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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 151
ark for us all. And if from this I turn to the field of literature or science, where, I ask, is there a great name in England which is not equally venerated in America? It was but the other day that I took a little trip to the banks of your little river Avon, to visit the birthplace and the last resting place of your great poet, and there I found on the record of the pilgrims who go to that shrine that a great proportion are from America. (Cheers.) So, among philosophers we know no greater guide than Bacon, in science no higher authority than Newton; and if I may be permitted to come down to the limits of your own municipality of London, there is not a omen as it has done of her own. And perhaps I may be permitted here to make an allusion to a higher character, so far as to say that through the breadth of the United States, from sea to sea, the name of her Majesty the Queen is held in the highest honor,--(cheers)--not because she is a queen — no, that's not the reason, for there
France (France) (search for this): chapter 151
ill take the liberty to notice as having happened to the diplomacy of nations. Not a great while ago, it had the reputation of being tricky and false — of taking advantage of the secrecy with which it was conducted to play an unfair game. The history of the past is filled with examples of eminent men who considered it the height of merit to show skill in outwitting their neighbors in negotiation. Indeed, there is an anecdote told of a very distinguished public character of the last age in France — I know not with what justice — that such was the reputation he had obtained as an adept in deception at one part of his life, that from that time he made up his mind always to tell the truth, being confident nobody would ever think of believing him, and that thus he might the better conceal his objects. (A laugh.) Be this as it may, I prefer to appeal from the old example of Prince Talleyrand to the later one of a veteran diplomatist of your own country, who, after serving a long career o<
Guildhall (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
. Saturday, Nov. 9th, being Lord Mayor's day, conformably with a custom which had obtained for more than six hundred years, Alderman Cubitt went in state from Guildhall, London, to Westminster, attended by members of the Court of Aldermen, all the principal officers of the Corporation, and representatives of most, if not all, ofn addition to the interest which, in the popular estimation, has always been peculiarly its own. As usual, the chief interest of the occasion at first centred in Guildhall, with its precincts, as the place from which the procession was to start. About twelve o'clock, the procession, marshalled according to order, moved off on its ith their chaplains, each in a splendid chariot, drawn by four horses. The Lord Mayor having been sworn in, the accustomed inaugural entertainment took place in Guildhall in the evening, which was appropriately decorated for the occasion, under the tasteful direction of Mr. J. B. Bunning, architect to the City of London. The corr
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 151
and vastly higher particulars in which we harmonize. (Cheers.) Surely it must be remembered that, with only the exception of the last eighty years, we claim to be joint heritors with you in all that is great and noble in your past history. Every bold stroke for liberty, whether civil or religious, is matter of pride for us as it is for you. Magna Charta is a common landmark for us all. And if from this I turn to the field of literature or science, where, I ask, is there a great name in England which is not equally venerated in America? It was but the other day that I took a little trip to the banks of your little river Avon, to visit the birthplace and the last resting place of your great poet, and there I found on the record of the pilgrims who go to that shrine that a great proportion are from America. (Cheers.) So, among philosophers we know no greater guide than Bacon, in science no higher authority than Newton; and if I may be permitted to come down to the limits of your o
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
welve o'clock, the procession, marshalled according to order, moved off on its way to Westminster, with a flourish of trumpets. The Lord Mayor, (Right Hon. William Cubitt,) accompanied by his chaplain, and by Mr. Sewell and Mr. Beddome, his sword and mace bearers, in the state carriage of the Corporation, drawn by six horses, and attended by a cavalry escort, was of course the principal person of interest in the pageant. Next to him in point of attraction, were the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex, with their chaplains, each in a splendid chariot, drawn by four horses. The Lord Mayor having been sworn in, the accustomed inaugural entertainment took place in Guildhall in the evening, which was appropriately decorated for the occasion, under the tasteful direction of Mr. J. B. Bunning, architect to the City of London. The corridors and lobbies, from the entrance to the hall, were adorned with trophies, statutes, mirrors, and flowering plants. The hall itself was profusely decorated
