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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Winfield Scott (search for this): chapter 34
hree columns, commencing by attacking with small parties of twenty or thirty men every sentinel. Two companies charged the picket tent, the three bodies, numbering in all two thousand men, simultaneously firing volleys of musketry into the hospital and guardhouse. We were out and formed in quick time. The sentinels, the guard, and officers came running in. They had fought retreating, until over-powered, killing quite a number of them. Several of our pickets were killed and wounded. Private W. Scott deliberately waited until one column was within ten feet of him, and then shot the commanding officer, Capt. Bradford. In an instant after we were formed, fronting, as I supposed, the enemy. It was so dark that I could not discover a man ten feet off. We were fired into from three sides. I had just sent out Capt. Harelton with his company to the front as skirmishers, and Capt. Duffy with twenty men to the left flank, to endeavor to find out the whereabouts of the enemy, and draw thei
E. D. Baker (search for this): chapter 34
, were thrown into confusion, but speedily rallied by the efforts of their officers. The fighting was now conducted with a desperation on the part of the Wilson boys. They, however, did not fight with regard to order. Bush fighting was the mode adopted, and several of the Zouaves were seen to hold their ground against treble their number of opponents for over an entire hour. Various were the acts of daring and impetuous valor displayed in this unequal contest by the Federal troops. Lieutenant Baker, of Company F,. distinguished himself bravely throughout the whole struggle. Colonel Wilson fought valiantly. Captain Norman was cut off three times by the rebels from the main body, and would have been taken prisoner but for his cool and determined bravery. But for the steady action of the entire force they would no doubt have been cut to pieces. Capt. Hildt, of the regular army, with but eighty men under his command, it is conceded, did the most service of any officer in the a
William Shipley (search for this): chapter 34
the Zouaves, succeeded in getting some collected, and Col. Wilson also advanced — the enemy precipitately retreating. Major Arnold, with Capt. Robertson and Lieut. Shipley's companies, promptly followed, and attacked, as they were embarking, the other companies arriving up successively. Capt. Robertson opened a heavy fire, at short musket range, on the crowded masses, and Lieut. Shipley, some fifteen minutes later, joined him, and their fire must have been very effective. This was continued so long as they were within range. When they had got beyond it, the gallant Major ordered them to cease firing, and to give them three cheers, to which no responture of his superior, conducted the affair with great gallantry, prudence, and ability. He speaks in the highest terms of Captains Robertson and Hildt, and Lieutenants Shipley and Seely, and indeed of all the others whose names I give: Major Tower and Lieut. Reese, of the Engineers; Lieuts. Duryea, Langdon, Jackson, and Taylor, Un
William Wilson (search for this): chapter 34
s, succeeded in getting some collected, and Col. Wilson also advanced — the enemy precipitately ret General Anderson is severely wounded. Colonel Wilson's report. Sixth regiment N. Y. S. V.,derson led them on. Their war-cry was Death to Wilson. No quarter to Wilson's Zouaves. Five thousaWilson's Zouaves. Five thousand dollars was the reward for him dead or alive. All our loss is about twenty killed, fifteen wound to Tortugas and intermediate localities. Colonel Wilson and Lieutenant-Colonel Creighton were on t bravely throughout the whole struggle. Colonel Wilson fought valiantly. Captain Norman was cut he battle cry of the enemy was, No quarter for Wilson and his men; but they found that the first parunder arms. They advanced under command of Col. Wilson and Lieutenant-Colonel Creighton, and encouross over to the south beach, and so come upon Wilson's camp suddenly, without encountering the heavtteries. They first came upon and shot two of Wilson's picket guards and drove in the rest near the[9 more...]
