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March 3rd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
d a series of resolutions:-- 1st. Recommending the issue of one million dollars of city bonds, for the purpose of purchasing arms and munitions of war, and to provide for the successful defence of the city and its approaches. 2d. To appropriate twenty-five thousand dollars for the purpose of uniforming and equipping soldiers mustered into the service of the country. 3d. Pledging the council to support the families of all soldiers who shall volunteer for the war. On the 3d of March, 1862, the city council authorized the mayor to issue the bonds of the city for a million dollars; and provided that the chairman of the finance committee might pay over the said bonds to the Committee of Public Safety, appointed by the common council of the city of New Orleans, as per resolution No. 8,930, approved 20th of February, 1862, in such sums as they may require for the purchase of arms and munitions of war, provisions, or to provide any means for the successful defence of the city
May 15th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
rdinances, I had once read an old English ordinance, which I thought, with a few changes, mutatis mutandis, might accomplish the purpose. There was one thing certain about it; it must be an order that would execute itself, otherwise it would stir up more strife in its execution by the police than it would quell. Therefore, after full consideration, I handed to my chief of staff, to be put upon the order books, the following order:-- headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, May 15, 1862. General Order No. 28. As the officers and soldiers of the United States have been subject to repeated insults from the women (calling themselves ladies) of New Orleans, in return for the most scrupulous non-interference and courtesy on our part, it is ordered that hereafter when any female shall, by word, gesture, or movement, insult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States, she shall be regarded and held liable to he treated as a woman of the town plying her
June 12th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
kship in his department, and there she remained as long as she chose to stay in office, so far as I know. I saw the boys from time to time. They called to see me with their mother and they seemed to be very gentlemanly and bright. I had one other occasion, while in New Orleans, to administer capital punishment. I certainly had no desertions reported to me that required it. The circumstances of this case are peculiar enough for narration. For something over a week prior to the 12th of June, 1862, there had been continued complaint made at my headquarters of burglaries and robberies committed in the night time in many houses and in many parts of the city. No clew was brought to me by which the offenders could be ascertained, and it became a very annoying scandal and disgrace. On the morning of the 12th I said at mess table: This system of night thieveries must be put an end to, and I am going to attend to nothing else, routine duty excepted, until it is done. When I got to
August, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
General.--Your kind letter of the 6th instant was received on the 10th. You say that no one more surely than myself knows that the acts for which my government blames you were untruly reported and unjustly construed. What your intentions were when you issued the order which brought so much censure upon yourself I, of course, cannot tell; but I can testify, and do with pleasure, that nearly all of the many persons who passed through my lines, to and from New Orleans, during the months of August and September, 1862, spoke favorably of the treatment they had received from you; and with all my inquiries, which were constant, I did not hear of one single instance of a lady being insulted by your command. I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, M. S. G. It was read by Beauregard to his army at Corinth, to inflame the Southern heart; but the only effect that it had upon him and them, so far as I have any evidence, was that almost imme
September, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
kind letter of the 6th instant was received on the 10th. You say that no one more surely than myself knows that the acts for which my government blames you were untruly reported and unjustly construed. What your intentions were when you issued the order which brought so much censure upon yourself I, of course, cannot tell; but I can testify, and do with pleasure, that nearly all of the many persons who passed through my lines, to and from New Orleans, during the months of August and September, 1862, spoke favorably of the treatment they had received from you; and with all my inquiries, which were constant, I did not hear of one single instance of a lady being insulted by your command. I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, M. S. G. It was read by Beauregard to his army at Corinth, to inflame the Southern heart; but the only effect that it had upon him and them, so far as I have any evidence, was that almost immediately afterwa
September 2nd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
than he-adders, were the insulting enemies of my army and my country, and were so treated. I have given too much space to the necessary contact I had with bad women and their adventures. But I take a little space to show that I was capable, although denominated a beast and outlaw, of dealing with the good, charitable, and religious women in a manner worthy of myself and my government. The following letter will explain itself:-- headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, Sept. 2, 1862. Madame:--I had no information until the reception of your note, that so sad a result to the sisters of your society had happened from the bombardment of Donaldsonville. I am very, very sorry that Rear-Admiral Farragut was unaware that he was injuring your establishment by his shells. Any injury must have been entirely accidental. The destruction of that town became a necessity. The inhabitants harbored a gang of cowardly guerillas, who committed every atrocity; amongst others,
October, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
, it is needless to say, was enforced, and it is also needless to say, was the cause of protests of the foreign consuls in behalf of neutral forsworn rebels. I do not know now that I can put the whole matter of this highly beneficial order, its cause, execution, and results, in better form than that in which I explained it to the Secretary of War officially in answer to those protests, on the application of the Secretary of State:-- headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, October, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Sir:--I have the honor to report the facts and circumstances of my General Order No. 55, in answer to the complaints of the Prussian and French legations, as to the enforcement of that order upon certain inhabitants of New Orleans, claimed to be the subjects of these respective governments. Before discussing the specialty and personal relations of the several complaints, it will be necessary, in a general way, to give an account of the state o
December 9th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
l exactions, fines, and imposts whatever. I have the honor to be your obedient servant, Benjamin F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. The government sustained Order No. 55, and upon that being made known to the commanding general, on December 9, 1862, he issued the following order:-- New Orleans, December 9, 1862. Under General Order No. 55, current series, from these headquarters, an assessment was made upon certain parties who had aided the rebellion, to be appropriated to the December 9, 1862. Under General Order No. 55, current series, from these headquarters, an assessment was made upon certain parties who had aided the rebellion, to be appropriated to the relief of the starving poor of New Orleans. The calls upon the fund raised under that order have been frequent and urgent, and it is now exhausted. But the poor of this city have the same or increased necessities for relief as then, and their calls must be heard; and it is both fit and proper that the parties responsible for the present state of affairs should have the burden of their support. Therefore, the parties named in Schedules A and B, of General Order No. 55, as hereunto annexe
December 15th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
y have the same or increased necessities for relief as then, and their calls must be heard; and it is both fit and proper that the parties responsible for the present state of affairs should have the burden of their support. Therefore, the parties named in Schedules A and B, of General Order No. 55, as hereunto annexed, are assessed in like sums, and for the same purpose, and will make payment to D. C. G. Field, financial clerk, at his office, at these headquarters, on or before Monday, December 15, 1862. I was relieved by General Banks six days after. As the time this assessment was to be paid was at the expiration of seven days, and I was relieved before that time, of course nobody paid the assessment according to the order. Within thirty days General Banks found himself under the necessity of renewing the order and did so. But nobody paid the slightest attention to it and nobody paid anything afterwards on that order, and it stands to-day unrepealed, uncancelled, and unexe
October 12th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 12
o not believe any man of ordinary sense, of clear judgment, ever did misunderstand it or misinterpret how the order intended that such women should be dealt with, or that it was the slightest suggestion that she be dealt with in any other way than being put in the hands of the police. Brig.-Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson, M. S. G., in answer to a letter from me about his kind treat ment of a prisoner, gives this testimony:-- depot of prisoners of War, Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, O., Oct. 12, 1863. General.--Your kind letter of the 6th instant was received on the 10th. You say that no one more surely than myself knows that the acts for which my government blames you were untruly reported and unjustly construed. What your intentions were when you issued the order which brought so much censure upon yourself I, of course, cannot tell; but I can testify, and do with pleasure, that nearly all of the many persons who passed through my lines, to and from New Orleans, during the mo
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