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F. W. Pickens (search for this): chapter 34
e three we glean the folowing: Between three and four A. M. firing was heard about two miles from the fort, beyond Wilson's camp; and it appeared subsequently, by information got from the prisoners, that a deserter, who had been paid off from Pickens two days previous, had given such information to the Confederates as induced them to land on the inside beach and cross over to the south beach, and so come upon Wilson's camp suddenly, without encountering the heavy guns of the batteries. Theyr reigned. Companies were disorganized and no such thing as a regiment was known. Our men retired in great confusion, and the line was a confused mass, moving without orders, and almost without object. We expected every moment to be shelled by Pickens and the fleet, which could have swept the island and not left a man. Unfortunately for us they had sent out several companies to intercept our boats and cut off our retreat. These lay behind the sand hills and embankments, and fired upon our di
Joseph H. Adams (search for this): chapter 34
away money, hats, caps, guns, swords, pistols, and pieces of Billy's standard. Our men acted with great coolness and bravery; and having accomplished the object of our mission, we returned to the main land. As we did so, we found that the balance of the regiment was advancing to reinforce us, but finding us coming back they also returned to the camp. Our loss has been very severe. Among the killed are Lieut. L. A. Nelms of the McDuffie Rifles, of Warrenton, and aid to Col. Jackson; Joseph H. Adams and Fred. Cooke of the Clinch Rifles; and J. Stanton of the Irish Volunteers. Among the wounded are the following: N. Rice, of the Clinch Rifles, shot in the arm; William H. Smith of the same company shot in the shoulder; J. H. Harris, of the same company, shot on the right ear. I will send you the casualties in the Irish Volunteers as soon as I can obtain them. They have one killed and two wounded. The Clinch Rifles, Irish Volunteers, and McDuffie Rifles faced the front all the time.
he has efficiently and industriously performed his duty during the whole time of my command, and his services have been very valuable. Major Arnold, who succeeded to the command after the capture of his superior, conducted the affair with great gallantry, prudence, and ability. He speaks in the highest terms of Captains Robertson and Hildt, and Lieutenants Shipley and Seely, and indeed of all the others whose names I give: Major Tower and Lieut. Reese, of the Engineers; Lieuts. Duryea, Langdon, Jackson, and Taylor, United States Artillery; and Captain Dole, of the New York Volunteers. And it gives me great pleasure to append the names of non-commissioned officers and privates named by their company commanders for distinguished good conduct, and to recommend them to the favorable notice of the Government. The following are the companies of Major Vogdes and Arnold who participated in the battle, and (with a very few exceptions of individuals) to whom the greatest praise is due:
left wing of the assailants entered the camp almost without a shot being fired. The enemy then fired a murderous volley into the gallant band, which was returned with unerring aim, causing havoc and confusion among the rebels. The Zouaves, however, so sudden was the attack, were thrown into confusion, but speedily rallied by the efforts of their officers. The fighting was now conducted with a desperation on the part of the Wilson boys. They, however, did not fight with regard to order. Bush fighting was the mode adopted, and several of the Zouaves were seen to hold their ground against treble their number of opponents for over an entire hour. Various were the acts of daring and impetuous valor displayed in this unequal contest by the Federal troops. Lieutenant Baker, of Company F,. distinguished himself bravely throughout the whole struggle. Colonel Wilson fought valiantly. Captain Norman was cut off three times by the rebels from the main body, and would have been taken p
til over-powered, killing quite a number of them. Several of our pickets were killed and wounded. Private W. Scott deliberately waited until one column was within ten feet of him, and then shot the commanding officer, Capt. Bradford. In an instant after we were formed, fronting, as I supposed, the enemy. It was so dark that I could not discover a man ten feet off. We were fired into from three sides. I had just sent out Capt. Harelton with his company to the front as skirmishers, and Capt. Duffy with twenty men to the left flank, to endeavor to find out the whereabouts of the enemy, and draw their fire, when bang, we got it from all sides. By companies and file I wheeled my men into line to the left and returned their fire. At this moment a blaze arose — the tents were all on fire; the quartermaster's and commission store or building was also on fire, all at one time. The distance from the camp to the commission building is an eighth of a mile. We could then see our enemy, fo
Jim Gorman (search for this): chapter 34
we got off the island — losing several men from the regiment. * * * I never did see as calm a set of men in my life as last night. We killed the Federal sentinels all the way up, and took the enemy by surprise. I was by Gen. Anderson's side, and fired, by his orders, more than a dozen tents — among them the Commissariat; we also burnt up two hundred barrels of flour, several bales of hay, and many other articles. I killed two of Abe's men and took two prisoners while burning the camp. Jim Gorman, of the Irish Volunteers, took one. Barney Haney is a bruiser, and Lieut. Joseph Cummings is as good a man as you'll want to find. Gen. Anderson goes in for destroying rather than killing. By mistake we had some of our men killed by their comrades. We laid down to fire, and many times the sand flew in our faces by the balls striking the ground. I claim the honor of killing the man that killed Nelms. Two of us fired at the same time, but I am satisfied that my shot took effect J. H.
