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Kruttschnidt (search for this): chapter 12
ised a battalion of his countrymen, and went to Virginia, where he has been promoted for his gallantry, in the rebel service, leaving his commercial partner, Mr. Kruttschnidt, now acting Prussian consul, who has married the sister of the rebel secretary of war, to embarrass as much as possible the United States officers here, by sage ties. But it is said that this subscription is made to the fund for the sake of the investment. It will appear, however, by a careful examination, that Mr. Kruttschnidt collected for his principal a note, secured by mortgage, in anticipation of its being due, in order to purchase twenty-five thousand dollars of this loan. Wfederate States. I find also the house of Reichard & Co., the senior partner of which, General Reichard, is in the rebel army. I find the junior partner, Mr. Kruttschnidt, the brother-in-law of Benjamin, the rebel secretary of war, using all the funds in his hands to purchase arms, and collecting the securities of his correspo
they are due, to get funds to loan to the rebel authorities, and now acting Prussian consul here, doing quite as effective service to the rebels as his partner in the field. I find Mme. Vogel, late partner in the same house of Reichard & Co., now absent, whose funds are managed by that house. I find M. Paesher & Co., bankers, whose clerks and employees formed a part of the French legion, organized to fight the United States, and who contributed largely to arm and equip that corps. And a Mr. Lewis, whose antecedents I have not had time to investigate. And these are fair specimens of the neutrality of the foreigners, for whom the government is called upon to interfere, to prevent their paying anything toward the relief fund for their starving countrymen. If the representatives of the foreign governments will feed their own starving people, over whom the only protection they extend, so far as I see, is to tax them all, poor and rich, a dollar and a half each for certificates of
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 12
for many weeks, but the order was never revoked, but, on the contrary, the government gave my administration its highest sanction. The President did not confer on me, however, the Order of the Garter. On account of that order a reward of ten thousand dollars was offered for my head; and a gentle, soft-hearted little Southern lady published that she wanted to subscribe her mite to make the reward sixty thousand dollars, so that my head would be sure to be taken. My critic, in writing Lincoln, a history, deems that the order was well enough itself, but indefensible as a matter of taste. Indeed, I had hoped that I had distinguished myself in one thing, if no more, and that is that I did not carry on war with rose-water,--a pleasant thing to do, but I did not do it. That is enough to say, as he and myself differ upon another question of taste, to which I have already adverted. These women, she-adders, more venomous than he-adders, were the insulting enemies of my army and my cou
tes officers here, by subscriptions to city defence fund, and groundless complaints to the Prussian minister. I have thus endeavored to give a faithful and exact account of the state of the foreign population of New Orleans, on the 15th day of February, 1862. In October, 1861, the city had voted to erect a battery out of this defence fund. On the 19th of February, 1862, the city council, by vote published and commented upon in the newspapers, placed in the hands of the Confederate General Lovell, fifty thousand dollars, to be expended by him in the defences of the city. It will, therefore, clearly appear that all the inhabitants of the city knew that the city council was raising and expending large sums for war purposes. On the 20th of the same February, the city council raised an extraordinary Committee of public safety, from the body of the inhabitants at large, consisting of sixty members, for the purpose of co-operating with the Confederate and State authorities in dev
William N. Mercer (search for this): chapter 12
m their pockets when not in their hands. They kept declaring to each other that Mumford was not to be hanged, and that this was only a scare on the part of old Butler, and The mint at New Orleans. threatened what the people would do if he was hanged. The street was quite full of them, almost to my office. At the last of it they got quite uneasy, the eyes of Mumford being lifted up the street to see if some staff officer did not come riding down, bearing the order of reprieve. Dr. William N. Mercer was one of the best gentlemen in the city. Although a secessionist, he was a very mild one, holding the doctrine that the Southern States had no right to secede, but that we had no right to force them not to. He was eighty years old, president of the Bank of Louisiana, and a man with whom I had formed the most friendly relations. A little before ten o'clock he almost rushed into my office, where I was sitting alone with my stenographer, and, reaching out his hands, tears running do
Thomas O. Moore (search for this): chapter 12
as I have before had the honor to inform the Department of State, it was made a condition of the very passes given by Governor Moore, that a quantity of arms and powder should be returned in proportion to the cotton shipped. The very high price ofllowed by the planters and factors of the other States of the Confederacy, the same cotton factors made a petition to Governor Moore and General Twiggs to devise means to prevent any shipment of cotton to New Orleans whatever. For answer to this petition, Governor Moore issued a proclamation forbidding the bringing of cotton within the limits of the city, under the penalties therein prescribed. This action was concurred in by General Twiggs, then in command of the Confederate forces, and e rebellion. The only cotton allowed to be shipped during the autumn and winter of 1861 and 1862, was by permits of Governor Moore, granted upon the express condition, that at least one-half in value should be returned in arms and munitions of war.
