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Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 1
Publishers' Preface. General Butler has said in his introduction that every point is to be proven. This has necessitated a large staff of workers to carefully search the records of the War Depadent that the plans we shall adopt will enable us to enforce it. Guarantee to subscribers. Butler's Book is published as a subscription book and to be sold by us only as such through our agents,we consulted the most eminent legal talent, and in answer received the following letter from General Butler, which will doubtless be received with more than ordinary interest, containing as it does thy subscription, a method which is of great value to the public. Truly yours, (Signed) Benj. F. Butler. All agents for Butler's book enter into an agreement :-- Not to sell or deliver dirButler's book enter into an agreement :-- Not to sell or deliver directly or indirectly, a copy of this work to anyone who does not actually subscribe for it for his own private use, and not for resale, and not knowingly to supply a copy, directly or indirectly, to an
A. M. Thayer (search for this): chapter 1
gree to refund to each subscriber the difference between the regular retail price and such reduced price. (Signed,) A. M. Thayer and Co. Boston, Mass., Feb. 1, 1892. This guarantee, which appears in every copy, is, we believe, the first guarannary interest, containing as it does the opinion of a lawyer second to none in the world:-- Boston, Oct. 5, 1891. A. M. Thayer & Co., 6 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. Gentlemen:--I have taken note of the performances now going on by publishersase any book is found in a bookstore, dry-goods store, public library or other place it will be easy to determine by A. M. Thayer and Col., publishers, Boston, Mass. reference to our records into whose hands the book was given and we will at once cplaced a notice on a number of pages at the beginning of the work. Trusting that all will co-operate with us to the utmost in securing the fullest possible protection, we are Very truly yours, A. M. Thayer & Co., publishers, Boston, Mass.
February 1st, 1892 AD (search for this): chapter 1
scription book and to be sold by us only as such through our agents, and at prices appearing in our prospectus or on our circulars. Should we at any time offer or advertise this work for sale in book-stores, dry-goods stores, etc., at reduced price, or sell it to be sold, or given away as premiums for magazines, newspapers, etc., we agree to refund to each subscriber the difference between the regular retail price and such reduced price. (Signed,) A. M. Thayer and Co. Boston, Mass., Feb. 1, 1892. This guarantee, which appears in every copy, is, we believe, the first guarantee of a tangible, monetary value ever given to subscribers of subscription books, that the promises made by publishers or their agents are to be carried out. To protect our subscribers and agents, we consulted the most eminent legal talent, and in answer received the following letter from General Butler, which will doubtless be received with more than ordinary interest, containing as it does the opinion
October 5th, 1891 AD (search for this): chapter 1
e believe, the first guarantee of a tangible, monetary value ever given to subscribers of subscription books, that the promises made by publishers or their agents are to be carried out. To protect our subscribers and agents, we consulted the most eminent legal talent, and in answer received the following letter from General Butler, which will doubtless be received with more than ordinary interest, containing as it does the opinion of a lawyer second to none in the world:-- Boston, Oct. 5, 1891. A. M. Thayer & Co., 6 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. Gentlemen:--I have taken note of the performances now going on by publishers of important books, who, after they have made solemn engagements that their books shall be sold only by subscription, and put enormous prices on them upon that pledge, by which assurance the reading public have made purchases to the amount of some millions of dollars, have turned around, and, advertising that the exact copyright work will be given to anybody
Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
for any damages done us or our business by transfer. If, therefore, any copy is sold or delivered by the agent to dealers or other persons for resale or exposure in public libraries or for purposes other than private use, he transfers property that does not belong to him, for which offence both agent, subscriber, bookseller, or receiver are liable. In case any book is found in a bookstore, dry-goods store, public library or other place it will be easy to determine by A. M. Thayer and Col., publishers, Boston, Mass. reference to our records into whose hands the book was given and we will at once call the guilty parties to account. Each book contains a stamp of the Publishers & Booksellers' Protective Association, registered and numbered consecutively, placed in plain sight on the inside of the cover and a corresponding stamp so placed and combined with the book that the mark cannot be erased or tampered with without destroying the book. We keep a record of these numbers and s
Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
subscriber the difference between the regular retail price and such reduced price. (Signed,) A. M. Thayer and Co. Boston, Mass., Feb. 1, 1892. This guarantee, which appears in every copy, is, we believe, the first guarantee of a tangible, moe opinion of a lawyer second to none in the world:-- Boston, Oct. 5, 1891. A. M. Thayer & Co., 6 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. Gentlemen:--I have taken note of the performances now going on by publishers of important books, who, after they h, dry-goods store, public library or other place it will be easy to determine by A. M. Thayer and Col., publishers, Boston, Mass. reference to our records into whose hands the book was given and we will at once call the guilty parties to account. placed a notice on a number of pages at the beginning of the work. Trusting that all will co-operate with us to the utmost in securing the fullest possible protection, we are Very truly yours, A. M. Thayer & Co., publishers, Boston, Mass.
