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nds force to Charles City Court-House, 618; attempts to surprise Richmond, 619-620. Woodbury, Judge, Levi, 117; the motion of, 1007. Wool, Maj.-Gen. John E., assigned to Fortress Monroe, 278, 281; receives report of capture of Fort Hatteras, 286; reference to, 877, 893. woods' Twenty-Third South Carolina, reference to, 679. Woolford, Captain, 597. Worcester (Mass.) Battalion at Annapolis, 210. Worrall, Alexander, at Fortress Monroe, 251. Wright, repulses attack on Washington, 628; reference to, 687, 858. Wright's Corps, ordered to destroy Petersburg Railroad, 688. Y Yeadon, Richard, offers a reward of $10,000 for Butler, dead or alive, 547. yellow fever, Butler first hears and is instructed in treatment of, 42-43. Yorktown, white troops concentrated at, 638; embark at, 639; speculative trade carried on. at, 843. young, John Russell, U. S. minister to China, in Around the world with General Grant, 862-863. young's Battery of artillery, 679. Zzz
Zephaniah (search for this): chapter 3
tten or by whom begot? is, and ought to be, of no consequence to any individual, or to his peers. My paternal grandfather was born in Woodbury, Connecticut, of Irish descent, and of a most strictly Irish Presbyterian family, as his own name Zephaniah, and his uncles', Levi and Malachi, most plainly show. The branches of the family were numerous, and the names of those who were of the proper generation to take part in the War of the Revolution, will be found in the local history of that contest wherever Connecticut men took part, whether in Pennsylvania or Wyoming, or in the western reserve of Ohio. Zephaniah went to Quebec with Wolfe, and I have the powder-horn which he bore, dated April 22, 1758. He went from Connecticut to the town of Nottingham in New Hampshire, and married Abigail, daughter of General Joseph Cilley. They had several children, the youngest of whom was John, my father, who was born May 17, 1782. He married Sarah Batchelder, of Deerfield, New Hampshire,
Zephaniah (search for this): chapter 4
, and in the most important of all his father had taken an active part. The colonies had, in 1758, the French and Indian War, the result of which was the taking of Quebec by Wolfe, and the destruction of the power of France on this continent. Zephaniah, my grandfather, was a soldier under Wolfe's command. There hangs before me, in my library, a powder-horn, such as was worn by every soldier of that day. On it is engraved with his own knife, Zephaniah Butler his horn April ye 22, 1758. And CCaptain Zephaniah fought with Stark at Bennington. Then followed the Revolution, from 1775 to 1783, and one of my uncles was at Bunker Hill. The next generation saw the war of 1812 with Great Britain. In this war, my father, John Butler, commanded a company of light dragoons in the regular army. Next, in 1830, were the Spanish wars in Florida and the Gulf States, wherein General Taylor and General Jackson--then captains — so distinguished themselves. Next came the unpleasantness of 1861 t
John Russell Young (search for this): chapter 17
road. General Kautz reports again that he captured all there were of Taliaferro's cavalry outside of the intrenchments. Wise further adds that he had the following additional forces: Major Archer's corps of reserves, second-class militia, and one howitzer under the command of Brigadier-General Colston, which forces he puts at less than one hundred and fifty; one company of convalescents of say a hundred men more, with say one hundred men for the two batteries of artillery, Graham's and Young's, and say one hundred and twenty men more for a company of convalescents, and a company of penitents. Penitents are soldiers who have been tried by court-martial and committed to prison for their crimes. In some emergencies at Richmond and Petersburg they were released and formed into companies to fight in defence of their prison. How much they would fight after they got a chance to run away need not be discussed. These, then, constituted the entire number of men south of the Appomatto
John Russell Young (search for this): chapter 20
aster in my movements,--let us see, I say, what were Grant's opinions of me and what his view of my military acts in his cool judgment when written through another pen than that of Badeau. In his voyage to the East, he was accompanied by Mr. John Russell Young, afterwards United States Minister to China, as his personal and valued friend. Mr. Young made minutes of his conversations, which with Grant's permission were afterwards published. In one of these Grant said:-- I have always regrettMr. Young made minutes of his conversations, which with Grant's permission were afterwards published. In one of these Grant said:-- I have always regretted the censure that unwittingly came upon Butler in that campaign, and my report was the cause. I said that General Butler was bottled up, and used the phrase without meaning to annoy the General or give his enemies a weapon. I liked Butler and have always found him not only, as all the world knows, a man of great ability, but a patriotic man, and a man of courage, honor, and sincere convictions. Butler lacked the technical experience of a military education, and it is very possible to be a
