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Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
he letter which are strictly of a private nature, and publish only such parts as exhibit a fiendish hatred toward men in Kentucky who have only offended in remaining loyal to their country and State. James Blackburn was a schoolmate of the editor, ahave left you and our children in the land of the despot, but God grant that I may soon be able to make the Union men of Kentucky feel the edge of my knife. From this day I hold every Union traitor as my enemy, and from him I scorn to receive quarte still in the Arkansas lines inactive, and if this proves to be true, I will tender my resignation and go immediately to Kentucky. I hope I will do my duty as a rebel and a freeman. Since I have the Union men of Kentucky I intend to begin the work Union men of Kentucky I intend to begin the work of murder in carnest, and if I ever spare one of them may hell be portion. I want to see Union blood flow deep enough for my horse to swim in. Your husband, James Blackburn. --Maysville Eagle, Nov.
Abington (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
a son of Edward Blackburn of Woodford County, and a brother-in-law of Thompson Flournoy, of Arkansas, in which State he has himself resided for several years. We have no doubt that the devilish and murderous spirit exhibited by the latter are shared by most of the renegades who have lifted their traitor hands against their native State, and all hesitating Union men may see from it what they have to expect if they shall ever be placed at the mercy of such men our quondam acquaintance: Abington, Va., Oct. 2, 1861. my dear wife: I have left you and our children in the land of the despot, but God grant that I may soon be able to make the Union men of Kentucky feel the edge of my knife. From this day I hold every Union traitor as my enemy, and from him I scorn to receive quarter, and to him I will never grant my soul in death, for they are cowards and villains enough. Brother Henry and I arrived here without hindrance. I have had chills all the way, but I hope to live to kill fo
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
en. Nelson with a request that it shall be published. In complying with the request we omit portions of the letter which are strictly of a private nature, and publish only such parts as exhibit a fiendish hatred toward men in Kentucky who have only offended in remaining loyal to their country and State. James Blackburn was a schoolmate of the editor, and our personal relations were friendly. He is a son of Edward Blackburn of Woodford County, and a brother-in-law of Thompson Flournoy, of Arkansas, in which State he has himself resided for several years. We have no doubt that the devilish and murderous spirit exhibited by the latter are shared by most of the renegades who have lifted their traitor hands against their native State, and all hesitating Union men may see from it what they have to expect if they shall ever be placed at the mercy of such men our quondam acquaintance: Abington, Va., Oct. 2, 1861. my dear wife: I have left you and our children in the land of the de
Woodford (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 154
r from James Blackburn to his wife has been sent to us by Gen. Nelson with a request that it shall be published. In complying with the request we omit portions of the letter which are strictly of a private nature, and publish only such parts as exhibit a fiendish hatred toward men in Kentucky who have only offended in remaining loyal to their country and State. James Blackburn was a schoolmate of the editor, and our personal relations were friendly. He is a son of Edward Blackburn of Woodford County, and a brother-in-law of Thompson Flournoy, of Arkansas, in which State he has himself resided for several years. We have no doubt that the devilish and murderous spirit exhibited by the latter are shared by most of the renegades who have lifted their traitor hands against their native State, and all hesitating Union men may see from it what they have to expect if they shall ever be placed at the mercy of such men our quondam acquaintance: Abington, Va., Oct. 2, 1861. my dear
Thompson Flournoy (search for this): chapter 154
n sent to us by Gen. Nelson with a request that it shall be published. In complying with the request we omit portions of the letter which are strictly of a private nature, and publish only such parts as exhibit a fiendish hatred toward men in Kentucky who have only offended in remaining loyal to their country and State. James Blackburn was a schoolmate of the editor, and our personal relations were friendly. He is a son of Edward Blackburn of Woodford County, and a brother-in-law of Thompson Flournoy, of Arkansas, in which State he has himself resided for several years. We have no doubt that the devilish and murderous spirit exhibited by the latter are shared by most of the renegades who have lifted their traitor hands against their native State, and all hesitating Union men may see from it what they have to expect if they shall ever be placed at the mercy of such men our quondam acquaintance: Abington, Va., Oct. 2, 1861. my dear wife: I have left you and our children in
