and here one of them lies buried. I know not how soon I shall see you again. A duty devolves upon me which is, perhaps, greater than that which has devolved upon any other man since the days of Washington. He never could have succeeded except for the aid of Divine Providence, upon which he at all times relied. I feel that I cannot succeed without the same Divine aid which sustained him; and in the same Almighty being I place my reliance for support, and I hope you, my friends, will all pray that I may receive that Divine assistance, without which I cannot succeed, but with which, success is certain. Again, I bid you all an affectionate farewell. During the speech, Mr. Lincoln betrayed
Doc. 143. President Lincoln's speech, on leaving Home for Washington, Feb. 11, 1861. Mr. Lincoln left Springfield, Ill., at half-past 7 A. M., accompanied to the depot by a large concourse of citizens. About one thousand persons were collected at the depot, and after he had shaken hands with a number of friends, he spoke as follows: my friends: No one, not in my position, can appreciate the sadness I feel at this parting. To this people I owe all that I am. Here I have lived more than a quarter of a century; here my children were born, and here one of them lies buried. I know not how soon I shall see you again. A duty devolves upon me which is, perhaps, greater than that which has devolved upon any other man since the days of Washington. He never could have succeeded except for the aid of Divine Providence, upon which he at all times relied. I feel that I cannot succeed without the same Divine aid which sustained him; and in the same Almighty being I place my reliance f
February 11th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 150
Doc. 143. President Lincoln's speech, on leaving Home for Washington, Feb. 11, 1861. Mr. Lincoln left Springfield, Ill., at half-past 7 A. M., accompanied to the depot by a large concourse of citizens. About one thousand persons were collected at the depot, and after he had shaken hands with a number of friends, he spoke as follows: my friends: No one, not in my position, can appreciate the sadness I feel at this parting. To this people I owe all that I am. Here I have lived more than a quarter of a century; here my children were born, and here one of them lies buried. I know not how soon I shall see you again. A duty devolves upon me which is, perhaps, greater than that which has devolved upon any other man since the days of Washington. He never could have succeeded except for the aid of Divine Providence, upon which he at all times relied. I feel that I cannot succeed without the same Divine aid which sustained him; and in the same Almighty being I place my reliance f