William B. Mumford (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 10: the woman order, Mumford's execution, etc. Conduct of women of New Orleans was done on the 4th day of June. Meanwhile Mumford, who had torn down the flag, had been put on more attention that night to the question of Mumford's execution than I did to sleep, but I came ton of the next day I got a note saying that Mrs. Mumford and her children wished me to see them. I I was not disturbed until I called for him. Mrs. Mumford in a proper way began to intercede for her The place was almost in sight of my office. Mumford was permitted to stand upon the scaffold and last of it they got quite uneasy, the eyes of Mumford being lifted up the street to see if some staand Dixon's line, including Jefferson Davis. Mumford's wife and family were declared to be the sacer terms that she was somehow interested in Mrs. Mumford, who was then in the greatest distress. Mro influence. The list showed nobody behind Mrs. Mumford, and, the commissioner having been changed,[16 more...]
M. Paesher (search for this): chapter 12
er, Mr. Kruttschnidt, the brother-in-law of Benjamin, the rebel secretary of war, using all the funds in his hands to purchase arms, and collecting the securities of his correspondents before they are due, to get funds to loan to the rebel authorities, and now acting Prussian consul here, doing quite as effective service to the rebels as his partner in the field. I find Mme. Vogel, late partner in the same house of Reichard & Co., now absent, whose funds are managed by that house. I find M. Paesher & Co., bankers, whose clerks and employees formed a part of the French legion, organized to fight the United States, and who contributed largely to arm and equip that corps. And a Mr. Lewis, whose antecedents I have not had time to investigate. And these are fair specimens of the neutrality of the foreigners, for whom the government is called upon to interfere, to prevent their paying anything toward the relief fund for their starving countrymen. If the representatives of the foreig
Palmerston (search for this): chapter 12
espondence, Series I., Vol. XV., p. 501. It was post hoc if not propter hoc. He was taken sick, resigned his command, and went to Bladon Springs to recover. Palmerston, however, got up in Parliament and denounced the order as unfit to be written in the English language. The only possible objectionable phrase in it was part of an ordinance of the city of London, from which I adapted it. Palmerston's indignation even went so far, and the women-beaters and wife-whippers of England were so shocked, that they called upon their government to represent their condemnation of the order to our State Department. When their minister here brought it to the attent him and me would have been that I should probably have added,--especially when a king was establishing the Order of the Garter as an emblem of good conduct. Palmerston said my government would revoke the order when it heard it. It did not hear of anything else for many weeks, but the order was never revoked, but, on the contra
e, at the very time he held the command of this foreign legion. The Prussian consul, now General Reichard, of the Confederate army, of whom we shall have more to say in the course of this report, rmed for a bargain, who had married the sister of the rebel secretary of war, the partner of General Reichard, late Prussian consul, then in command in the Confederate army, who subscribed for himself,f allegiance to support the constitution of the Confederate States. I find also the house of Reichard & Co., the senior partner of which, General Reichard, is in the rebel army. I find the junior General Reichard, is in the rebel army. I find the junior partner, Mr. Kruttschnidt, the brother-in-law of Benjamin, the rebel secretary of war, using all the funds in his hands to purchase arms, and collecting the securities of his correspondents before theo the rebels as his partner in the field. I find Mme. Vogel, late partner in the same house of Reichard & Co., now absent, whose funds are managed by that house. I find M. Paesher & Co., bankers, wh
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