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Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
from none of them, hitherto, had we been able to see more than the foliage-masked sides, and forest-top summit lines of the nearest hills on either side. Here we were on a point that overtopped the whole country westward to the borders of our own Ohio, and from that fastness for guerillas, (if not den of thieves,) the eye reached from range to range of tree-covered hills, that rose and fell, in the magnificent panorama spread out before us, like the billows of the ocean, growing smaller as they and wounded across the Gauley. A regard for truth prompts me to say that we found no dead within their lines, which goes to display their cowardice more conspicuously. The conduct of our gallant Buckeye troops — for they were exclusively from Ohio — is a theme of admiration. With the exception of a few who straggled from their commands after fling a few rounds, the lads displayed not only the most eager courage, but staying qualities which would have delighted veterans. The generals were
Switzerland (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 21
ng the valley of the Big Birch, we immediately began to climb the mountain, which, from our late encampment, had seemed to block up the way. For six miles we climbed in tortuous windings, pausing on the way to bury a rebel, who had been killed while attempting a guerilla shot on Colonel Smith the evening before, and whose corpse had lain in its gore by the roadside till morning. At last we reached the summit, and from that summit of Powell's mountain, there burst upon the eye a view that Switzerland might be challenged to surpass. The country through which we were moving was but a succession of spurs and outlying ranges from the Greenbrier, and from none of them, hitherto, had we been able to see more than the foliage-masked sides, and forest-top summit lines of the nearest hills on either side. Here we were on a point that overtopped the whole country westward to the borders of our own Ohio, and from that fastness for guerillas, (if not den of thieves,) the eye reached from range
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
e Forty-seventh; Major R. B. Hayes, of the Twenty-third; Lieut.-Col. Korff and Major Burke, of the Tenth, and many company officers, distinguished themselves by their bravery and conduct. Nearly all the troops actually engaged are residents of Cincinnati. The blood of the Queen City may be relied upon. The Bloody Tenth, known as the Irish regiment, is composed of six companies of Irishmen, two of Germans, and two of Americans. The personal courage of Gen. Rosecrans and Gen. Benham was conspiin utter confusion. The colonel's horse, as if unconscious of the fall of his rider dashed up to our embankments and around them into our camp, and, from the inscriptions on the mountings of his pistols, proved to be Colonel Wm. H. Lytle's, of Cincinnati. I saw the daring officer fall from his horse, and he was certainly one of the bravest of the brave, for he sought the bubble reputation at the very cannon's mouth. The enemy's columns now opened upon us along the whole of our centre and ri
Smyth (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ed their numbers, baggage, stores, and more than two hundred sick and wounded across the river, from ten P. M. to four A. M., along one of the steepest and worst single track roads that ever horse's hoof trod or man ever saw. Four o'clock found these men three miles from the enemy, with our newly-constructed bridge destroyed and our boats sunk behind us. I think these facts show a generalship seldom exhibited anywhere. Rev. Mr. McMahon, one of our most pious and worthy chaplains, from Smythe County, was along with the general and his staff during the whole fight, and where the balls flew thickest. Dr. Leaves, of Wytheville, has the fine pistol of Colonel Lytle, and Captain Steptoe, of Bedford, his splendidly mounted saddle and bridle. The fine horse was shot through and died. By the way, Dr. Gleaves was in the fight, and exposed himself much in the discharge of his surgical duties. General Floyd's tent, from which floated our glorious flag, was completely riddled with the balls
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
Doc. 21. battle of Connifex Ferry, Va. Report of General Rosecrans. Headquarters army of Virginia, camp Scott, September 11 P. M. To Colonel E. D. Townsend: We yesterday marched seventeen and a half miles, reached the enemy's intrenched position in front of Connifex Ferry, driving his advance outposts and pickets before us. We found him occupying a strongly intrenched position, covered by a forest too dense to admit its being seen at a distance of three hundred yards. His force was five regiments, besides the one driven in. He had probably sixteen pieces of artillery. At three o'clock we began a strong reconnoissance, which proceeded to such length, we were about to assault the position on the flank and front, when night coming on, and our troops being completely exhausted, I drew them out of the woods and posted them in the order of battle behind ridges immediately in front of the enemy's position, where they rested on their arms till morning. Shortly after daylig
