hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 120 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 65 1 Browse Search
Nov 58 0 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 54 0 Browse Search
Yankee Doodle 54 0 Browse Search
Oct 54 0 Browse Search
Dec 52 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 50 0 Browse Search
Abe Lincoln 48 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 45 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 5 total hits in 3 results.

Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 61
d commemorate an incident very touching and beautiful, which rests upon the best authority, and which ought to be known. Colonel Mulligan refused his parole at Lexington, and his wife resolved to share his captivity. Accordingly she left her infant, fourteen months old, in the care of one of the strongest secessionist women in the town. That woman assumed the charge of the little child, and dressed it in the captured American flag. The fight had ceased! The cannon's roar Was silent on Missouri's shore; The leader and his band so brave Had turned from walls they could not save-- When voice was heard of sore lament, A mother o'er her baby bent, And fast the bitter tears were shed That fell upon his little head: “Thy father yields his post and sword, But rebels shall not have his word; In prison rather ling'ring lie, Than yield the right to fight and die! “And faithful love shall follow there, His hard captivity to share; But thee, my boy! such fate for thee! Like fettered cherub
n commemorated in the heroic song of Homer, and have been eagerly caught and honored in every age by the human heart. They bid us hope, too, that the present contest grows, in part, out of mutual misapprehension of the purposes and spirit of the two sections of the country arrayed against each other. The following lines were written by a lady of Stock-bridge, and commemorate an incident very touching and beautiful, which rests upon the best authority, and which ought to be known. Colonel Mulligan refused his parole at Lexington, and his wife resolved to share his captivity. Accordingly she left her infant, fourteen months old, in the care of one of the strongest secessionist women in the town. That woman assumed the charge of the little child, and dressed it in the captured American flag. The fight had ceased! The cannon's roar Was silent on Missouri's shore; The leader and his band so brave Had turned from walls they could not save-- When voice was heard of sore lament, A mo
29. an incident of the war. There are bright spots in the darkness of war. Deeds of mercy by an enemy shed lustre on our common humanity. They have been commemorated in the heroic song of Homer, and have been eagerly caught and honored in every age by the human heart. They bid us hope, too, that the present contest grows, in part, out of mutual misapprehension of the purposes and spirit of the two sections of the country arrayed against each other. The following lines were written by a lady of Stock-bridge, and commemorate an incident very touching and beautiful, which rests upon the best authority, and which ought to be known. Colonel Mulligan refused his parole at Lexington, and his wife resolved to share his captivity. Accordingly she left her infant, fourteen months old, in the care of one of the strongest secessionist women in the town. That woman assumed the charge of the little child, and dressed it in the captured American flag. The fight had ceased! The canno