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Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ced our naval officers that their camp must have been set on fire, and probably some of the rebels have been killed. No doubt is entertained that this is part of Pillow's force, as the report came in day before yesterday that he was crossing the Mississippi with his entire army. The (Yankee) rebel gunboat evidently tried to de soul, and body secession and rebel. Armed neutrality in this part of the State is at an end by the palpable act of her own rebels, who have called in the aid of Pillow's rebels. Pillow thinks his position in Missouri is no longer safe or tenable, and now strikes boldly for Kentucky. Hardee is disgusted and sick of Missouri, Pillow thinks his position in Missouri is no longer safe or tenable, and now strikes boldly for Kentucky. Hardee is disgusted and sick of Missouri, and laments the day that he ever set foot in it. He says openly and boldly that Claib. Jackson has deceived him and Pillow as to the real sentiments of the people of Missouri. They were assured by him that, on their first landing, the flower of the citizens of Missouri would rush to their aid; that the great city of St. Louis
Cairo, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
Doc. 29. Naval engagement at Hickman, Kentucky. A correspondent of the St. Louis Democrat gives the following account of this affair: Cairo, Sept. 5, 1861. We had quite an exciting time here yesterday. Late in the afternoon the fleet of gunboats arrived here bringing important news from Hickman, Kentucky, and other points. Yesterday morning the Tyler and Lexington, before stationed at Columbus, Kentucky, went down to Hickman, Kentucky, on a reconnoitring expedition, but hardly expecting to meet an enemy. On approaching within a short distance of the town, before turning the bend which brings it into full view, they discovered a small stern-wheel steamer, painted black, evidently a gunboat, which took to her heels. On turning the bend they discovered, by the aid of glasses, a huge side-wheel gunboat — the Yankee--of immense power, formerly used as a tugboat in New Orleans in towing up ships from the Balize. She was plated strongly with railroad iron of the T pat
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 29
l be well armed and equipped. The truth, he says, is this, viz.: that, instead of meeting with all this aid and comfort, they find that only the scum of Missouri has joined their men, who would rather steal than work for an honest living — many of them horse thieves; many of them who would prefer whiskey to bread. Not only these facts are apparent, but also the following facts: that they cannot be disciplined; that if they do not have their own way they desert at every opportunity; and, also, they have no arms to fight with. They find that the rebels of the State of Missouri are now more completely and fully in the iron grasp of the United States than ever, and that the rebellion in its incipiency is fully crushed out, and that it would be death and destruction for them to advance into Missouri with the comparative handful of men which they might bring to bear against the Federal forces. Even Pillow, rash and foolish as he is, sees this state of affairs and acts accordingly.
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
crews are alive with enthusiasm, and determined to give the rebels the best shot in their lockers. The grand movement on the part of the rebels is now to take Kentucky out of the Union by throwing a force into her rotten part, viz.: the southern part of Kentucky, which is heart, soul, and body secession and rebel. Armed neutraKentucky, which is heart, soul, and body secession and rebel. Armed neutrality in this part of the State is at an end by the palpable act of her own rebels, who have called in the aid of Pillow's rebels. Pillow thinks his position in Missouri is no longer safe or tenable, and now strikes boldly for Kentucky. Hardee is disgusted and sick of Missouri, and laments the day that he ever set foot in it. HKentucky. Hardee is disgusted and sick of Missouri, and laments the day that he ever set foot in it. He says openly and boldly that Claib. Jackson has deceived him and Pillow as to the real sentiments of the people of Missouri. They were assured by him that, on their first landing, the flower of the citizens of Missouri would rush to their aid; that the great city of St. Louis would, in one universal voice, rise in insurrectio
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
of Pillow's rebels. Pillow thinks his position in Missouri is no longer safe or tenable, and now strikes boldly for Kentucky. Hardee is disgusted and sick of Missouri, and laments the day that he ever set foot in it. He says openly and boldly that Claib. Jackson has deceived him and Pillow as to the real sentiments of the people of Missouri. They were assured by him that, on their first landing, the flower of the citizens of Missouri would rush to their aid; that the great city of St. Louis would, in one universal voice, rise in insurrection and take the Federal forces by storm; that they would all be well armed and equipped. The truth, he says, is this, viz.: that, instead of meeting with all this aid and comfort, they find that only the scum of Missouri has joined their men, who would rather steal than work for an honest living — many of them horse thieves; many of them who would prefer whiskey to bread. Not only these facts are apparent, but also the following facts: t
