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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 170
Doc. 161. Confederate Episcopal Church. The subjoined is taken from the Richmond Examiner of November 14th: We publish below, as general information, and to gratify our numerous readers belonging to that communion, The Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America, as proposed by the General Convention of that church, lately held at Columbia, South Carolina. The Convention, we learn, was well attended, all the bishops of that church in the Confederate States being present, except Bishop Polk, of Louisiana, together with a full attendance of clerical and lay deputies. The venerable Bishop Meade, of Virginia, as senior bishop, presided over the body. The general tone of its deliberations, though entirely free from asperity toward the church of the North. gave evidence of a deep and settled conviction, on every hand, that the separation in church organization, like that in civil government, was, and ought to be, complete and perpetual.
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 170
Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America, as proposed by the General Convend, all the bishops of that church in the Confederate States being present, except Bishop Polk, of Lo independent church organization for the Confederate States, every thing was done with harmony and gProtestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America. article I: This church, retainProtestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America. Art. II. There shall be in this church having jurisdiction within the Confederate States or the territories thereof. Each diocil. Art. IV. Whenever any one of the Confederate States shall contain more than one diocese, saiII. A new diocese, formed in any of the Confederate States, or in any territory thereof, not now reProtestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America. No person ordained by a foreigr assistant bishop in any diocese in the Confederate States, nor be entitled to a seat in the House
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 170
ed is taken from the Richmond Examiner of November 14th: We publish below, as general information, and to gratify our numerous readers belonging to that communion, The Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America, as proposed by the General Convention of that church, lately held at Columbia, South Carolina. The Convention, we learn, was well attended, all the bishops of that church in the Confederate States being present, except Bishop Polk, of Louisiana, together with a full attendance of clerical and lay deputies. The venerable Bishop Meade, of Virginia, as senior bishop, presided over the body. The general tone of its deliberations, though entirely free from asperity toward the church of the North. gave evidence of a deep and settled conviction, on every hand, that the separation in church organization, like that in civil government, was, and ought to be, complete and perpetual. In taking the necessary steps to form an independent
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 170
Church in the Confederate States of America. article I: This church, retaining the name of Protestant Episcopal, shall be known as the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America. Art. II. There shall be in this church a General Council. There may be also provincial councils and diocesan councils. Art. III. The General Council of this church shall meet on the second Wednesday in November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, at Augusta, Ga., and on the same day in every third year thereafter, in such place as shall be determined by the Council. In case there shall be an epidemic disease, or other good cause to render it necessary to alter the place appointed for such meeting, the presiding bishop may designate another convenient place for holding of such Council; and special meetings may be called at other times in the manner hereafter to be determined. The General Council shall consist of two houses — the House of Bis
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 170
The subjoined is taken from the Richmond Examiner of November 14th: We publish below, as general information, and to gratify our numerous readers belonging to that communion, The Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America, as proposed by the General Convention of that church, lately held at Columbia, South Carolina. The Convention, we learn, was well attended, all the bishops of that church in the Confederate States being present, except Bishop Polk, of Louisiana, together with a full attendance of clerical and lay deputies. The venerable Bishop Meade, of Virginia, as senior bishop, presided over the body. The general tone of its deliberations, though entirely free from asperity toward the church of the North. gave evidence of a deep and settled conviction, on every hand, that the separation in church organization, like that in civil government, was, and ought to be, complete and perpetual. In taking the necessary steps to form
Doc. 161. Confederate Episcopal Church. The subjoined is taken from the Richmond Examiner of November 14th: We publish below, as general information, and to gratify our numerous readers belonging to that communion, The Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America, as proposed by the General Convention of that church, lately held at Columbia, South Carolina. The Convention, we learn, was well attended, all the bishops of that church in the Confederate States being present, except Bishop Polk, of Louisiana, together with a full attendance of clerical and lay deputies. The venerable Bishop Meade, of Virginia, as senior bishop, presided over the body. The general tone of its deliberations, though entirely free from asperity toward the church of the North. gave evidence of a deep and settled conviction, on every hand, that the separation in church organization, like that in civil government, was, and ought to be, complete and perpetual
information, and to gratify our numerous readers belonging to that communion, The Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America, as proposed by the General Convention of that church, lately held at Columbia, South Carolina. The Convention, we learn, was well attended, all the bishops of that church in the Confederate States being present, except Bishop Polk, of Louisiana, together with a full attendance of clerical and lay deputies. The venerable Bishop Meade, of Virginia, as senior bishop, presided over the body. The general tone of its deliberations, though entirely free from asperity toward the church of the North. gave evidence of a deep and settled conviction, on every hand, that the separation in church organization, like that in civil government, was, and ought to be, complete and perpetual. In taking the necessary steps to form an independent church organization for the Confederate States, every thing was done with harmony and goo
tion proposed for the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America. article I: This church, retaining the name of Protestant Episcopal, shall be known as the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America. Art. II. There shall be in this church a General Council. There may be also provincial councils and diocesan councils. Art. III. The General Council of this church shall meet on the second Wednesday in November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, at Augusta, Ga., and on the same day in every third year thereafter, in such place as shall be determined by the Council. In case there shall be an epidemic disease, or other good cause to render it necessary to alter the place appointed for such meeting, the presiding bishop may designate another convenient place for holding of such Council; and special meetings may be called at other times in the manner hereafter to be determined. The General Council sha
November 14th (search for this): chapter 170
Doc. 161. Confederate Episcopal Church. The subjoined is taken from the Richmond Examiner of November 14th: We publish below, as general information, and to gratify our numerous readers belonging to that communion, The Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America, as proposed by the General Convention of that church, lately held at Columbia, South Carolina. The Convention, we learn, was well attended, all the bishops of that church in the Confederate States being present, except Bishop Polk, of Louisiana, together with a full attendance of clerical and lay deputies. The venerable Bishop Meade, of Virginia, as senior bishop, presided over the body. The general tone of its deliberations, though entirely free from asperity toward the church of the North. gave evidence of a deep and settled conviction, on every hand, that the separation in church organization, like that in civil government, was, and ought to be, complete and perpetual
a provisional arrangement. Constitution proposed for the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America. article I: This church, retaining the name of Protestant Episcopal, shall be known as the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America. Art. II. There shall be in this church a General Council. There may be also provincial councils and diocesan councils. Art. III. The General Council of this church shall meet on the second Wednesday in November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, at Augusta, Ga., and on the same day in every third year thereafter, in such place as shall be determined by the Council. In case there shall be an epidemic disease, or other good cause to render it necessary to alter the place appointed for such meeting, the presiding bishop may designate another convenient place for holding of such Council; and special meetings may be called at other times in the manner hereafter to be