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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 250
you have made fewer claims, and imposed less trouble upon it, than any army in the field, content to dare and do, as becomes true soldiers and patriots. Now, at the close of your laborious and eventful campaign, when you may have looked forward to a season of rest, your country has bestowed upon you the distinguished compliment of calling you to another field of action. That you will freely respond to this call your past services, so cheerfully rendered, furnish the amplest assurance. Kentucky, in her hour of peril, appeals to Virginia, her mother, and to her sisters for succor. This appeal is not unheeded by their gallant sons. The foot of the oppressor is upon her. Trusting in the cause of justice, we go to her relief, and, with the help of Him who is its author, we will do our part in hurling back and chastising the oppressor who is desecrating her soil. Soldiers! your country, your friends whom you leave behind you, will expect you, in your new field of labor, to do your
H. B. Davidson (search for this): chapter 250
est assurance. Kentucky, in her hour of peril, appeals to Virginia, her mother, and to her sisters for succor. This appeal is not unheeded by their gallant sons. The foot of the oppressor is upon her. Trusting in the cause of justice, we go to her relief, and, with the help of Him who is its author, we will do our part in hurling back and chastising the oppressor who is desecrating her soil. Soldiers! your country, your friends whom you leave behind you, will expect you, in your new field of labor, to do your duty. Remember that the eyes of the country are upon you, and that upon your action, in part, depends the result of the greatest struggle the world ever saw, involving not only your freedom, your property, and your lives, but the fate of political liberty everywhere. Remember this, and, relying on Him who controls the destinies of nations, as of individuals, you need not fear the result. By order, Brig.-Gen. John B. Floyd. H. B. Davidson, Major and Asst. Adj.-Gen.
Doc. 238. Floyd's address to his army. camp near Dublin depot, Dec. 26, 1861. Soldiers of the Army of the Kanawha: The campaign in the western portion of this State is now, as far as you are concerned, ended. At its close you can review it with pride and satisfaction. You first encountered the enemy, five months since, on his unobstructed march into the interior of the State. From that time until recalled from the field, you were engaged in perpetual warfare with him. Hard contested battles and skirmishes were matters of almost daily occurrence. Nor is it to be forgotten that laborious and arduous marches, by day and by night, were necessary, not only as furnishing you the opportunity of fighting there, but of baffling the foe at different points upon the march of invasion. And it is a fact which entitles you to the warm congratulations of your General, and to the thanks and gratitude of your country, that in the midst of the trying scenes through which you have passed,
John B. Floyd (search for this): chapter 250
Doc. 238. Floyd's address to his army. camp near Dublin depot, Dec. 26, 1861. Soldiers of the Army of the Kanawha: The campaign in the western portion of this State is now, as far as you are concerned, ended. At its close you can review it with pride and satisfaction. You first encountered the enemy, five months since, on his unobstructed march into the interior of the State. From that time until recalled from the field, you were engaged in perpetual warfare with him. Hard conteste of labor, to do your duty. Remember that the eyes of the country are upon you, and that upon your action, in part, depends the result of the greatest struggle the world ever saw, involving not only your freedom, your property, and your lives, but the fate of political liberty everywhere. Remember this, and, relying on Him who controls the destinies of nations, as of individuals, you need not fear the result. By order, Brig.-Gen. John B. Floyd. H. B. Davidson, Major and Asst. Adj.-Gen.
December 26th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 250
Doc. 238. Floyd's address to his army. camp near Dublin depot, Dec. 26, 1861. Soldiers of the Army of the Kanawha: The campaign in the western portion of this State is now, as far as you are concerned, ended. At its close you can review it with pride and satisfaction. You first encountered the enemy, five months since, on his unobstructed march into the interior of the State. From that time until recalled from the field, you were engaged in perpetual warfare with him. Hard contested battles and skirmishes were matters of almost daily occurrence. Nor is it to be forgotten that laborious and arduous marches, by day and by night, were necessary, not only as furnishing you the opportunity of fighting there, but of baffling the foe at different points upon the march of invasion. And it is a fact which entitles you to the warm congratulations of your General, and to the thanks and gratitude of your country, that in the midst of the trying scenes through which you have passed,