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
. We had quite an exciting time here yesterday. Late in the afternoon the fleet of gunboats arrived here bringing important news from Hickman, Kentucky, and other points. Yesterday morning the Tyler and Lexington, before stationed at Columbus, Kentucky, went down to Hickman, Kentucky, on a reconnoitring expedition, but hardly expecting to meet an enemy. On approaching within a short distance of the town, before turning the bend which brings it into full view, they discovered a small stf their fire, where he could have a fare shake at her. He ran up a short distance for that purpose, the Yankee following until she came to the land battery, where she stopped under its guns. Commodore Rodgers then ran up with his two boats. At Columbus, at the upper part of the town, they were fired on from the bluff by rebels with muskets. Several balls struck the sides of the boats, and one went through the commander's gig. A couple of shell were pitched at them, which fell among them, and
Hickman, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
Doc. 29. Naval engagement at Hickman, Kentucky. A correspondent of the St. Louis Democrat gives the following account of this affair: Cairo, Sept. 5, 1861. We had quite an exciting time here yesterday. Late in the afternoon the fleet of gunboats arrived here bringing important news from Hickman, Kentucky, and other Hickman, Kentucky, and other points. Yesterday morning the Tyler and Lexington, before stationed at Columbus, Kentucky, went down to Hickman, Kentucky, on a reconnoitring expedition, but hardly expecting to meet an enemy. On approaching within a short distance of the town, before turning the bend which brings it into full view, they discovered a small stHickman, Kentucky, on a reconnoitring expedition, but hardly expecting to meet an enemy. On approaching within a short distance of the town, before turning the bend which brings it into full view, they discovered a small stern-wheel steamer, painted black, evidently a gunboat, which took to her heels. On turning the bend they discovered, by the aid of glasses, a huge side-wheel gunboat — the Yankee--of immense power, formerly used as a tugboat in New Orleans in towing up ships from the Balize. She was plated strongly with railroad iron of the T pat
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
lled in the aid of Pillow's rebels. Pillow thinks his position in Missouri is no longer safe or tenable, and now strikes boldly for Kentucky. Hardee is disgusted and sick of Missouri, and laments the day that he ever set foot in it. He says openly and boldly that Claib. Jackson deceived him and Pillow as to the real sentiments of the people of Missouri. They were assured by him that, on their first landing, the flower of the citizens of Missouri would rush to their aid; that the great city of St. Louis would, in one universal voice, rise in insurrection ing with all this aid and comfort, they find that only the scum of Missouri has joined their men, who would rather steal than work for an honeve no arms to fight with. They find that the rebels of the State of Missouri are now more completely and fully in the iron grasp of the Unnd that it would be death and destruction for them to advance into Missouri with the comparative handful of men which they might bring to bear
Gideon J. Pillow (search for this): chapter 29
ition in Missouri is no longer safe or tenable, and now strikes boldly for Kentucky. Hardee is disgusted and sick of Missouri, and laments the day that he ever set foot in it. He says openly and boldly that Claib. Jackson has deceived him and Pillow as to the real sentiments of the people of Missouri. They were assured by him that, on their first landing, the flower of the citizens of Missouri would rush to their aid; that the great city of St. Louis would, in one universal voice, rise ino, they have no arms to fight with. They find that the rebels of the State of Missouri are now more completely and fully in the iron grasp of the United States than ever, and that the rebellion in its incipiency is fully crushed out, and that it would be death and destruction for them to advance into Missouri with the comparative handful of men which they might bring to bear against the Federal forces. Even Pillow, rash and foolish as he is, sees this state of affairs and acts accordingly.
Doc. 29. Naval engagement at Hickman, Kentucky. A correspondent of the St. Louis Democrat gives the following account of this affair: Cairo, Sept. 5, 1861. We had quite an exciting time here yesterday. Late in the afternoon the fleet of gunboats arrived here bringing important news from Hickman, Kentucky, and other points. Yesterday morning the Tyler and Lexington, before stationed at Columbus, Kentucky, went down to Hickman, Kentucky, on a reconnoitring expedition, but hardly expecting to meet an enemy. On approaching within a short distance of the town, before turning the bend which brings it into full view, they discovered a small stern-wheel steamer, painted black, evidently a gunboat, which took to her heels. On turning the bend they discovered, by the aid of glasses, a huge side-wheel gunboat — the Yankee--of immense power, formerly used as a tugboat in New Orleans in towing up ships from the Balize. She was plated strongly with railroad iron of the T pat
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