erfere with the full supplies of that article so necessary for the productive industry of the country, yet no doubt that temporary evil will be productive of permanent good, (cheers,) and we shall find in various quarters of the globe sure, and certain, and ample supplies, which will render us no longer dependent on one source of production for that which is so necessary for the industry and welfare of the country. (Cheers.) Gentlemen, when we look without we see, no doubt, in many parts of Europe circumstances which, if not dealt with by prudence and discretion, may lead to local disturbances,which I trust will not, at least, extend themselves to bring us within their range. (Cheers.) On the other side of the Atlantic we witness, with the deepest affliction, (cheers,) with an affliction which no words can express, (cheers,) differences of the most lamentable kind among those whom we call our cousins and our relations. (Cheers.) It is not for us to pass judgment upon these disputes;
London, Madison County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
for more than six hundred years, Alderman Cubitt went in state from Guildhall, London, to Westminster, attended by members of the Court of Aldermen, all the principa Exchequer on his election, for the second time in succession, as Lord Mayor of London. The day, which was as sunny and genial as one in midsummer, attracted an enorerest in the pageant. Next to him in point of attraction, were the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex, with their chaplains, each in a splendid chariot, drawn by four e honor to preside — I can assure him of the entire sympathy of the citizens of London, and I think I may say of the whole British people. I can assure him that our nd if I may be permitted to come down to the limits of your own municipality of London, there is not a street, nor an alley, nor a lane, which is not scrutinized withand peace everywhere. (Loud cheering.) The Lord Mayor said: The citizens of London think it the highest honor to be allowed to entertain any of her Majesty's Mini
Westminster (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
ayor's Banquet. Speeches of Mr. Adams and Lord Palmerston. Saturday, Nov. 9th, being Lord Mayor's day, conformably with a custom which had obtained for more than six hundred years, Alderman Cubitt went in state from Guildhall, London, to Westminster, attended by members of the Court of Aldermen, all the principal officers of the Corporation, and representatives of most, if not all, of the ancient livery companies, to be presented to the Barons of the Exchequer on his election, for the sec As usual, the chief interest of the occasion at first centred in Guildhall, with its precincts, as the place from which the procession was to start. About twelve o'clock, the procession, marshalled according to order, moved off on its way to Westminster, with a flourish of trumpets. The Lord Mayor, (Right Hon. William Cubitt,) accompanied by his chaplain, and by Mr. Sewell and Mr. Beddome, his sword and mace bearers, in the state carriage of the Corporation, drawn by six horses, and attended
Avon, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
eighty years, we claim to be joint heritors with you in all that is great and noble in your past history. Every bold stroke for liberty, whether civil or religious, is matter of pride for us as it is for you. Magna Charta is a common landmark for us all. And if from this I turn to the field of literature or science, where, I ask, is there a great name in England which is not equally venerated in America? It was but the other day that I took a little trip to the banks of your little river Avon, to visit the birthplace and the last resting place of your great poet, and there I found on the record of the pilgrims who go to that shrine that a great proportion are from America. (Cheers.) So, among philosophers we know no greater guide than Bacon, in science no higher authority than Newton; and if I may be permitted to come down to the limits of your own municipality of London, there is not a street, nor an alley, nor a lane, which is not scrutinized with eagerness by my countrymen on
Drewry's Bluff (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 151
ur own municipality of London, there is not a street, nor an alley, nor a lane, which is not scrutinized with eagerness by my countrymen on account of their associations with persons and events of which they have read at home in the historical or the literary productions of the mother country. (Cheers.) Neither is there a deed of heroism recorded here that does not elicit its tribute of applause in the remotest hamlet of the western hemisphere. I have myself met with the story of Grace Darling's courage stuck up in the small public room of an inn in an obscure American town; so the example of self-devotion of your Florence Nightingale--(cheers)--has raised the admiration and stimulated the ardor of imitation of quite as many of my fair countrywomen as it has done of her own. And perhaps I may be permitted here to make an allusion to a higher character, so far as to say that through the breadth of the United States, from sea to sea, the name of her Majesty the Queen is held in the
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