Benj F. Butler (search for this): chapter 2
Dedicatory. to the good and brave soldiers of the grand Army of the Republic, This book is dedicated by their comrade, a slight token of appreciation of the patriotic devotion to loyalty and gallant heroism with which they endured the hardships and fought the battles of their country during the War of the Rebellion, to preserve its existence and perpetuity as a nation of freemen, the proudest exemplar of a people solely governed by themselves, able to sustain that government as more powerful than any nation of the earth. Upon our efforts and their success depended the future of free institutions as a governmental power, giving the boon of liberty to all the peoples. Other republics have flourished for a season, been split in fragments, or merged in despotisms, and failure would have closed forever the experiment of a government by the people for the people. Benj F. Butler.
f the Supreme Court of Judicature of New Hampshire. He is still in healthful, vigorous old age, with a mind clear, thoughtful, and comprehensive, and, in 1889, gives promise of a much further prolongation of life, a promise which all hope will be fulfilled. This venerable man has done a thing the like of which no man ever will do again, upon the doctrine of chances: he voted in 1840 as presidential elector for the election of William Henry Harrison as President of the United States, and, in 1888, forty eight years after, as such elector, voted to make president his grandson, Benjamin Harrison. Judge Nesmith died in 1890, since this paragraph was written. Nay, so potent were the Scotch Irish Presbyterians in the councils of New Hampshire, and so intense was their hatred of popery, that in the constitutional convention of 1784, which organized the province as a State of the United States, they were enabled to have inserted in the Constitution (which in almost all things else cop
men who have stood out before the country as representatives of New Hampshire will be found to be descendants, either lineally or collaterally, from these progenitors. One of the descendants of the Scotch Presbyterians, or one might say almost a contemporary, because he was born with the century, is Hon. George W. Nesmith, late Justice of the Supreme Court of Judicature of New Hampshire. He is still in healthful, vigorous old age, with a mind clear, thoughtful, and comprehensive, and, in 1889, gives promise of a much further prolongation of life, a promise which all hope will be fulfilled. This venerable man has done a thing the like of which no man ever will do again, upon the doctrine of chances: he voted in 1840 as presidential elector for the election of William Henry Harrison as President of the United States, and, in 1888, forty eight years after, as such elector, voted to make president his grandson, Benjamin Harrison. Judge Nesmith died in 1890, since this paragraph wa
d comprehensive, and, in 1889, gives promise of a much further prolongation of life, a promise which all hope will be fulfilled. This venerable man has done a thing the like of which no man ever will do again, upon the doctrine of chances: he voted in 1840 as presidential elector for the election of William Henry Harrison as President of the United States, and, in 1888, forty eight years after, as such elector, voted to make president his grandson, Benjamin Harrison. Judge Nesmith died in 1890, since this paragraph was written. Nay, so potent were the Scotch Irish Presbyterians in the councils of New Hampshire, and so intense was their hatred of popery, that in the constitutional convention of 1784, which organized the province as a State of the United States, they were enabled to have inserted in the Constitution (which in almost all things else copied the Constitution of Massachusetts of 1783) clauses enacting that every officer of the State, elective or appointive, must prof
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