hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 1,000 0 Browse Search
Doc 512 0 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 394 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 218 0 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 197 9 Browse Search
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 197 17 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 196 16 Browse Search
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) 170 2 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 158 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 150 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 36 total hits in 15 results.

1 2
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 175
Doc. 166. the capture of the Mabel. Commodore Dupont's report. the following official report from Commodore Dupont describes the capture of the British schooner Mabel: flag-ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbob, November 18, 1861. sir: I have the honor to report that Commander E. M. Yard, of the United States steamer Dale, captured the British schooner Mabel, on the evening of the 15th instant, in lat. 31 deg. 10 min., and lon. 80 deg. 52 min. 30 sec. west, and brought her into this harbor. She purported to be from Havana and bound for New York, but at the time of her capture was heading for St. Catherine's Sound. Her cargo consists of seven bales blankets, four cases cloth, two cases saddles and bridles, three boxes starch, twenty-five boxes tin, one hundred and twenty boxes coffee, twenty barrels potatoes, three hundred and fifty pigs of lead, thirty bags of shot, one box shoes, six bags arrow root, one case pistols, (revolvers,) and two cases of cavalry swords.
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 175
es, three boxes starch, twenty-five boxes tin, one hundred and twenty boxes coffee, twenty barrels potatoes, three hundred and fifty pigs of lead, thirty bags of shot, one box shoes, six bags arrow root, one case pistols, (revolvers,) and two cases of cavalry swords. The Mabel was formerly named the John W. Anderson, of Baltimore, as appears by the certificate of registry given at Nassau, N. P., found among his papers. She had no clearance from the port of Havana. The character of her cargo — part of it contraband — and her position as above given, seem to be strong presumptive evidence of her intention to run the blockade. I have therefore sent her to Philadelphia in charge of Master's Mate Levi Lane, of the United States steamer Dale, and seven men of that ship, for adjudication. I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 175
rt. the following official report from Commodore Dupont describes the capture of the British schooner Mabel: flag-ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbob, November 18, 1861. sir: I have the honor to report that Commander E. M. Yard, of the United States steamer Dale, captured the British schooner Mabel, on the evening of the 15th instant, in lat. 31 deg. 10 min., and lon. 80 deg. 52 min. 30 sec. west, and brought her into this harbor. She purported to be from Havana and bound for New Yorkacter of her cargo — part of it contraband — and her position as above given, seem to be strong presumptive evidence of her intention to run the blockade. I have therefore sent her to Philadelphia in charge of Master's Mate Levi Lane, of the United States steamer Dale, and seven men of that ship, for adjudication. I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Na
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 175
E. M. Yard, of the United States steamer Dale, captured the British schooner Mabel, on the evening of the 15th instant, in lat. 31 deg. 10 min., and lon. 80 deg. 52 min. 30 sec. west, and brought her into this harbor. She purported to be from Havana and bound for New York, but at the time of her capture was heading for St. Catherine's Sound. Her cargo consists of seven bales blankets, four cases cloth, two cases saddles and bridles, three boxes starch, twenty-five boxes tin, one hundred als, (revolvers,) and two cases of cavalry swords. The Mabel was formerly named the John W. Anderson, of Baltimore, as appears by the certificate of registry given at Nassau, N. P., found among his papers. She had no clearance from the port of Havana. The character of her cargo — part of it contraband — and her position as above given, seem to be strong presumptive evidence of her intention to run the blockade. I have therefore sent her to Philadelphia in charge of Master's Mate Levi Lane
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 175
atherine's Sound. Her cargo consists of seven bales blankets, four cases cloth, two cases saddles and bridles, three boxes starch, twenty-five boxes tin, one hundred and twenty boxes coffee, twenty barrels potatoes, three hundred and fifty pigs of lead, thirty bags of shot, one box shoes, six bags arrow root, one case pistols, (revolvers,) and two cases of cavalry swords. The Mabel was formerly named the John W. Anderson, of Baltimore, as appears by the certificate of registry given at Nassau, N. P., found among his papers. She had no clearance from the port of Havana. The character of her cargo — part of it contraband — and her position as above given, seem to be strong presumptive evidence of her intention to run the blockade. I have therefore sent her to Philadelphia in charge of Master's Mate Levi Lane, of the United States steamer Dale, and seven men of that ship, for adjudication. I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-o
