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Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
nd it leads them to violate all the rules of civilized warfare. That they contemplate wholesale plunder is unquestionable. Hence, as the exposed planters are bound to lose more or less of property, is it not altogether better that they should destroy what they cannot remove than to allow it to fall into the hands of relentless enemies, and thus permit then to reap substantial aid and comfort in consequence? We think so; and, therefore, heartily endorse the suggestion thrown out by our Charleston contemporary. Let every bale of cotton be burned before a single flake is allowed to go into the grasp of the ruthless invader. Indeed, some of the planters on Hilton Head Island have already set the noble example of destroying every particle of property they could not transport to a place of safety. If the cotton or other property falls into the hands of the Lincolnites, the planters lose, while the Lincolnites are correspondingly advantaged; but if the planters burn their cotton the
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 180
rough a costly and hazardous process. The case is a hard one all round; but to our mind, as the Yankees are hovering about our coasts on marauding expeditions, and as they will never pay for any thing they steal or ruin, it is best to inconvenience them as much as possible, by destroying all things they are bound to capture, rather than let them take, appropriate, and enjoy effects thus villanously obtained. By way of illustration: There are twelve or fourteen millions of coin in the vaults of the banks of New Orleans. Suppose, for the sake of argument, that New Orleans was bound to succumb before the over-whelming forces of the enemy. Would it not be the part of wisdom, policy and patriotism, to sink this twelve or fourteen millions of coin to the bottom of the Mississippi, rather than to allow it to go into the coffers of the Gorilla at Washington, to aid them in enslaving and robbing the people of Louisiana and the South? We pause for a reply. --New Orleans Crescent, Nov. 18.
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
Doc. 171. advice to Southerners. The Charleston Mercury published the following soon after the attack on Port Royal, S. C.: Our enemies have invaded South Carolina for two purposes: First, to gratify their hate and revenge; and second, to gratify their avarice. The first we have to meet with fighting; but the last must be defeated by policy, where fighting fails. To defeat their avarice, our policy should be to destroy the objects their avarice proposes to feed on. General plunder is undoubtedly designed; but the special objects of their appropriation will undoubtedly be our slaves and cotton. What shall we do with them? Shall we leave them on our plantations to be appropriated by our invaders? It appears to us, our true policy is, to take off our plantations our slaves, horses and cattle, and to burn up our cotton. To leave our horses to arm them, our cattle to feed them, our slaves to strengthen and our cotton to enrich them, or to run their factories, appears to u
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
rengthen and our cotton to enrich them, or to run their factories, appears to us to be the worst policy possible. We imagine the Lincolnites hate all portions of the South alike, and that they would commit as many atrocities on the coasts of Louisiana, if ever they obtain possession, as they will in that part of South Carolina now unfortunately subject to their malign control. Their malignity is unparalleled; it extends to all the Confederate States in equal proportion, and it leads them tothe banks of New Orleans. Suppose, for the sake of argument, that New Orleans was bound to succumb before the over-whelming forces of the enemy. Would it not be the part of wisdom, policy and patriotism, to sink this twelve or fourteen millions of coin to the bottom of the Mississippi, rather than to allow it to go into the coffers of the Gorilla at Washington, to aid them in enslaving and robbing the people of Louisiana and the South? We pause for a reply. --New Orleans Crescent, Nov. 18.
Hilton Head, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
ore or less of property, is it not altogether better that they should destroy what they cannot remove than to allow it to fall into the hands of relentless enemies, and thus permit then to reap substantial aid and comfort in consequence? We think so; and, therefore, heartily endorse the suggestion thrown out by our Charleston contemporary. Let every bale of cotton be burned before a single flake is allowed to go into the grasp of the ruthless invader. Indeed, some of the planters on Hilton Head Island have already set the noble example of destroying every particle of property they could not transport to a place of safety. If the cotton or other property falls into the hands of the Lincolnites, the planters lose, while the Lincolnites are correspondingly advantaged; but if the planters burn their cotton their loss will be the same, and the abolitionists will not be benefited. Neither horses, cattle, hogs, sheep, corn nor cotton should be permitted to pass into their possession.
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 180
arm them, our cattle to feed them, our slaves to strengthen and our cotton to enrich them, or to run their factories, appears to us to be the worst policy possible. We imagine the Lincolnites hate all portions of the South alike, and that they would commit as many atrocities on the coasts of Louisiana, if ever they obtain possession, as they will in that part of South Carolina now unfortunately subject to their malign control. Their malignity is unparalleled; it extends to all the Confederate States in equal proportion, and it leads them to violate all the rules of civilized warfare. That they contemplate wholesale plunder is unquestionable. Hence, as the exposed planters are bound to lose more or less of property, is it not altogether better that they should destroy what they cannot remove than to allow it to fall into the hands of relentless enemies, and thus permit then to reap substantial aid and comfort in consequence? We think so; and, therefore, heartily endorse the su
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 180
Doc. 171. advice to Southerners. The Charleston Mercury published the following soon after the attack on Port Royal, S. C.: Our enemies have invaded South Carolina for two purposes: First, to gratify their hate and revenge; and second, to gratify their avarice. The first we have to meet with fighting; but the last must be defeated by policy, where fighting fails. To defeat their avarice, our policy should be to destroy the objects their avarice proposes to feed on. General plunder to us to be the worst policy possible. We imagine the Lincolnites hate all portions of the South alike, and that they would commit as many atrocities on the coasts of Louisiana, if ever they obtain possession, as they will in that part of South Carolina now unfortunately subject to their malign control. Their malignity is unparalleled; it extends to all the Confederate States in equal proportion, and it leads them to violate all the rules of civilized warfare. That they contemplate whole
Doc. 171. advice to Southerners. The Charleston Mercury published the following soon after the attack on Port Royal, S. C.: Our enemies have invaded South Carolina for two purposes: First, to gratify their hate and revenge; and second, to gratify their avarice. The first we have to meet with fighting; but the last must be defeated by policy, where fighting fails. To defeat their avarice, our policy should be to destroy the objects their avarice proposes to feed on. General plunder is undoubtedly designed; but the special objects of their appropriation will undoubtedly be our slaves and cotton. What shall we do with them? Shall we leave them on our plantations to be appropriated by our invaders? It appears to us, our true policy is, to take off our plantations our slaves, horses and cattle, and to burn up our cotton. To leave our horses to arm them, our cattle to feed them, our slaves to strengthen and our cotton to enrich them, or to run their factories, appears to u
November 18th (search for this): chapter 180
ough a costly and hazardous process. The case is a hard one all round; but to our mind, as the Yankees are hovering about our coasts on marauding expeditions, and as they will never pay for any thing they steal or ruin, it is best to inconvenience them as much as possible, by destroying all things they are bound to capture, rather than let them take, appropriate, and enjoy effects thus villanously obtained. By way of illustration: There are twelve or fourteen millions of coin in the vaults of the banks of New Orleans. Suppose, for the sake of argument, that New Orleans was bound to succumb before the over-whelming forces of the enemy. Would it not be the part of wisdom, policy and patriotism, to sink this twelve or fourteen millions of coin to the bottom of the Mississippi, rather than to allow it to go into the coffers of the Gorilla at Washington, to aid them in enslaving and robbing the people of Louisiana and the South? We pause for a reply. --New Orleans Crescent, Nov. 18.