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D. G. Farragut (search for this): chapter 12
the military had fled, the mayor of New Orleans informed Farragut,--I say Farragut, for now it is no honor to him to be givFarragut, for now it is no honor to him to be given a title,--that as the civil authority of the city he could not surrender the United States mint. Farragut then ordered tFarragut then ordered the United States flag to be placed on the government buildings as a token of the surrender of the city, and had it placed ths and would be followed by the threatened bombardment. Farragut did not place a guard on the top of the mint for the reashole fleet, which lay broadside on. On Sunday morning, Farragut called his officers and crew below in religious service tn had run away and that there was no movement of anybody, Farragut paused, and so the city was saved from bombardment. FaFarragut sent his boat ashore to ascertain why the flag had been taken down and was informed that it was done by some person wlag of the United States, and it had been placed there by Farragut after he took possession of the city. Upon that point I
David G. Farragut (search for this): chapter 12
o insurrection. I waited sometime in the hope that this epidemic among the women would die out. But it did not; it increased. At last, on one Saturday, Flag-Officer Farragut had been invited ashore by Colonel Deming, who was in command of the troops in the city, to take dinner with him and his friends, in compliment of FarragutFarragut's great achievements. Colonel Deming went to the levee to meet the flag-officer when he landed, and they walked up arm in arm in full uniform. While going along one of the principal streets, there fell upon them what at first they took to be a sudden and heavy shower; but it proved to be the emptying of a vessel of water upon teption of your note, that so sad a result to the sisters of your society had happened from the bombardment of Donaldsonville. I am very, very sorry that Rear-Admiral Farragut was unaware that he was injuring your establishment by his shells. Any injury must have been entirely accidental. The destruction of that town became a n
D. C. G. Field (search for this): chapter 12
order have been frequent and urgent, and it is now exhausted. But the poor of this city have the same or increased necessities for relief as then, and their calls must be heard; and it is both fit and proper that the parties responsible for the present state of affairs should have the burden of their support. Therefore, the parties named in Schedules A and B, of General Order No. 55, as hereunto annexed, are assessed in like sums, and for the same purpose, and will make payment to D. C. G. Field, financial clerk, at his office, at these headquarters, on or before Monday, December 15, 1862. I was relieved by General Banks six days after. As the time this assessment was to be paid was at the expiration of seven days, and I was relieved before that time, of course nobody paid the assessment according to the order. Within thirty days General Banks found himself under the necessity of renewing the order and did so. But nobody paid the slightest attention to it and nobody paid a
made by the State and Confederate authorities for the defence of the city. Nearly the entire foreign population of the city enrolled itself in companies, battalions, and brigades, representing different nationalities. They were armed, uniformed, and equipped, drilled and manoeuvred, and reported for service to the Confederate generals. Many of the foreign officers took the oath of allegiance to the Confederate States. The brigadier-general in command of the European Brigade, Paul Juge, Fils, a naturalized citizen of the United States, but born in France, renounced his citizenship, and applied to the French government to be restored to his former citizenship as a native of France, at the very time he held the command of this foreign legion. The Prussian consul, now General Reichard, of the Confederate army, of whom we shall have more to say in the course of this report, raised a battalion of his countrymen, and went to Virginia, where he has been promoted for his gallantry, in
own name and that had better not be connected with mine so as to draw observation. Very well, he said, her place will be a nine hundred dollar position. Send her with your card and she shall have it, and if she deserves it she shall hold it. She rented her house in Wytheville and took a small house in Washington. I saw her once in about six months or a year after that. She turned out to be a very good clerk, and was not disturbed until the coming in of the reform administration of Mr. Hayes. Then there was a search made for places to put in the reformer's nieces, and the records were examined to see who were behind clerks as to influence. The list showed nobody behind Mrs. Mumford, and, the commissioner having been changed, of course she was reformed out. She informed me. I visited the Treasury Department, the Department of the Interior, and the Agricultural Department to see if she could not be restored to a place. I found it utterly impossible until I visited a rebel
