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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Marblehead (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
A patriotic family.--David Norton, of Candia, N. H., has all his sons-William C., David T., Richard E., and Henry C.--in the Federal army. Mr. Norton himself served in the war of 1812, and was on duty at Marblehead when the ship Constitution was chased into port by two British seventy-four gun ships. His father, Mr. Simon Norton, who was born at Chester, N. H., 1760, enlisted when fifteen years of age, and served throughout the Revolutionary War. He was in the battles at Bunker's Hill and at Bennington, and went South under General Washington. In 1775 and 1776 he was in Breed's regiment, under Capt. Emerson, of Candia. Henry C., the youngest son, seventeen years old, was in the battle of Bull Run under Colonel Marston, of the New Hampshire Second, and was there wounded by a rifle ball. The ball tore away his hat band, and, glancing along the skull several inches, lodged there and was not extracted till he reached Washington, he walking the whole distance. The next morning the
Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
A patriotic family.--David Norton, of Candia, N. H., has all his sons-William C., David T., Richard E., and Henry C.--in the Federal army. Mr. Norton himself served in the war of 1812, and was on duty at Marblehead when the ship Constitution was chased into port by two British seventy-four gun ships. His father, Mr. Simon Norton, who was born at Chester, N. H., 1760, enlisted when fifteen years of age, and served throughout the Revolutionary War. He was in the battles at Bunker's Hill and at Bennington, and went South under General Washington. In 1775 and 1776 he was in Breed's regiment, under Capt. Emerson, of Candia. Henry C., the youngest son, seventeen years old, was in the battle of Bull Run under Colonel Marston, of the New Hampshire Second, and was there wounded by a rifle ball. The ball tore away his hat band, and, glancing along the skull several inches, lodged there and was not extracted till he reached Washington, he walking the whole distance. The next morning th
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
rmy. Mr. Norton himself served in the war of 1812, and was on duty at Marblehead when the ship Constitution was chased into port by two British seventy-four gun ships. His father, Mr. Simon Norton, who was born at Chester, N. H., 1760, enlisted when fifteen years of age, and served throughout the Revolutionary War. He was in the battles at Bunker's Hill and at Bennington, and went South under General Washington. In 1775 and 1776 he was in Breed's regiment, under Capt. Emerson, of Candia. Henry C., the youngest son, seventeen years old, was in the battle of Bull Run under Colonel Marston, of the New Hampshire Second, and was there wounded by a rifle ball. The ball tore away his hat band, and, glancing along the skull several inches, lodged there and was not extracted till he reached Washington, he walking the whole distance. The next morning the brave young soldier was ready for duty. Neither Mr. Norton nor his father ever received a pension. Such patriotism is worthy of record
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 79
mself served in the war of 1812, and was on duty at Marblehead when the ship Constitution was chased into port by two British seventy-four gun ships. His father, Mr. Simon Norton, who was born at Chester, N. H., 1760, enlisted when fifteen years of age, and served throughout the Revolutionary War. He was in the battles at Bunker's Hill and at Bennington, and went South under General Washington. In 1775 and 1776 he was in Breed's regiment, under Capt. Emerson, of Candia. Henry C., the youngest son, seventeen years old, was in the battle of Bull Run under Colonel Marston, of the New Hampshire Second, and was there wounded by a rifle ball. The ball tore away his hat band, and, glancing along the skull several inches, lodged there and was not extracted till he reached Washington, he walking the whole distance. The next morning the brave young soldier was ready for duty. Neither Mr. Norton nor his father ever received a pension. Such patriotism is worthy of record.--Boston Journal.
