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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
as brought to the door, when the lady told Mr. Wells that the horse was at his service, and would safely carry him through. Said she, Take the horse, and go to Washington. You may leave him with my son --giving his name and residence. If a secessionist meets you, shoot him; if there is more than one, shoot the first, and trust to the horse for the other, for he will soon carry you out of danger. Mr. Wells mounted the horse, and safely reached Washington. He left the horse as directed, and was welcomed by the son as he had been by the mother. While Mr. Wells was waiting, a Unionist of the vicinity came into the house, and said he was about to leave for Washington; that he had sent his family over, and had stayed behind to see if it was possible to save any thing. The lady asked him if he had any money. He said he had not. She then went up stairs, and returning with a purse of silver, gave it to the gentleman, remarking, Take this; you may as well have it as the secessionis
Job H. Wells (search for this): chapter 18
A good Samaritan.--Private Job H. Wells, of Company C, was lost in the confusion of the troops at the battle of Bull Run. He got into the woods, and soon after t Soon after breakfast, a troop of secessionists came in sight. The lady put Mr. Wells in a rear room, while she conversed with some of them. She feigned great ignng on, and learned from them the route they were going. After they had gone, Mr. Wells inquired how he was to get away. That is easy enough, replied the matron; tro serve him on the way. The horse was brought to the door, when the lady told Mr. Wells that the horse was at his service, and would safely carry him through. Said trust to the horse for the other, for he will soon carry you out of danger. Mr. Wells mounted the horse, and safely reached Washington. He left the horse as directed, and was welcomed by the son as he had been by the mother. While Mr. Wells was waiting, a Unionist of the vicinity came into the house, and said he was about
welcomed by the son as he had been by the mother. While Mr. Wells was waiting, a Unionist of the vicinity came into the house, and said he was about to leave for Washington; that he had sent his family over, and had stayed behind to see if it was possible to save any thing. The lady asked him if he had any money. He said he had not. She then went up stairs, and returning with a purse of silver, gave it to the gentleman, remarking, Take this; you may as well have it as the secessionists. They have already divided my property, and apportioned it among themselves; but the first man that makes the attempt, I shall shoot. Doubtless there are many such noble women in Virginia and elsewhere, who are now suffering daily and nightly through fears of the force and violence of the secessionists. It is for these we fight, as well as ourselves. Let the remembrance of this fact nerve our arms for the conflict, and impel us to speedily give them deliverance.--Providence Journal, Aug. 2.