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Fitzgibbons (search for this): chapter 21
nd small-arms, and a part of three companies, A, E, and D, actually moved up to within pistol-shot of the intrenchments, and for some time maintained an unequal contest. Both my color bearers were struck down; the bearer of the State color--Sergt. Fitzgibbons--had the staff shot away and his hand shattered, and in a few moments afterward was shattered in both thighs while waving his color on the broken staff. The bearer of the National color--Sergt. O'Connor--was, at the same time, struck dhrew him. The horse dashed over the rebel intrenchments, and was killed, and the gallant Lytle himself was assisted into a house not a hundred feet off, and heard the crash of cannon balls through it and over it until the battle ended. Color-Sergeant Fitzgibbons, who was behind the colonel when he fell, had his right hand shattered, but gathering the Stars and Stripes in his left, he waved them again enthusiastically, and was torn to pieces by a round shot. Sergeant O'Connor snatched the falli
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 21
neral Rosecrans moved from Clarksburg, to put himself at the head of his army, and resume active operations. The popular understanding was, that he meant to attack Lee at Cheat Mountain Gaps. The truth, as has heretofore been repeatedly hinted in this correspondence, was that he meant to complete the work to which his strategic plans had been for a month directed, by engaging Floyd in the region of our Kanawha line. Reynolds held Lee in check at the Cheat Mountain; a gap in our lines had been purposely made at Summersville; Floyd had bit at the bait by coming in; and now Rosecrans proposed to hit him hard in the head before he could run. Such was the planpened immediately with Gauley Bridge, and we now have two lines of transportation open to the Ohio. I do not know what will be done next, but it is reported that Lee attacked Gen. Reynolds at Cheat Mountain to-day. We are encamped at the Cross Roads, two miles from the battle-field. Western. N. B.--McCook's brigade cross
J. J. Reynolds (search for this): chapter 21
Mountain Gaps. The truth, as has heretofore been repeatedly hinted in this correspondence, was that he meant to complete the work to which his strategic plans had been for a month directed, by engaging Floyd in the region of our Kanawha line. Reynolds held Lee in check at the Cheat Mountain; a gap in our lines had been purposely made at Summersville; Floyd had bit at the bait by coming in; and now Rosecrans proposed to hit him hard in the head before he could run. Such was the plan. And soans immediately went to the front, to inquire into sharp firing in the direction of the ferry. It turned out that our skirmishers had driven in the rebel pickets, and in their eager chase had disturbed a considerable body of the enemy under Colonel Reynolds, who were encamped on the hill, not a mile and a half from the forks of the road where we had been halting so long. The news was communicated to the troops, who received it with inspiring shouts. It was now perfectly obvious to all that we
H. W. Benham (search for this): chapter 21
V. I. Carnifex Ferry, Sept. 11, 1861. Brigadier-General Benham, Commanding First Brigade, U. S. A.: intrenchments, my regiment was ordered by General Benham to form in line of battle behind the crestoad, and then went in person to report to Generals Benham and Rosecrans; this I did, and requested e supported, if necessary, by the remainder of Benham's brigade. Lytle was still about a mile ahead to support the four advance companies, and Gen. Benham, who was well up with the advance, sent bac to fall into an ambuscade or masked battery. Benham's skirmishers flanked the road on either side,ad. Nearly two hours were thus occupied, when Benham sent back word that the reconnoissance was effecting the general movements of the division. Benham was also in the front of battle, watching his detail the engagement more minutely. When Gen. Benham went to the front, an armed reconnoissance oyd's precipitation had exposed his lines. Gen. Benham, Col. Lytle, and Col. Smith, however, were [18 more...]
Stephen J. McGroarty (search for this): chapter 21
as highly creditable. Having been wounded in the early portion of the action, I was necessarily separated from the greater portion of the command, and among those whose gallant conduct came under my own eyes, I would especially mention Capt. Stephen J. McGroarty, commanding the color company; Lieut. John Mallory, Co. D; and Lieut. Fanning, of Co. A. Both Lieut. Fanning and Capt. McGroarty were severely wounded, the latter while rallying his men around their colors, and the former while leadingCapt. McGroarty were severely wounded, the latter while rallying his men around their colors, and the former while leading his men to the attack; Capts. Steele and Tiernon are also worthy of especial mention for their gallantry. I would also mention the name of Corporal Sullivan, of Co. E, who, in the midst of a galling fire, went across the front of the enemy's batteries and returned with water to the wounded. Of the portion of the regiment under the command of Major Burke, that officer makes honorable mention of the names of Capt. H. M. Hard, Co. J; Capt. Robinson, Co. K; Capt. Hudson and Lieut. Hickly, Co.