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
A patriotic family.--David Norton, of Candia, N. H., has all his sons-William C., David T., Richard E., and Henry C.--in the Federal army. Mr. Norton himself served in the war of 1812, and was on duty at Marblehead when the ship Constitution was chased into port by two British seventy-four gun ships. His father, Mr. Simon Norton, who was born at Chester, N. H., 1760, enlisted when fifteen years of age, and served throughout the Revolutionary War. He was in the battles at Bunker's Hill and at Bennington, and went South under General Washington. In 1775 and 1776 he was in Breed's regiment, under Capt. Emerson, of Candia. Henry C., the youngest son, seventeen years old, was in the battle of Bull Run under Colonel Marston, of the New Hampshire Second, and was there wounded by a rifle ball. The ball tore away his hat band, and, glancing along the skull several inches, lodged there and was not extracted till he reached Washington, he walking the whole distance. The next morning th
Bennington, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
triotic family.--David Norton, of Candia, N. H., has all his sons-William C., David T., Richard E., and Henry C.--in the Federal army. Mr. Norton himself served in the war of 1812, and was on duty at Marblehead when the ship Constitution was chased into port by two British seventy-four gun ships. His father, Mr. Simon Norton, who was born at Chester, N. H., 1760, enlisted when fifteen years of age, and served throughout the Revolutionary War. He was in the battles at Bunker's Hill and at Bennington, and went South under General Washington. In 1775 and 1776 he was in Breed's regiment, under Capt. Emerson, of Candia. Henry C., the youngest son, seventeen years old, was in the battle of Bull Run under Colonel Marston, of the New Hampshire Second, and was there wounded by a rifle ball. The ball tore away his hat band, and, glancing along the skull several inches, lodged there and was not extracted till he reached Washington, he walking the whole distance. The next morning the brave y
Chester, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 79
A patriotic family.--David Norton, of Candia, N. H., has all his sons-William C., David T., Richard E., and Henry C.--in the Federal army. Mr. Norton himself served in the war of 1812, and was on duty at Marblehead when the ship Constitution was chased into port by two British seventy-four gun ships. His father, Mr. Simon Norton, who was born at Chester, N. H., 1760, enlisted when fifteen years of age, and served throughout the Revolutionary War. He was in the battles at Bunker's Hill and at Bennington, and went South under General Washington. In 1775 and 1776 he was in Breed's regiment, under Capt. Emerson, of Candia. Henry C., the youngest son, seventeen years old, was in the battle of Bull Run under Colonel Marston, of the New Hampshire Second, and was there wounded by a rifle ball. The ball tore away his hat band, and, glancing along the skull several inches, lodged there and was not extracted till he reached Washington, he walking the whole distance. The next morning the
Simon Norton (search for this): chapter 79
iam C., David T., Richard E., and Henry C.--in the Federal army. Mr. Norton himself served in the war of 1812, and was on duty at Marblehead when the ship Constitution was chased into port by two British seventy-four gun ships. His father, Mr. Simon Norton, who was born at Chester, N. H., 1760, enlisted when fifteen years of age, and served throughout the Revolutionary War. He was in the battles at Bunker's Hill and at Bennington, and went South under General Washington. In 1775 and 1776 he w son, seventeen years old, was in the battle of Bull Run under Colonel Marston, of the New Hampshire Second, and was there wounded by a rifle ball. The ball tore away his hat band, and, glancing along the skull several inches, lodged there and was not extracted till he reached Washington, he walking the whole distance. The next morning the brave young soldier was ready for duty. Neither Mr. Norton nor his father ever received a pension. Such patriotism is worthy of record.--Boston Journal.
self served in the war of 1812, and was on duty at Marblehead when the ship Constitution was chased into port by two British seventy-four gun ships. His father, Mr. Simon Norton, who was born at Chester, N. H., 1760, enlisted when fifteen years of age, and served throughout the Revolutionary War. He was in the battles at Bunker's Hill and at Bennington, and went South under General Washington. In 1775 and 1776 he was in Breed's regiment, under Capt. Emerson, of Candia. Henry C., the youngest son, seventeen years old, was in the battle of Bull Run under Colonel Marston, of the New Hampshire Second, and was there wounded by a rifle ball. The ball tore away his hat band, and, glancing along the skull several inches, lodged there and was not extracted till he reached Washington, he walking the whole distance. The next morning the brave young soldier was ready for duty. Neither Mr. Norton nor his father ever received a pension. Such patriotism is worthy of record.--Boston Journal.
ry C.--in the Federal army. Mr. Norton himself served in the war of 1812, and was on duty at Marblehead when the ship Constitution was chased into port by two British seventy-four gun ships. His father, Mr. Simon Norton, who was born at Chester, N. H., 1760, enlisted when fifteen years of age, and served throughout the Revolutionary War. He was in the battles at Bunker's Hill and at Bennington, and went South under General Washington. In 1775 and 1776 he was in Breed's regiment, under Capt. Emerson, of Candia. Henry C., the youngest son, seventeen years old, was in the battle of Bull Run under Colonel Marston, of the New Hampshire Second, and was there wounded by a rifle ball. The ball tore away his hat band, and, glancing along the skull several inches, lodged there and was not extracted till he reached Washington, he walking the whole distance. The next morning the brave young soldier was ready for duty. Neither Mr. Norton nor his father ever received a pension. Such patriot
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