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udgment, ever did misunderstand it or misinterpret how the order intended that such women should be dealt with, or that it was the slightest suggestion that she be dealt with in any other way than being put in the hands of the police. Brig.-Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson, M. S. G., in answer to a letter from me about his kind treat ment of a prisoner, gives this testimony:-- depot of prisoners of War, Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, O., Oct. 12, 1863. General.--Your kind letter of the 6th instant was received on the 10th. You say that no one more surely than myself knows that the acts for which my government blames you were untruly reported and unjustly construed. What your intentions were when you issued the order which brought so much censure upon yourself I, of course, cannot tell; but I can testify, and do with pleasure, that nearly all of the many persons who passed through my lines, to and from New Orleans, during the months of August and September, 1862, spoke favorably
and it or misinterpret how the order intended that such women should be dealt with, or that it was the slightest suggestion that she be dealt with in any other way than being put in the hands of the police. Brig.-Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson, M. S. G., in answer to a letter from me about his kind treat ment of a prisoner, gives this testimony:-- depot of prisoners of War, Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, O., Oct. 12, 1863. General.--Your kind letter of the 6th instant was received on the 10th. You say that no one more surely than myself knows that the acts for which my government blames you were untruly reported and unjustly construed. What your intentions were when you issued the order which brought so much censure upon yourself I, of course, cannot tell; but I can testify, and do with pleasure, that nearly all of the many persons who passed through my lines, to and from New Orleans, during the months of August and September, 1862, spoke favorably of the treatment they had re
ght and signed a written confession, and the property was substantially all recovered. A notice was put in the newspapers for everybody whose house had been robbed to come to the provost marshal's office and identify their property and take it. Everything was restored except three or four hundred dollars that they had spent out of the money. They had up to that time made no division of spoils. I then, by General Order 98, sentenced three of them to be executed at the parish prison on the 16th. The next day I tried the rest of them and they were convicted, and substantially confessed all. Five of them in all were condemned to execution. One, a boy, at the intercession of his mother and upon evidence that he had not been a bad boy before his connection with the gang, and being only a sort of page for them, I sentenced to prison for a short term. The man that confessed and turned State's evidence, as is the phrase, I sentenced to Ship Island at hard labor for five years. The re
ry, 1862. In October, 1861, the city had voted to erect a battery out of this defence fund. On the 19th of February, 1862, the city council, by vote published and commented upon in the newspapers, placed in the hands of the Confederate General Lovell, fifty thousand dollars, to be expended by him in the defences of the city. It will, therefore, clearly appear that all the inhabitants of the city knew that the city council was raising and expending large sums for war purposes. On the 20th of the same February, the city council raised an extraordinary Committee of public safety, from the body of the inhabitants at large, consisting of sixty members, for the purpose of co-operating with the Confederate and State authorities in devising means for the defence of the city and its approaches. On the 27th of the same February, the city council adopted a series of resolutions:-- 1st. Recommending the issue of one million dollars of city bonds, for the purpose of purchasing arm
f the city. It will, therefore, clearly appear that all the inhabitants of the city knew that the city council was raising and expending large sums for war purposes. On the 20th of the same February, the city council raised an extraordinary Committee of public safety, from the body of the inhabitants at large, consisting of sixty members, for the purpose of co-operating with the Confederate and State authorities in devising means for the defence of the city and its approaches. On the 27th of the same February, the city council adopted a series of resolutions:-- 1st. Recommending the issue of one million dollars of city bonds, for the purpose of purchasing arms and munitions of war, and to provide for the successful defence of the city and its approaches. 2d. To appropriate twenty-five thousand dollars for the purpose of uniforming and equipping soldiers mustered into the service of the country. 3d. Pledging the council to support the families of all soldiers who s
d dollars, to be expended by him in the defences of the city. It will, therefore, clearly appear that all the inhabitants of the city knew that the city council was raising and expending large sums for war purposes. On the 20th of the same February, the city council raised an extraordinary Committee of public safety, from the body of the inhabitants at large, consisting of sixty members, for the purpose of co-operating with the Confederate and State authorities in devising means for the defence of the city and its approaches. On the 27th of the same February, the city council adopted a series of resolutions:-- 1st. Recommending the issue of one million dollars of city bonds, for the purpose of purchasing arms and munitions of war, and to provide for the successful defence of the city and its approaches. 2d. To appropriate twenty-five thousand dollars for the purpose of uniforming and equipping soldiers mustered into the service of the country. 3d. Pledging the cou
ard. These men, some of whom had been sergeants, were to be officers. This combination being brought to my notice, proper measures were taken to secure the prevention of its designs. The six instigators of it were brought before a military commission and tried for breach of parole, the punishment of which by military law is death. This was a very flagrant case of such breach, because they took advantage of the liberty obtained by parole to plot war against the United States. On the 31st day of May, in pursuance of the advice of the commission as to what disposition should be made of them, an order was issued for their execution by hanging. Now, it was known in New Orleans that no capital execution had been had in the State of Louisiana for eighteen years, the sequence of which was that New Orleans had been the scene of the most unprovoked and unjustifiable murders which could well be imagined, with no punishment therefor. One had taken place on the day of my landing there. A
in the world. That was true, but not in the way it was supposed. The negroes all came and told me anything they thought I wanted to know. I never let it be known that one of them spoke to me upon any subject. I had nobody else hear that class of informers. They would tell me the exact truth, so far as they understood it, and if it was anything of worth, they received from my hands some small compensation. Let me give two examples of the manner in which that system worked. Early in June I was informed that there was a sewing bee in the house of one of the first ladies of New Orleans and that they were making a flag to send to a New Orleans regiment in Beauregard's army at Corinth. This flag was of the finest embroidered silk, trimmed with gold fringe and very handsomely ornamented. After I got the information I waited quietly until the flag was finished and a nice canvas case made for it. This case was also embroidered, as one doesn't want an unfinished flag. Then I sent
entation and upon the representations made to me that it would be regarded as an act of pacification, shortly before the date fixed for the execution of the order, I respited the prisoners to hard labor for a long term. That was done on the 4th day of June. Meanwhile Mumford, who had torn down the flag, had been put on trial for that crime. His offence had been a most heinous one, and the dire results that might have arisen from it seemed almost providentially to have been averted. Aftehe head of the gamblers of New Orleans, and was a man of considerable education, some property, and much influence with the lower class. It was said that Butler would never dare hang him, and when the parole offenders had been respited on the 4th of June, and Special Order No. 10 was issued on the 5th of June commanding that Mumford be executed on the 7th of June between 6 A. M. and 12 M., the order was received by the populace almost with derision. No good man petitioned for his release, b
controversy. Although he had been clearly convicted of this offense against the laws of war and his country, yet it was not believed by the rebels that Mumford would be executed. He was at the head of the gamblers of New Orleans, and was a man of considerable education, some property, and much influence with the lower class. It was said that Butler would never dare hang him, and when the parole offenders had been respited on the 4th of June, and Special Order No. 10 was issued on the 5th of June commanding that Mumford be executed on the 7th of June between 6 A. M. and 12 M., the order was received by the populace almost with derision. No good man petitioned for his release, but the bad men, the blacklegs and blackguards, assembled in large numbers and voted that he should not be executed, and that if he was executed Butler should die the death by any and every possible means. They thought some of selecting a committee to so notify me, but upon consideration it was found that
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