hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 1,000 0 Browse Search
Doc 512 0 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 394 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 218 0 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 197 9 Browse Search
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 197 17 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 196 16 Browse Search
Hilton Head (South Carolina, United States) 170 2 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 158 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 150 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 303 total hits in 96 results.

... 5 6 7 8 9 10
tober 9, 1861. Colonel Brown's report. Headquarters, Department of Florida, Fort Pickens, October 11, 1861. Colonel: I briefly reported to you on the 9th instant that the rebels had landed on this island, partially destroyed the camp of the Sixth regiment New York Volunteers, and had been driven off by our troops. I now and Totten, are the first on the harbor, and the other on the Gulf side, about four hundred yards from Fort Pickens. About two o'clock on the morning of the 9th instant I was awakened by the officer of the day, who reported that a picket driven in had reported the landing of sixty men on the point. Having little confidence in ont of our encampment. The island is three-fourths of a mile wide at this point. We had one hundred and thirty-three men to turn out. On the morning of the 9th instant, at half-past 3 o'clock, the enemy attacked us in three columns, commencing by attacking with small parties of twenty or thirty men every sentinel. Two compani
d. The loss of the rebels is estimated at about three hundred and fifty; loss of Zouaves, ten killed and sixteen wounded; regular troops, six killed, twenty wounded, ten prisoners. The Union forces took thirty-five prisoners, three of whom, being surgeons, were let go the next morning. General Anderson, of fillibuster notoriety, who had command of the rebel expedition, was wounded in both arms in the early part of the conflict. Lieutenant D'orville's statement. On the night of the 8th instant the enemy commenced landing troops at Deer Point at about nine o'clock in the evening, the moon having gone down. The attacking force was two thousand five hundred in all, one thousand five hundred being engaged in the attack, and one thousand held in reserve on the two steamers. Beside the steamers, there were two large launches and some small boats. The debarkation completed, the enemy divided into three columns, one marching down the south beach, one along the sea-shore, and the oth
October 9th (search for this): chapter 34
ricans and two ladies escaped from Pensacola, and gave us all the news of how they describe the terrible victory. We lay upon our arms every night. I have slept but very little this week. I don't feel well. I have got the diarrhea. We will want eight hundred uniforms. Your obedient servant, William Wilson, Colonel Commanding. Captain Norman's statement. The following account of the engagement was furnished by Captain Norman, of the Wilson Zouaves: On the morning of the 9th of October, at three o'clock, it being pitchy dark, the attack was made. On the evening previous to the fight the rebels landed five hundred men on the lower part of the island, and on the same evening two steamboats were noticed to leave Warrenton, which circumstances had the effect of putting the Zouaves a little on their guard. On the muster being called, but two hundred and fifteen of the Zouaves were reported ready for immediate action, several companies of the regiment being sent to Tortuga
October 11th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 34
Doc. 34. attack on Santa Rosa Island. October 9, 1861. Colonel Brown's report. Headquarters, Department of Florida, Fort Pickens, October 11, 1861. Colonel: I briefly reported to you on the 9th instant that the rebels had landed on this island, partially destroyed the camp of the Sixth regiment New York Volunteers, and had been driven off by our troops. I now report in more detail the results of the attack. For the better understanding of the several movements, it may be well to state that the enemy landed about four miles from this fort. The place may be recognized on the map by three ponds and a mound — that the island there is about three-fourths of a mile wide; that a short distance below it narrows to some two hundred yards, then widens again, and at the camp the distance across is about five-eighths of a mile; that a succession of three or four sand ridges run on the sea side, parallel to the coast, along the island; and low, swampy ground, interspersed with sand
October 10th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 34
nteers, took one. Barney Haney is a bruiser, and Lieut. Joseph Cummings is as good a man as you'll want to find. Gen. Anderson goes in for destroying rather than killing. By mistake we had some of our men killed by their comrades. We laid down to fire, and many times the sand flew in our faces by the balls striking the ground. I claim the honor of killing the man that killed Nelms. Two of us fired at the same time, but I am satisfied that my shot took effect J. H. Pensacola, Fla., Oct. 10, 1861. The following is the list of casualties in the McDuffie Rifles, of Warrenton, Georgia, in the recent fight with the Federalists on Santa Rosa Island: Lieut. Shivers is absent; Lieut. Nelms died of a wound — he was shot through the lungs; 2d Sergeant Beddo died of his wounds; 1st Corporal Canton killed and left on the island; Private D. L. Cody missing, supposed to be killed; Privates Allen Casen and L. C. Wheeler wounded, but not dangerously;----Wall, E. E. Cody, and B. Smith wou
October 10th (search for this): chapter 34
ounds; 1st Corporal Canton killed and left on the island; Private D. L. Cody missing, supposed to be killed; Privates Allen Casen and L. C. Wheeler wounded, but not dangerously;----Wall, E. E. Cody, and B. Smith wounded very slightly. There was warm work on the island, and a good many of the enemy were killed and wounded. The Fifth Georgia regiment behaved nobly, while the enemy acted cowardly. We have taken some prisoners — among them a Major. Another secession account. Mobile, Oct. 10. The special correspondent of the Mobile Advertiser writing last evening (Wednesday) at Pensacola, sends the following details of the night attack of our forces on Santa Rosa Island: There were eleven hundred men in the expedition, under Brig. Gen. Ruggles. They crossed over to the island at two o'clock on the morning of Wednesday. At twenty minutes past four, the first gun was fired, and in forty-six minutes all that was left of the numerous camps, the extensive commissary building
... 5 6 7 8 9 10