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Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 244
me they were filled with men, I commenced firing slowly from my bow guns, as did the Seneca; but, receiving no answer, soon ceased and, running by the batteries, anchored in the North Edisto River. On landing I found the fort, which was entirely deserted, to consist of two redoubts for five guns each, connected by a long curtain, and protected in the rear by a double fence of thick plank, with earth between, and loopholed. The guns, as the negroes informed me, had all been removed toward Charleston some weeks back. While I was making this examination Lieutenant Commanding Ammen had proceeded up the river for about five miles, the effect of which was immediately apparent in the firing of cotton-houses and outbuildings. As during the night some negroes came on board and informed us that at the small town of Rockville, which was in full sight, there was a large encampment of soldiers, at least five hundred, and Capt. Boutelle offering to go up the creek on which it was, I determined
Otter Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 244
und the fortifications which are on Edisto Island entirely deserted and partially destroyed, They consisted of two redoubts, which mounted, so far as I could judge, four guns each, but the guns had been removed. The Dale being in sight across Otter Island, in the Ashepoo, I made signal, and Lieut.-Commanding Truxton pulled over with four boats. He reported that every thing was quiet in the neighborhood of his anchorage, and that the fort on Otter Island was rapidly being placed in a state of dOtter Island was rapidly being placed in a state of defence. Up to the present time, although they had been in sight of the South Edisto forts, where we were lying, they had not yet landed there. Having finished my examination of the South Edisto, I returned to the Pawnee and stood north, with the intention of lying off Stoco for the night; but, as the weather looked threatening, and the Vixen was almost out of coal, I went into the North Edisto again for the night, in order to have an opportunity of supplying her with some. Lieut.-Commanding
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 244
ardner's corner, S. C., December 19, 1861. About half-past 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon one of the enemy's gunboats passed by Port Royal ferry. Our batteries opened fire upon her, striking her three times. Upon meeting with this rather hot reception she steamed rapidly past, and ran aground about three miles the other side of the ferry. As soon as our troops became aware of the fix into which the Yankees had got themselves, Lieut. McElhenny, of Capt. Moore's field battery, (from Wilmington, N. C.,) was despatched, with a section of the battery, to a point just opposite to the shoal on which the gunboat was aground. In the mean time three flats, crowded with the enemy's troops, had moved from the opposite shore, under a sharp fire from one of their batteries directed against our troops on the main. At that point our force consisted of Captain West's company of Jones' regiment. Lieut. McElhenny's battery arrived just as the flats had come out about midway in the stream. He
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 244
atening to permit of my making a careful examination of the Stoco, as I intended, I determined now to return at once to this place and report to you the state of affairs at the North Edisto. This I have done, reaching my anchorage here at three o'clock to-day. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, P. Drayton, Commanding. Flag-officer S. F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. A secession account. The following appeared in the Charleston Courier: Gardner's corner, S. C., December 19, 1861. About half-past 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon one of the enemy's gunboats passed by Port Royal ferry. Our batteries opened fire upon her, striking her three times. Upon meeting with this rather hot reception she steamed rapidly past, and ran aground about three miles the other side of the ferry. As soon as our troops became aware of the fix into which the Yankees had got themselves, Lieut. McElhenny, of Capt. Moore's field battery, (from Wilmington, N. C.,) was desp
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 244
Doc. 232. reconnoissance near Port Royal. Commander Drayton's report. U. S. Steamer Pawnee, Port Royal, S. C., Dec. 21, 1861. sir: In obedience to your order of the 14th instant, I left this harbor at daylight of the 16th instant, accompanied by the gunboat Seneca, Lieutenant Commanding Daniel Ammen, and coast survey steamer Vixen, Capt. C. O. Boutelle; but at the bar found that the heavy north-easter which was blowing had raised such a sea as to render it out of the question to atPort Royal, S. C., Dec. 21, 1861. sir: In obedience to your order of the 14th instant, I left this harbor at daylight of the 16th instant, accompanied by the gunboat Seneca, Lieutenant Commanding Daniel Ammen, and coast survey steamer Vixen, Capt. C. O. Boutelle; but at the bar found that the heavy north-easter which was blowing had raised such a sea as to render it out of the question to attempt entering the rivers which I was directed to examine. I therefore returned to my anchorage, which I left a second time, however, on the following morning, and reached the North Edisto at two o'clock. Shortly after, I crossed the bar with the Seneca, piloted in by Capt. Boutelle in the Vixen, which vessel he, however, left when we were inside for the Pawnee, his vessel remaining astern of us. At this time we could plainly see fortifications ahead on Edisto Island, distant a mile and a h
