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onfederates, never hear for what purpose the city was raising a million and a quarter in bonds? Take the Prussian consul, who complains for himself and the Mrs. Vogel whom he represents, as an example. Did he know about this fund? He, a trader, a Jew, famed for a bargain, who had married the sister of the rebel secretary of war, the partner of General Reichard, late Prussian consul, then in command in the Confederate army, who subscribed for himself, his partner and Mrs. Vogel, the wife of his former partner, thirty thousand dollars--did he not know what he was doing, when he bought these bonds of this Committee of public safety ? On the contrary, ifunds to loan to the rebel authorities, and now acting Prussian consul here, doing quite as effective service to the rebels as his partner in the field. I find Mme. Vogel, late partner in the same house of Reichard & Co., now absent, whose funds are managed by that house. I find M. Paesher & Co., bankers, whose clerks and employ
order them to be paid into the Confederate treasury for the purpose of carrying on the war. Mrs. Slocomb was a leader in the best society of New Orleans. She had undertaken to close out the business of her deceased husband. She was a very full and fervent believer in the right and justice of secession. She equipped from her private purse the crack artillery company of New Orleans, the Washington Artillery, and sent it to the war, one of her sons being an officer, and a son-in-law, Captain Urquhart, also holding a commission in that organization. She had subscribed very liberally in aid of the rebellion, and she was upon my information very much looked up to by those engaged in carrying it on. Before the city was taken, a summons was served upon Mrs. Slocomb by a rebel court to show cause why she should not pay into the treasury of the Confederacy the amount of the debt due the Northern creditors of her deceased husband. She answered the summons in person, and declared that h
that my necessities, which caused the request for permission to use your house during your absence this summer, have been relieved. I have taken the house of General Twiggs, late of the United States army, for quarters. Inclined never on slight causes to use the power intrusted to me to grieve even sentiments only entitled to reptly and cheerfully followed by the planters and factors of the other States of the Confederacy, the same cotton factors made a petition to Governor Moore and General Twiggs to devise means to prevent any shipment of cotton to New Orleans whatever. For answer to this petition, Governor Moore issued a proclamation forbidding the bringing of cotton within the limits of the city, under the penalties therein prescribed. This action was concurred in by General Twiggs, then in command of the Confederate forces, and enforced by newspaper articles, published in the leading journals. This was one of the series of offensive measures which were undertaken by
M. Jefferson Thompson (search for this): chapter 12
gment, ever did misunderstand it or misinterpret how the order intended that such women should be dealt with, or that it was the slightest suggestion that she be dealt with in any other way than being put in the hands of the police. Brig.-Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson, M. S. G., in answer to a letter from me about his kind treat ment of a prisoner, gives this testimony:-- depot of prisoners of War, Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, O., Oct. 12, 1863. General.--Your kind letter of the 6th inst spoke favorably of the treatment they had received from you; and with all my inquiries, which were constant, I did not hear of one single instance of a lady being insulted by your command. I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, M. S. G. It was read by Beauregard to his army at Corinth, to inflame the Southern heart; but the only effect that it had upon him and them, so far as I have any evidence, was that almost immediately afterwards, on J
Buras (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
But with that I have nothing to do. It may be remembered that I recognized a man parading in the mob in front of the St. Charles Hotel, wearing in his buttonhole a fragment of the national flag, which had been torn down from the mint, and that I ordered measures to be taken for his identification. Soon afterward he was arrested, but before he could be brought to trial there was another cause for a military commission. Six soldiers who were captured and paroled at Forts Jackson and St. Philip were confederating together to enlist a company to be known as the Monroe guard, Monroe being mayor of the city. This company, when fully organized, was to arm itself in the city and break through our lines and join Beauregard. These men, some of whom had been sergeants, were to be officers. This combination being brought to my notice, proper measures were taken to secure the prevention of its designs. The six instigators of it were brought before a military commission and tried for br
Sandusky, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
equired it. I do not believe any man of ordinary sense, of clear judgment, ever did misunderstand it or misinterpret how the order intended that such women should be dealt with, or that it was the slightest suggestion that she be dealt with in any other way than being put in the hands of the police. Brig.-Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson, M. S. G., in answer to a letter from me about his kind treat ment of a prisoner, gives this testimony:-- depot of prisoners of War, Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, O., Oct. 12, 1863. General.--Your kind letter of the 6th instant was received on the 10th. You say that no one more surely than myself knows that the acts for which my government blames you were untruly reported and unjustly construed. What your intentions were when you issued the order which brought so much censure upon yourself I, of course, cannot tell; but I can testify, and do with pleasure, that nearly all of the many persons who passed through my lines, to and from New Orleans,
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
authorized the mayor to issue the bonds of the city for a million dollars; and provided that the chairman of the finance committee might pay over the said bonds to the Committee of Public Safety, appointed by the common council of the city of New Orleans, as per resolution No. 8,930, approved 20th of February, 1862, in such sums as they may require for the purchase of arms and munitions of war, provisions, or to provide any means for the successful defence of the city and its approaches. Ane honor to be your obedient servant, Benjamin F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. The government sustained Order No. 55, and upon that being made known to the commanding general, on December 9, 1862, he issued the following order:-- New Orleans, December 9, 1862. Under General Order No. 55, current series, from these headquarters, an assessment was made upon certain parties who had aided the rebellion, to be appropriated to the relief of the starving poor of New Orleans. The ca
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
conciliation, complied with every reasonable desire; and yet we cannot walk the streets without being outraged and spit upon by green girls. I do not fear the troops, but if aggression must be, let it not be all against us. My troops were New England soldiers, and consequently men well bred in every courtesy toward women, for a well behaved woman can safely travel alone all through New England. I did not fear that any one of them would conduct himself in such a way that he could not look New England. I did not fear that any one of them would conduct himself in such a way that he could not look me in the face and tell me of it if I asked him. I was not afraid on that score. I was only afraid the order would not be understood by the women. There was no case of aggression after that order was issued, no case of insult by word or look against our officers or soldiers while in New Orleans. The order executed itself. No arrests were ever made under it or because of it. All the ladies in New Orleans forebore to insult our troops because they didn't want to be deemed common women,
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
n of New Orleans trouble with neutrals and whipper-snapper consuls Assessing wealthy Confederates to support the poor Mumford tears down the stars and Stripes is arrested and sentenced to death Butler threatened with assassination the wife's appeal Mumford hanged eight years later Depredation harshly punished Butler's wonderful spy system a spy in every family negro servants tell all some amusing instances I want that Confederate flag, Madam, for a Fourth of July celebration in Lowell It must not be inferred that the several matters of which I treat at so much length followed one another in point of time. They were all going on at once, each pressing upon the other and each interfering with doing the other, and requiring the utmost industrious diligence. Crowding in upon us from the first moment of our occupation came a matter which at first seemed would be an annoyance only, but which speedily grew into an affair of most serious consequence, and one causing much dis
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ionist, but I had heard that his wife was exceedingly interested on the side of the rebels, and had been ordered out of Washington by the Secretary of War for some treasonable acts. I said to him:-- I want to say to you that one of my officers haverted to that use. There was no appropriation upon which a requisition could be properly answered by the government at Washington from which to take it out of the taxes of the North. But nothing was further from my thoughts than either of these expsend to me to ascertain if I would see her. I immediately answered I would see Mrs. Mumford any time at my office in Washington. A few days later her card came to me and she was shown in. She had aged somewhat. I told her that I had received a lhall have it, and if she deserves it she shall hold it. She rented her house in Wytheville and took a small house in Washington. I saw her once in about six months or a year after that. She turned out to be a very good clerk, and was not disturb
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