St. Catherine's Sound (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 175
describes the capture of the British schooner Mabel: flag-ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbob, November 18, 1861. sir: I have the honor to report that Commander E. M. Yard, of the United States steamer Dale, captured the British schooner Mabel, on the evening of the 15th instant, in lat. 31 deg. 10 min., and lon. 80 deg. 52 min. 30 sec. west, and brought her into this harbor. She purported to be from Havana and bound for New York, but at the time of her capture was heading for St. Catherine's Sound. Her cargo consists of seven bales blankets, four cases cloth, two cases saddles and bridles, three boxes starch, twenty-five boxes tin, one hundred and twenty boxes coffee, twenty barrels potatoes, three hundred and fifty pigs of lead, thirty bags of shot, one box shoes, six bags arrow root, one case pistols, (revolvers,) and two cases of cavalry swords. The Mabel was formerly named the John W. Anderson, of Baltimore, as appears by the certificate of registry given at Nassau,
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 175
w York, but at the time of her capture was heading for St. Catherine's Sound. Her cargo consists of seven bales blankets, four cases cloth, two cases saddles and bridles, three boxes starch, twenty-five boxes tin, one hundred and twenty boxes coffee, twenty barrels potatoes, three hundred and fifty pigs of lead, thirty bags of shot, one box shoes, six bags arrow root, one case pistols, (revolvers,) and two cases of cavalry swords. The Mabel was formerly named the John W. Anderson, of Baltimore, as appears by the certificate of registry given at Nassau, N. P., found among his papers. She had no clearance from the port of Havana. The character of her cargo — part of it contraband — and her position as above given, seem to be strong presumptive evidence of her intention to run the blockade. I have therefore sent her to Philadelphia in charge of Master's Mate Levi Lane, of the United States steamer Dale, and seven men of that ship, for adjudication. I have the honor to be, s
S. F. Dupont (search for this): chapter 175
Doc. 166. the capture of the Mabel. Commodore Dupont's report. the following official report from Commodore Dupont describes the capture of the British schooner Mabel: flag-ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbob, November 18, 1861. sir: I have the honor to report that Commander E. M. Yard, of the United States steamer Dale, captured the British schooner Mabel, on the evening of the 15th instant, in lat. 31 deg. 10 min., and lon. 80 deg. 52 min. 30 sec. west, and brought her into this Commodore Dupont describes the capture of the British schooner Mabel: flag-ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbob, November 18, 1861. sir: I have the honor to report that Commander E. M. Yard, of the United States steamer Dale, captured the British schooner Mabel, on the evening of the 15th instant, in lat. 31 deg. 10 min., and lon. 80 deg. 52 min. 30 sec. west, and brought her into this harbor. She purported to be from Havana and bound for New York, but at the time of her capture was heading for St. Catherine's Sound. Her cargo consists of seven bales blankets, four cases cloth, two cases saddles and bridles, three boxes starch, twenty-five boxes tin, one hundred and twenty boxes coffee, twenty barrels potatoes, three hundred and fifty pigs of lead, thirty bags of shot, one box shoes, six bags arrow root, one case pistols, (revolvers,) and two cases of cavalry swords.
Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 175
es, three boxes starch, twenty-five boxes tin, one hundred and twenty boxes coffee, twenty barrels potatoes, three hundred and fifty pigs of lead, thirty bags of shot, one box shoes, six bags arrow root, one case pistols, (revolvers,) and two cases of cavalry swords. The Mabel was formerly named the John W. Anderson, of Baltimore, as appears by the certificate of registry given at Nassau, N. P., found among his papers. She had no clearance from the port of Havana. The character of her cargo — part of it contraband — and her position as above given, seem to be strong presumptive evidence of her intention to run the blockade. I have therefore sent her to Philadelphia in charge of Master's Mate Levi Lane, of the United States steamer Dale, and seven men of that ship, for adjudication. I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washingto
Doc. 166. the capture of the Mabel. Commodore Dupont's report. the following official report from Commodore Dupont describes the capture of the British schooner Mabel: flag-ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbob, November 18, 1861. sir: I have the honor to report that Commander E. M. Yard, of the United States steamer Dale, captured the British schooner Mabel, on the evening of the 15th instant, in lat. 31 deg. 10 min., and lon. 80 deg. 52 min. 30 sec. west, and brought her into this harbor. She purported to be from Havana and bound for New York, but at the time of her capture was heading for St. Catherine's Sound. Her cargo consists of seven bales blankets, four cases cloth, two cases saddles and bridles, three boxes starch, twenty-five boxes tin, one hundred and twenty boxes coffee, twenty barrels potatoes, three hundred and fifty pigs of lead, thirty bags of shot, one box shoes, six bags arrow root, one case pistols, (revolvers,) and two cases of cavalry swords.
1 2