Guyandotte (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
within long musket range of a small party of the rebels, and had sent a few shots after them, though without any known effect except, on the vis a tergo principle, to accelerate their speed. In a few moments the cavalry squad returned, marching between them a couple of the rebels, with the green, shirt-fashion blouse, and white muslin rag over the cap, that were known as the uniform of a raw militia cavalry company of the rebels. One of the prisoners was from Parkersburg — the other from Guyandotte. Both had been at Cross Lanes, and one of the fellows was relieved of the sword of Capt. Dyer, which he had stripped from the corpse of the poor Captain on the field. Meantime the general had already ordered forward the column, had gathered up the more intelligent of the citizens, and questioned them about the roads and by-ways, and all the topographical features of the country; had procured the official map of the county from the Clerk's office, and had learned from the frightened inh
Bedford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
f trod or man ever saw. Four o'clock found these men three miles from the enemy, with our newly-constructed bridge destroyed and our boats sunk behind us. I think these facts show a generalship seldom exhibited anywhere. Rev. Mr. McMahon, one of our most pious and worthy chaplains, from Smythe County, was along with the general and his staff during the whole fight, and where the balls flew thickest. Dr. Leaves, of Wytheville, has the fine pistol of Colonel Lytle, and Captain Steptoe, of Bedford, his splendidly mounted saddle and bridle. The fine horse was shot through and died. By the way, Dr. Gleaves was in the fight, and exposed himself much in the discharge of his surgical duties. General Floyd's tent, from which floated our glorious flag, was completely riddled with the balls of the enemy. Our young adjutant, Peter Otey, finding one of his men wounded, gallantly picked him up, and walked off with him in full face of the enemy's fire. The Hessians approached within thirty
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
and two pieces of artillery. They also informed us that General Rosecrans commanded in person. Our force was only one thousand seven hundred men, and, while we had strong reason to believe that we could maintain our position even against such terrible odds, we did not think it prudent to hazard so much. We had despatched General Wise in the morning for reinforcements, and he had declined to send them for fear of an attack upon him by General Cox. We had also sent couriers for the North Carolina and Georgia regiments to come up, but it was impossible for them to reach us in time to support us. At ten o'clock last night, therefore, our forces proceeded to retire from the position they had so heroically defended during the day, and by light this morning they were all safely and in order across the river, with all their baggage, &c., except some few things which were lost from neglect and want of transportation. I had the misfortune to lose my horse and all my baggage, except
Summersville (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
f Carnifex Ferry, Eight miles southwest of Summersville, Nicholas County, Va., Sept 11. On the lgap in our lines had been purposely made at Summersville; Floyd had bit at the bait by coming in; anays, the army moved from Birch River toward Summersville late in the forenoon of Monday, the ninth i and by dawn the whole army was on the way. Summersville lay before us, but eight miles distant. A r march brought us into the single street of Summersville, and the rebels were seen scampering up a hng those parties — but let that pass. From Summersville to Cross Lanes was eight miles. Shortly d at six we were sweeping rapidly onward to Summersville, eight miles distant. As our scouters ascen scour the jungle. Five or six miles below Summersville, Schaumberg's Chicago Dragoons and a small rce from the direction of Sutton, along the Summersville road. On Tuesday morning Colonel McCauslin's regiment, which had been down at Summersville as our advance, was driven in, and the enemy encamp[1 more...]
Lewisburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
Gen. Floyd, terrified by the furious attack at once on his centre and both flanks, and fearing that he would either be surrounded or cut off from retreat toward Lewisburg, had evacuated his camp during the night, leaving large quantities of ammunition, arms, camp stores, and equipage behind him, had crossed the Gauley, breaking down the bridge, and completely destroying the ferry-boat behind him, and was probably making the best of his opportunities for getting back to Lewisburg. By six o'clock in the morning the old Stars and Stripes were floating over Floyd's headquarters, in the camp which was to have been proof against the world, the flesh, and the dof the servants. We are now pitching our tents at this place, on the main Charleston road, about fifteen miles from Gauley Bridge, and fifty-five miles west of Lewisburg. General Wise is encamped at Dogwood Gap, a few miles above us, while a portion of his force holds the Hawk's Nest, below us. It may not be prudent to say what
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