Richard Yeadon (search for this): chapter 14
and having ordered that the said Benjamin F. Butler be considered or treated as an outlaw and common enemy of mankind, and that in the event of his capture, the officer in command of the capturing force do cause him to Door-plate taken from Richard Yeadon's residence. be immediately executed by hanging, the undersigned hereby offers a reward of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) for the capture and delivery of the said Benjamin F. Butler, dead or alive, to any proper Confederate authority. RichardRichard Yeadon. Charleston, S. C., January 1. He did not get my head, but I did afterwards send for him, but got only his door-plate, the man himself having run away. The she publication was from the Charleston Courier:-- A daughter of South Carolina writes to the Courier from Darlington District:-- I propose to spin the thread to make the cord to execute the order of our noble president, Davis, when old Butler is caught, and my daughter asks that she may be allowed to adjust it around h
Richard Yeadon (search for this): chapter 26
nds force to Charles City Court-House, 618; attempts to surprise Richmond, 619-620. Woodbury, Judge, Levi, 117; the motion of, 1007. Wool, Maj.-Gen. John E., assigned to Fortress Monroe, 278, 281; receives report of capture of Fort Hatteras, 286; reference to, 877, 893. woods' Twenty-Third South Carolina, reference to, 679. Woolford, Captain, 597. Worcester (Mass.) Battalion at Annapolis, 210. Worrall, Alexander, at Fortress Monroe, 251. Wright, repulses attack on Washington, 628; reference to, 687, 858. Wright's Corps, ordered to destroy Petersburg Railroad, 688. Y Yeadon, Richard, offers a reward of $10,000 for Butler, dead or alive, 547. yellow fever, Butler first hears and is instructed in treatment of, 42-43. Yorktown, white troops concentrated at, 638; embark at, 639; speculative trade carried on. at, 843. young, John Russell, U. S. minister to China, in Around the world with General Grant, 862-863. young's Battery of artillery, 679. Zzz
eans known as French-town, which was then, perhaps, the most filthy of all, a poor soldier from Maine, homesick, dreaming of the pure air and bright land-scape of his native State and pining to return thereto, was pacing his weary beat. Naturally he listened to the conversation that went on around him, and accordingly he was attacked in this way: Two newsboys stood near him and one said: Jack, have you heard the news? No, Tom, what is it? Got the yellow fever prime down in Frenchtown; two Yanks dead already. It will sweep them all off. No surgeon in my army ever saw a case of yellow fever or had any instruction in meeting this hideous foe. A panic seized many of my officers. There were still other reasons for them to pine for home. New troops were being raised, and as the Army of the Gulf had acquired some reputation, the governors of all States, save Massachusetts, were glad to get officers from my army to promote into these new regiments. So, if they could but get home, th
er. George C. strong, A. A. General. This brought the proprietor to headquarters with a very proper and humble apology, and the order of suspension was revoked. There were several attempts on the part of the people not to have any intercourse with our soldiers, nor to trade with them. One of the privates went into a shoe store to buy a pair of shoes and asked the price. They were three dollars. He offered the gold for them and the man replied that he would not sell shoes to a d — d Yankee. The next day the provost marshal put a red flag over the shoe store door and sold its contents at auction. That shopkeeper's experiment was not a happy one. But very soon there was no uncivil treatment received by our soldiers except from the upper class of women. But to return to our. meeting. I read my proclamation to the city officials. Pierre Soule, late United States senator and minister to Spain, was put forth as their spokesman. Mr. Soule did not complain of the proclamation
ost successful and best known surgeons of the country. Two others became reputable and somewhat distinguished citizens. The remaining one is the writer. The Rev. Mr. Edson was the foster father of this school, and brought for us our teacher, Thomas N. Clark, a graduate of Yale. Mr. Clark taught us for nearly two years, and with him we went into the new schoolhouse. The numbers of the school increasing with the same rapidity as the new town, he brought to his assistance a classmate from Yale, Mr. Clapp, who afterwards left our school to go to Charleston, South Carolina, where he finally became the editor of the Charleston Mercury. He was the most bitter proslavery and states-right gentleman I ever knew, and his cutting sarcasms permeated every page of his writing. In his early life he happened to be bitten in the heel by a rattlesnake. He did not die from the bite, but those whom he did not like said the venom of the poison remained in him. For some reason, which as a boy I ne
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