William Day (search for this): chapter 34
rform a very important service; twenty-seven from the Clinch Rifles, and nineteen from the Irish Volunteers. Every man who was willing to volunteer was requested to shoulder arms, and every man came to a shoulder. The captains of the companies were then requested to pick out the required number, which was done. These were taken from the Clinch Rifles, Irish Volunteers, Cuthbert Rifles, and McDuffie Rifles; and were under command of Lieut. Hallonquist, formerly of the United States Army. Lieut. Day, of the Clinch Rifles, being the junior officer, was on the left, but that wing arrived too late to take part in the action. Col. Jackson accompanied the expedition, and the entire force, which consisted of about twelve hundred men, was under command of Gen. Anderson. About two o'clock this morning we landed on the island, and marched about five miles through the enemy's lines, and into his camp, which we completely destroyed, burning up his tents, &c., and killing his sentinels as we
Peter Dyson (search for this): chapter 34
are now comfortably quartered again. Statements of three negro fugitives. The following is an account of the attack as given by three contrabands who were sent to the North in the McClellan, by Colonel Brown, from Fort Pickens. They are Peter Dyson, an intelligent black man, about thirty-five years of age, who, with his wife, a yellow woman, escaped from a Mrs. Hanson, a boarding-house keeper in Pensacola; they got to Fort Pickens in a skiff about two and a half months ago. Dyson is a fiDyson is a first-rate mason and bricklayer, and has worked on the Government forts at Pensacola for the last twenty years. The third is a young colored married woman, about twenty-five years old, who was owned by Cole Crosby, and hired out to a Mrs. Wm. O'Brien, at Pensacola. She left with two men in a sloop, and while beating up for Fort Pickens was fallen in with by the Colorado, and taken on board, and to the fort; her name is Olive Kelly, and she has been at the fort about a month. From the three we g
James Gorman (search for this): chapter 34
nd Fred. Cooke of the Clinch Rifles; and J. Stanton of the Irish Volunteers. Among the wounded are the following: N. Rice, of the Clinch Rifles, shot in the arm; William H. Smith of the same company shot in the shoulder; J. H. Harris, of the same company, shot on the right ear. I will send you the casualties in the Irish Volunteers as soon as I can obtain them. They have one killed and two wounded. The Clinch Rifles, Irish Volunteers, and McDuffie Rifles faced the front all the time. James Gorman, of the Volunteers, captured one prisoner; J. H. Harris, of the Clinch Rifles, is set down for two of Abe's dead men, and several others for the same, and for burning the enemy's camp and provender. The man who shot Nelms was also made to bite the dust by one of our own men. Too much cannot be said in praise of the officers and men; and the only regret is, that some of our men were taken prisoners by the enemy. Such is the fate of war, and we must expect, while often successful, to have
J. H. Harris (search for this): chapter 34
son; Joseph H. Adams and Fred. Cooke of the Clinch Rifles; and J. Stanton of the Irish Volunteers. Among the wounded are the following: N. Rice, of the Clinch Rifles, shot in the arm; William H. Smith of the same company shot in the shoulder; J. H. Harris, of the same company, shot on the right ear. I will send you the casualties in the Irish Volunteers as soon as I can obtain them. They have one killed and two wounded. The Clinch Rifles, Irish Volunteers, and McDuffie Rifles faced the front all the time. James Gorman, of the Volunteers, captured one prisoner; J. H. Harris, of the Clinch Rifles, is set down for two of Abe's dead men, and several others for the same, and for burning the enemy's camp and provender. The man who shot Nelms was also made to bite the dust by one of our own men. Too much cannot be said in praise of the officers and men; and the only regret is, that some of our men were taken prisoners by the enemy. Such is the fate of war, and we must expect, while oft
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