J. William Henry (search for this): chapter 12
fficer had four men with him, and they searched everything in the house, evidently looking more carefully after pistols than guns. When they went away they gave the owner a certificate of search. This certificate read as follows:-- J. William Henry, first lieutenant of the Eighteenth Massachusetts Volunteers, has searched the premises No. 93 Toulouse Street, and find to the best of my judgment that all the people who live there are loyal. Please examine no more. J. William Henry, LieJ. William Henry, Lieut. Eighteenth Mass. Vols. The complainant said they took all the jewelry in the house and somewhere in the neighborhood of $10,000 in money, but how much there was of either he could not tell. Looking at the certificate I saw at once that it was a forgery, because I had no Eighteenth Massachusetts regiment. I looked at the complainant in some despair, and said:-- Did you notice anything that you can tell me by which I can trace the men? They went away in a cab. In the name of
ed for his principal a note, secured by mortgage, in anticipation of its being due, in order to purchase twenty-five thousand dollars of this loan. Without, however, descending into particulars, is the profitableness of the investment to be permitted to be alleged as a sufficient apology for aiding the rebellion by money and arms? If so, all their army contractors, principally Jews, should be held blameless, for they have made immense fortunes by the war. Indeed, I suppose another Jew--one Judas — thought his investment in the thirty pieces of silver was a profitable one, until the penalty of treachery reached him. When I took possession of New Orleans, I found the city nearly on the verge of starvation, but thirty days provision in it, and the poor utterly without the means of procuring what food there was to be had. I endeavored to aid the city government in the work of feeding the poor; but I soon found that the very distribution of food was a means faithlessly used to enco
rts were made by the State and Confederate authorities for the defence of the city. Nearly the entire foreign population of the city enrolled itself in companies, battalions, and brigades, representing different nationalities. They were armed, uniformed, and equipped, drilled and manoeuvred, and reported for service to the Confederate generals. Many of the foreign officers took the oath of allegiance to the Confederate States. The brigadier-general in command of the European Brigade, Paul Juge, Fils, a naturalized citizen of the United States, but born in France, renounced his citizenship, and applied to the French government to be restored to his former citizenship as a native of France, at the very time he held the command of this foreign legion. The Prussian consul, now General Reichard, of the Confederate army, of whom we shall have more to say in the course of this report, raised a battalion of his countrymen, and went to Virginia, where he has been promoted for his gall
e was a search made for places to put in the reformer's nieces, and the records were examined to see who were behind clerks as to influence. The list showed nobody behind Mrs. Mumford, and, the commissioner having been changed, of course she was reformed out. She informed me. I visited the Treasury Department, the Department of the Interior, and the Agricultural Department to see if she could not be restored to a place. I found it utterly impossible until I visited a rebel brigadier, General Key, then Postmaster-General, and told him the story. He gave her a clerkship in his department, and there she remained as long as she chose to stay in office, so far as I know. I saw the boys from time to time. They called to see me with their mother and they seemed to be very gentlemanly and bright. I had one other occasion, while in New Orleans, to administer capital punishment. I certainly had no desertions reported to me that required it. The circumstances of this case are peculia
I will send to you, for this is a very beautiful one. You can go, madam. May I ask you a question, General? she gasped out. Oh, certainly; I will answer it if a proper one. Which of those girls gave information about this flag? Oh, I can't tell you that, madam, because they would not come and tell me anything more if I did. I know, I know, said she; one of them has been seen walking with a Yankee officer. I have no objection to you secession women eating each other like Kilkenny cats; I have nothing to do with that. But you may accuse her unjustly. It may be your servants, which I suppose you have. No, it was not my servants, General; that won't do. The only one of my family that knows anything about it is my foster sister, the daughter of my nurse brought up with me from the same breast. Oh, well, I am glad to hear you have such faithful servants, and she left. It was her foster sister all the same who was my informer, and she did it without hope of rewar
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