Edisto Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 244
, I crossed the bar with the Seneca, piloted in by Capt. Boutelle in the Vixen, which vessel he, however, left when we were inside for the Pawnee, his vessel remaining astern of us. At this time we could plainly see fortifications ahead on Edisto Island, distant a mile and a half. As it was reported to me they were filled with men, I commenced firing slowly from my bow guns, as did the Seneca; but, receiving no answer, soon ceased and, running by the batteries, anchored in the North Edisto pilot the Penguin into her anchorage off the fort, where she now is. On the morning of the 19th I ran down to the South Edisto, and, leaving the Pawnee and Seneca at the bar, went in with the Vixen. I found the fortifications which are on Edisto Island entirely deserted and partially destroyed, They consisted of two redoubts, which mounted, so far as I could judge, four guns each, but the guns had been removed. The Dale being in sight across Otter Island, in the Ashepoo, I made signal, and
Rockville, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 244
ing Ammen had proceeded up the river for about five miles, the effect of which was immediately apparent in the firing of cotton-houses and outbuildings. As during the night some negroes came on board and informed us that at the small town of Rockville, which was in full sight, there was a large encampment of soldiers, at least five hundred, and Capt. Boutelle offering to go up the creek on which it was, I determined to make them a visit in the Vixen, and at daylight of the 17th went on boardagain for the night, in order to have an opportunity of supplying her with some. Lieut.-Commanding Budd reported every thing as when I left, but on the following morning negroes came in and stated that the troops who had left the encampment at Rockville, being largely reinforced, showed a disposition to reoccupy that place. As the weather was too threatening to permit of my making a careful examination of the Stoco, as I intended, I determined now to return at once to this place and report
North Edisto River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 244
after, I crossed the bar with the Seneca, piloted in by Capt. Boutelle in the Vixen, which vessel he, however, left when we were inside for the Pawnee, his vessel remaining astern of us. At this time we could plainly see fortifications ahead on Edisto Island, distant a mile and a half. As it was reported to me they were filled with men, I commenced firing slowly from my bow guns, as did the Seneca; but, receiving no answer, soon ceased and, running by the batteries, anchored in the North Edisto River. On landing I found the fort, which was entirely deserted, to consist of two redoubts for five guns each, connected by a long curtain, and protected in the rear by a double fence of thick plank, with earth between, and loopholed. The guns, as the negroes informed me, had all been removed toward Charleston some weeks back. While I was making this examination Lieutenant Commanding Ammen had proceeded up the river for about five miles, the effect of which was immediately apparent in th
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 244
of the following morning with a party of men and boats from this vessel to lighten the Seneca, which vessel was got off at high tide. While the Vixen was running up the river she came on a small sloop laden with cotton, from which two white men were taken, whom I now have on board as prisoners. As in the mean time nearly a hundred and fifty negroes, all in a great state of alarm, had collected on board the different vessels, I determined to land them on the point, (and called in the United States steamer Penguin, which was cruising off the port,) and to leave Lieut. Commanding Budd in charge of the river, after my departure, until he could hear from you: Capt. Boutelle was kind enough to go out in the Vixen and pilot the Penguin into her anchorage off the fort, where she now is. On the morning of the 19th I ran down to the South Edisto, and, leaving the Pawnee and Seneca at the bar, went in with the Vixen. I found the fortifications which are on Edisto Island entirely desert
Henry H. Sibley (search for this): chapter 244
e from the water, was entirely deserted, I went there; but although, so far as I could learn, the troops had left at daylight, and it was then only a little after eight, the negroes, whom I found as busy as bees, had removed the most valuable part of what had been left, which was nearly every thing, excepting their arms. The encampment was a large one, had been occupied for many months, and its late tenants had evidently been in the possession of every comfort. I removed to the boats forty Sibley and four ordinary tents, besides a quantity of articles of no particular value, which were lying about, and found at a neighboring house, which seemed to have been used as Headquarters, a Confederate flag. Having pretty well cleared the ground of what was worth removing, and being desirous of examining above, I left at two o'clock, and, proceeding up the river with the Vixen, not liking to trust the Pawnee in so narrow a channel, came on the Seneca, which had started at nine o'clock to ex
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