Billy Wilson (search for this): chapter 34
returning, and all came back together. M. We set out, and before daylight were landed on Santa Rosa Island, among Billy Wilson's Zouaves, away below, and marched five miles, fighting several battles before we got off the island — losing several ne mass of smouldering ruins. The hospital structure is the only building now standing upon the Island of Santa Rosa. Wilson's New York Zouaves camp was the first one reached. The sentinels, completely surprised, were either killed or captured, ow over the head, which sent me rolling to the foot of the hill. We were in line again, and as friends were engaged with Wilson's Zouaves, and our misfortune had prevented the possibility of cutting off their retreat, we double quickened for those qey arrived there together, I suppose they will have to share the glory. As much fuss as the Northern papers have made of Wilson's Zouaves, and as proud as the United States is of such pets, I think them the most contemptibly cowardly wretches that e
Allen Casen (search for this): chapter 34
red at the same time, but I am satisfied that my shot took effect J. H. Pensacola, Fla., Oct. 10, 1861. The following is the list of casualties in the McDuffie Rifles, of Warrenton, Georgia, in the recent fight with the Federalists on Santa Rosa Island: Lieut. Shivers is absent; Lieut. Nelms died of a wound — he was shot through the lungs; 2d Sergeant Beddo died of his wounds; 1st Corporal Canton killed and left on the island; Private D. L. Cody missing, supposed to be killed; Privates Allen Casen and L. C. Wheeler wounded, but not dangerously;----Wall, E. E. Cody, and B. Smith wounded very slightly. There was warm work on the island, and a good many of the enemy were killed and wounded. The Fifth Georgia regiment behaved nobly, while the enemy acted cowardly. We have taken some prisoners — among them a Major. Another secession account. Mobile, Oct. 10. The special correspondent of the Mobile Advertiser writing last evening (Wednesday) at Pensacola, sends the fol
James Chadwick (search for this): chapter 34
. One of the officers, Lieut. Sayres, of the Louisiana Volunteers, was so severely wounded in the leg as to render amputation necessary. While the enemy were burning our camp their cry was, No quarter to Wilson's men! The officers' tents were pillaged and destroyed, and they, as well as their men, lost every thing they had except the clothes they stood in. Col. Wilson lost his clothes and money, but the regimental colors, which were in his tent, were saved by Quartermaster's Sergeant, James Chadwick, who rushed into the burning tent and brought the flag out safely. The regulars all fought exceedingly well. Captain Hildt's company, from the Third Infantry, particularly distinguished itself. Our total loss in killed, wounded, and missing is sixty-five, of whom there were ten Zouaves killed, nine wounded, and nineteen missing. The regiment lost all its tents, baggage, clothing, and ready money. All but the money and clothes, however, were replaced from the fort the next day, and th
E. E. Cody (search for this): chapter 34
Pensacola, Fla., Oct. 10, 1861. The following is the list of casualties in the McDuffie Rifles, of Warrenton, Georgia, in the recent fight with the Federalists on Santa Rosa Island: Lieut. Shivers is absent; Lieut. Nelms died of a wound — he was shot through the lungs; 2d Sergeant Beddo died of his wounds; 1st Corporal Canton killed and left on the island; Private D. L. Cody missing, supposed to be killed; Privates Allen Casen and L. C. Wheeler wounded, but not dangerously;----Wall, E. E. Cody, and B. Smith wounded very slightly. There was warm work on the island, and a good many of the enemy were killed and wounded. The Fifth Georgia regiment behaved nobly, while the enemy acted cowardly. We have taken some prisoners — among them a Major. Another secession account. Mobile, Oct. 10. The special correspondent of the Mobile Advertiser writing last evening (Wednesday) at Pensacola, sends the following details of the night attack of our forces on Santa Rosa Island:
s week. I don't feel well. I have got the diarrhea. We will want eight hundred uniforms. Your obedient servant, William Wilson, Colonel Commanding. Captain Norman's statement. The following account of the engagement was furnished by Captain Norman, of the Wilson Zouaves: On the morning of the 9th of October, at thCaptain Norman, of the Wilson Zouaves: On the morning of the 9th of October, at three o'clock, it being pitchy dark, the attack was made. On the evening previous to the fight the rebels landed five hundred men on the lower part of the island, and on the same evening two steamboats were noticed to leave Warrenton, which circumstances had the effect of putting the Zouaves a little on their guard. On the muster est by the Federal troops. Lieutenant Baker, of Company F,. distinguished himself bravely throughout the whole struggle. Colonel Wilson fought valiantly. Captain Norman was cut off three times by the rebels from the main body, and would have been taken prisoner but for his cool and determined bravery. But for the steady acti
John Bailey (search for this): chapter 34
ield-gun, which, however, did not reach him until the affair was over. As I propose only briefly to allude to the volunteers, I respectfully refer you to the official report, marked A, of the colonel of the regiment. The picket of this regiment and the guards sustained its principal if not entire loss, and behaved well. Capt. Daly's company, on duty with the regulars, did good service, and the Captain is spoken of by Major Arnold in terms of high approbation. He had two men killed. Capt. Bailey's company was at a battery, and not called out. He was performing his appropriate duty during the fight. Major Vogdes, with Companies A, First Artillery, and E, Third Infantry, proceeded beyond the Spanish fort, about a mile from this fort, when, from the obscurity of the night, he found himself and command completely intermingled with the enemy. He was immediately recognized, and made prisoner; the command devolving on Capt. Hildt, of the Third Infantry, who disengaged his command fr
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