Edward Blackburn (search for this): chapter 154
ed intercepted letter from James Blackburn to his wife has been sent to us by Gen. Nelson with a request that it shall be published. In complying with the request we omit portions of the letter which are strictly of a private nature, and publish only such parts as exhibit a fiendish hatred toward men in Kentucky who have only offended in remaining loyal to their country and State. James Blackburn was a schoolmate of the editor, and our personal relations were friendly. He is a son of Edward Blackburn of Woodford County, and a brother-in-law of Thompson Flournoy, of Arkansas, in which State he has himself resided for several years. We have no doubt that the devilish and murderous spirit exhibited by the latter are shared by most of the renegades who have lifted their traitor hands against their native State, and all hesitating Union men may see from it what they have to expect if they shall ever be placed at the mercy of such men our quondam acquaintance: Abington, Va., Oct. 2
, 1861. my dear wife: I have left you and our children in the land of the despot, but God grant that I may soon be able to make the Union men of Kentucky feel the edge of my knife. From this day I hold every Union traitor as my enemy, and from him I scorn to receive quarter, and to him I will never grant my soul in death, for they are cowards and villains enough. Brother Henry and I arrived here without hindrance. I have had chills all the way, but I hope to live to kill forty Yankees for every chill that I ever had. I learn that Hardee is still in the Arkansas lines inactive, and if this proves to be true, I will tender my resignation and go immediately to Kentucky. I hope I will do my duty as a rebel and a freeman. Since I have the Union men of Kentucky I intend to begin the work of murder in carnest, and if I ever spare one of them may hell be portion. I want to see Union blood flow deep enough for my horse to swim in. Your husband, James Blackburn. --Maysville Eagle, Nov.
The spirit of the rebels.--The subjoined intercepted letter from James Blackburn to his wife has been sent to us by Gen. Nelson with a request that it shall be published. In complying with the request we omit portions of the letter which are strictly of a private nature, and publish only such parts as exhibit a fiendish hatred toward men in Kentucky who have only offended in remaining loyal to their country and State. James Blackburn was a schoolmate of the editor, and our personal relations were friendly. He is a son of Edward Blackburn of Woodford County, and a brother-in-law of Thompson Flournoy, of Arkansas, in which State he has himself resided for several years. We have no doubt that the devilish and murderous spirit exhibited by the latter are shared by most of the renegades who have lifted their traitor hands against their native State, and all hesitating Union men may see from it what they have to expect if they shall ever be placed at the mercy of such men our quonda
James Blackburn (search for this): chapter 154
The spirit of the rebels.--The subjoined intercepted letter from James Blackburn to his wife has been sent to us by Gen. Nelson with a request that it shall be published. In complying with the request we omit portions of the letter which are strictly of a private nature, and publish only such parts as exhibit a fiendish hatred toward men in Kentucky who have only offended in remaining loyal to their country and State. James Blackburn was a schoolmate of the editor, and our personal relations were friendly. He is a son of Edward Blackburn of Woodford County, and a brother-in-law of Thompson Flournoy, of Arkansas, in which State he has himself resided fto Kentucky. I hope I will do my duty as a rebel and a freeman. Since I have the Union men of Kentucky I intend to begin the work of murder in carnest, and if I ever spare one of them may hell be portion. I want to see Union blood flow deep enough for my horse to swim in. Your husband, James Blackburn. --Maysville Eagle, Nov.
October 2nd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 154
lackburn of Woodford County, and a brother-in-law of Thompson Flournoy, of Arkansas, in which State he has himself resided for several years. We have no doubt that the devilish and murderous spirit exhibited by the latter are shared by most of the renegades who have lifted their traitor hands against their native State, and all hesitating Union men may see from it what they have to expect if they shall ever be placed at the mercy of such men our quondam acquaintance: Abington, Va., Oct. 2, 1861. my dear wife: I have left you and our children in the land of the despot, but God grant that I may soon be able to make the Union men of Kentucky feel the edge of my knife. From this day I hold every Union traitor as my enemy, and from him I scorn to receive quarter, and to him I will never grant my soul in death, for they are cowards and villains enough. Brother Henry and I arrived here without hindrance. I have had chills all the way, but I hope to live to kill forty Yankees for e
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