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September 10th (search for this): chapter 21
o, Lieut.-Col. White, now commanding Twelfth Ohio regiments, and of Capt. McMullen, of the howitzer battery. Very respectfully, your obdt. servant, H. W. Benham, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Brigade Colonel Lytle's report. Headquarters Montgomery Regiment, 10th O. V. I. Carnifex Ferry, Sept. 11, 1861. Brigadier-General Benham, Commanding First Brigade, U. S. A.: sir: I have the honor to report that, agreeably to your orders, I proceeded with my command on yesterday, Sept. 10th, at three o'clock, yourself accompanying and directing the advance with me, to reconnoitre the position of the enemy, supposed to be in force in the neighborhood of Gauley River; our road led up hill through a densely timbered forest, and as I advanced I threw out flanking parties to the right and left, and skirmishers in advance of my column. After passing through the woods for half a mile, our skirmishers were suddenly engaged in front, and I pushed on to their relief until I reached a
September 11th (search for this): chapter 21
vanced to the main road below our batteries, when I was ordered, by one of your staff, to halt my command on the side of the road for further orders, which I did. I did not see the left wing of the regiment until evening, nor do I personally know how or why the regiment was separated. Respectfully submitted, J. D. Wallace, Capt. Co. A, Twelfth Regiment O. V. Cincinnati Gazette narrative. battle-field of Carnifex Ferry, Eight miles southwest of Summersville, Nicholas County, Va., Sept 11. On the last day of our disastrous summer of ‘61, General Rosecrans moved from Clarksburg, to put himself at the head of his army, and resume active operations. The popular understanding was, that he meant to attack Lee at Cheat Mountain Gaps. The truth, as has heretofore been repeatedly hinted in this correspondence, was that he meant to complete the work to which his strategic plans had been for a month directed, by engaging Floyd in the region of our Kanawha line. Reynolds held Lee
September 12th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 21
ds,) and seven missing. The enemy's loss is not known, but one of our own men captured at Cross Lanes and recaptured here, states that it took the train with killed and wounded an hour and twenty minutes to pass the hospital where he was confined, on their retreat. Floyd himself is known to have been wounded in the arm — some of the prisoners say severely — during the action. Agate. New York times narrative. camp Scott, near Carnifex Ferry, Gauley River, Nicholas Co., Va., September 12th, 1861. A succinct account of the battle of Carnifex Ferry, on the 10th inst.; the retreat of Floyd and his army; the capture of his camp equipage and large quantities of army stores, ammunition, muskets, swords, and the personal baggage of Floyd and his officers, on the morning of the 11th inst., was forwarded by telegraph from this camp to the Associated Press of the country. Presuming that the tidings reached you, it will be consistent to bring up the history of the expedition from th
September 11th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 21
anding First Brigade Colonel Lytle's report. Headquarters Montgomery Regiment, 10th O. V. I. Carnifex Ferry, Sept. 11, 1861. Brigadier-General Benham, Commanding First Brigade, U. S. A.: sir: I have the honor to report that, agreeably to enth Ohio Regiment U. S. A. Col. Smith's report. Headquarters Thirteenth regiment O. V. I. Camp Scott, Va., Sept. 11th, 1861. Lieut. J. O. Stanage, A. A. A.-Gen.: sir: I have the honor to submit the following statement of the part taken bubmitted, W. S. Smith, Com. Thirteenth Regiment O. V. U. S. A. Lieut.-Col. White's report. camp Scott, Va., Sept. 11, 1861. Brig.-Gen. Benham: sir: On the 10th inst., two miles from the enemy's intrenchments at Carnifex Ferry, Va., the Tult to restore it in less than two days. Lynchburg (Va.) Republican account. Headquarters, near Dogwood Gap, Sept. 11, 1861. On Monday last we received intelligence of the advance of the enemy in heavy force from the direction of Sutton,
been wounded in the arm — some of the prisoners say severely — during the action. Agate. New York times narrative. camp Scott, near Carnifex Ferry, Gauley River, Nicholas Co., Va., September 12th, 1861. A succinct account of the battle of Carnifex Ferry, on the 10th inst.; the retreat of Floyd and his army; the capture of his camp equipage and large quantities of army stores, ammunition, muskets, swords, and the personal baggage of Floyd and his officers, on the morning of the 11th inst., was forwarded by telegraph from this camp to the Associated Press of the country. Presuming that the tidings reached you, it will be consistent to bring up the history of the expedition from the point from whence I wrote my last communication to you. The incidents of the march were much more interesting to us than a sketch of them could be to your readers, and I will, therefore, hurry over the ground currente calamo, until we reach the battle-ground. The column moved deliberately over