hough without any known effect except, on the vis a tergo principle, to accelerate their speed. In a few moments the cavalry squad returned, marching between them a couple of the rebels, with the green, shirt-fashion blouse, and white muslin rag over the cap, that were known as the uniform of a raw militia cavalry company of the rebels. One of the prisoners was from Parkersburg — the other from Guyandotte. Both had been at Cross Lanes, and one of the fellows was relieved of the sword of Capt. Dyer, which he had stripped from the corpse of the poor Captain on the field. Meantime the general had already ordered forward the column, had gathered up the more intelligent of the citizens, and questioned them about the roads and by-ways, and all the topographical features of the country; had procured the official map of the county from the Clerk's office, and had learned from the frightened inhabitants all they knew or were willing to tell of the position, defences, and strength of the e
re from behind the breastwork of logs and rails, distant now about one hundred yards. The order was immediately given to my regiment to fall down and creep up to the crest of the hill, when we opened fire and maintained it briskly, driving the enemy in upon his centre. Having been ordered to make a reconnoissance, not an attack, we ceased firing, and lay in our position to await further orders, sending Lieut.-Col. Mason to report the result of our reconnoissance to Generals Benham and Rosecraus. I have since learned through a prisoner taken by us, that our fire cleared the enemy from his works on the right, and drove him in on his centre. After waiting, as I supposed, a sufficient length of time, and finding that Col. Mason had lost his way in the thick underbrush, I drew down my eight companies into the ravine and back into the main road, and then went in person to report to Generals Benham and Rosecrans; this I did, and requested that a Brigadier might lead us to an attack
the two rifled guns of Captain Schneider, and Captain McMullen with his four mountain howitzers immediately fas then also done with one-half of Schneider's and McMullen's pieces, to enfilade the crest of the hill from tpieces of the Thirteenth Ohio regiment, and of Captain McMullen, commanding the howitzer battery, I can speak , now commanding Twelfth Ohio regiments, and of Capt. McMullen, of the howitzer battery. Very respectfully,ng to our previous order of march, the Tenth Ohio, McMullen's battery, my own section of two rifled cannon, ane malevolent. Adjutant-General Hartsuff now got McMullen's howitzer battery into position, and it began plae back, and, by order of the General, sent forward McMullen's howitzers and Snyder's two field-pieces, which pis family. Snyder's two rifled six-pounders and McMullen's batteries were planted in the road about two hunquently part of each was removed to the right. Capt. McMullen was finally struck down, but not seriously hurt
ed to fight some too, and McCook shouting back that he knew they would, and that that was just what he wanted them for; Col. Moor riding proudly at the head of his regiment, his grim face wreathed in unwonted smiles, and Hartsuff galloping far aheadsignal. They poured a deadly volley, and brought back the most accurate information concerning the main rebel redoubt. Moor joined Smith, on the enemy's extreme right, while Porschner, greatly to his disappointment, could not get into action at aravine in front of the centre of the rebels' right wing, and they were afterward supported by the Twenty-eighth, under Colonel Moor. The former met with no casualties, though under fire. The latter pushed across the ravine, and extended the line upcoolness and steadfastness under the most trying circumstances. Col. McCook and Lieut.-Col. Sandershoff, of the Ninth; Col. Moor and Lieut.-Col. Becker, of the Twenty-eighth ; Col. Porschner, of the Forty-seventh; Major R. B. Hayes, of the Twenty-t
Thomas M. Ewing (search for this): chapter 21
th, we were about to assault the position on the flank and front, when night coming on, and our troops being completely exhausted, I drew them out of the woods and posted them in the order of battle behind ridges immediately in front of the enemy's position, where they rested on their arms till morning. Shortly after daylight a runaway contraband came in and reported that the enemy had crossed the Gauley during the night, by means of the ferry and a bridge which they had completed. Colonel Ewing was ordered to take possession of the camp, which he did about seven o'clock, capturing a few prisoners, two stand of colors, a considerable quantity of arms, with quartermaster's stores, messing, and camp equipage. The enemy having destroyed the bridge across the Gauley, which here rushes through a deep gorge, and our troops being still much fatigued and having no material for immediately repairing the bridge, it was thought prudent to encamp the troops, occupy the ferry and the capt
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