the operation of my brigade in the battle at the rebel intrenchments at Carnifex Ferry on the 10th inst. As previously stated to you, the head of my brigade started from the camp, eight miles north o regiment in the action near Connifex Ferry yesterday. At about eleven o'clock A. M. on the 10th inst., a general halt of the whole column having been ordered at a point about two miles distant fro.-Col. White's report. camp Scott, Va., Sept. 11, 1861. Brig.-Gen. Benham: sir: On the 10th inst., two miles from the enemy's intrenchments at Carnifex Ferry, Va., the Twelfth regiment Ohio VoCapt. Wallace's report. camp Scott, September 13, 1861. Brig.-Gen. Benham: sir: On the 10th inst. the Twelfth Ohio regiment, commanded by Col. J. W. Lowe, advanced through an old encampment, o Co., Va., September 12th, 1861. A succinct account of the battle of Carnifex Ferry, on the 10th inst.; the retreat of Floyd and his army; the capture of his camp equipage and large quantities of a
Doc. 21. battle of Connifex Ferry, Va. Report of General Rosecrans. Headquarters army of Virginia, camp Scott, September 11 P. M. To Colonel E. D. Townsend: We yesterday marched seventeen and a half miles, reached the enemy's intrenched position in front of Connifex Ferry, driving his advance outposts and pickets before us. We found him occupying a strongly intrenched position, covered by a forest too dense to admit its being seen at a distance of three hundred yards. His force was five regiments, besides the one driven in. He had probably sixteen pieces of artillery. At three o'clock we began a strong reconnoissance, which proceeded to such length, we were about to assault the position on the flank and front, when night coming on, and our troops being completely exhausted, I drew them out of the woods and posted them in the order of battle behind ridges immediately in front of the enemy's position, where they rested on their arms till morning. Shortly after daylig
September 3rd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 21
having no material for immediately repairing the bridge, it was thought prudent to encamp the troops, occupy the ferry and the captured camp, sending a few rifle cannon shots after the enemy to produce a moral effect. Our loss would probably amount to twenty killed and one hundred wounded. The enemy's loss had not been ascertained, but from report it must have been considerable. W. S. Rosecrans. General Benham's report. Headquarters army of occupation, W. Va., camp Scott, September 3, 1861. sir: I have the honor to report as follows in relation to the operation of my brigade in the battle at the rebel intrenchments at Carnifex Ferry on the 10th inst. As previously stated to you, the head of my brigade started from the camp, eight miles north of Somerville, at about four A. M., reaching that place before eight A. M., in good order and with the men eager for the continuance of the march toward the enemy, who, we there ascertained, were well intrenched and determined to
rsville; Floyd had bit at the bait by coming in; and now Rosecrans proposed to hit him hard in the head before he could run. Such was the plan. And so, while the people thought the General was hurrying to Beverly, he had reached Bull Town, and Sutton, and Birch River, had collected his scattered army, and was ready for his work. Just a week had been consumed. After a variety of vexatious delays, the army moved from Birch River toward Summersville late in the forenoon of Monday, the ninth inst. The telegraph had preceded us, and despatches had been received from our outposts that our pickets had been fired on, and that rebels were skulking near them through the woods. In advance of our whole column went a squad of cavalry, to bear back the earliest intelligence of any hostile movement; at a considerable distance behind came an advance guard, then, after another interval, the pioneers, and then Benham's brigade. McCook's followed, and Scammon's brought up the rear; while for fi
September 13th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 21
to you for orders, when we were attached to the Thirteenth and Twenty-eighth regiments, under Cols. Smith and Moore, to attack the enemy upon his extreme right, of which movement Col. Smith will report. The movements and operations of the right wing will be reported to you by Senior Capt. J. D. Wallace, who assumed command after Col. John W. Lowe was killed. Respectfully submitted, C. B. White, Lieut.-Col. Com. Twelfth Regiment O. V. Capt. Wallace's report. camp Scott, September 13, 1861. Brig.-Gen. Benham: sir: On the 10th inst. the Twelfth Ohio regiment, commanded by Col. J. W. Lowe, advanced through an old encampment, on its way to the battle-field; at this point, an order was given by Capt. Hartsuff, of Gen. Rosecrans' staff, to advance through the woods toward the enemy's fire. The right wing of the regiment, viz., Companies A, F, K, and E, advanced through the woods, under the command of Col. Lowe, toward the enemy's fire, and in front of one of his batteries
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