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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
conciliation, complied with every reasonable desire; and yet we cannot walk the streets without being outraged and spit upon by green girls. I do not fear the troops, but if aggression must be, let it not be all against us. My troops were New England soldiers, and consequently men well bred in every courtesy toward women, for a well behaved woman can safely travel alone all through New England. I did not fear that any one of them would conduct himself in such a way that he could not look New England. I did not fear that any one of them would conduct himself in such a way that he could not look me in the face and tell me of it if I asked him. I was not afraid on that score. I was only afraid the order would not be understood by the women. There was no case of aggression after that order was issued, no case of insult by word or look against our officers or soldiers while in New Orleans. The order executed itself. No arrests were ever made under it or because of it. All the ladies in New Orleans forebore to insult our troops because they didn't want to be deemed common women,
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
me other source. But with that I have nothing to do. It may be remembered that I recognized a man parading in the mob in front of the St. Charles Hotel, wearing in his buttonhole a fragment of the national flag, which had been torn down from the mint, and that I ordered measures to be taken for his identification. Soon afterward he was arrested, but before he could be brought to trial there was another cause for a military commission. Six soldiers who were captured and paroled at Forts Jackson and St. Philip were confederating together to enlist a company to be known as the Monroe guard, Monroe being mayor of the city. This company, when fully organized, was to arm itself in the city and break through our lines and join Beauregard. These men, some of whom had been sergeants, were to be officers. This combination being brought to my notice, proper measures were taken to secure the prevention of its designs. The six instigators of it were brought before a military commission
I will send to you, for this is a very beautiful one. You can go, madam. May I ask you a question, General? she gasped out. Oh, certainly; I will answer it if a proper one. Which of those girls gave information about this flag? Oh, I can't tell you that, madam, because they would not come and tell me anything more if I did. I know, I know, said she; one of them has been seen walking with a Yankee officer. I have no objection to you secession women eating each other like Kilkenny cats; I have nothing to do with that. But you may accuse her unjustly. It may be your servants, which I suppose you have. No, it was not my servants, General; that won't do. The only one of my family that knows anything about it is my foster sister, the daughter of my nurse brought up with me from the same breast. Oh, well, I am glad to hear you have such faithful servants, and she left. It was her foster sister all the same who was my informer, and she did it without hope of rewar
Thomas O. Moore (search for this): chapter 12
as I have before had the honor to inform the Department of State, it was made a condition of the very passes given by Governor Moore, that a quantity of arms and powder should be returned in proportion to the cotton shipped. The very high price ofllowed by the planters and factors of the other States of the Confederacy, the same cotton factors made a petition to Governor Moore and General Twiggs to devise means to prevent any shipment of cotton to New Orleans whatever. For answer to this petition, Governor Moore issued a proclamation forbidding the bringing of cotton within the limits of the city, under the penalties therein prescribed. This action was concurred in by General Twiggs, then in command of the Confederate forces, and e rebellion. The only cotton allowed to be shipped during the autumn and winter of 1861 and 1862, was by permits of Governor Moore, granted upon the express condition, that at least one-half in value should be returned in arms and munitions of war.
e was a search made for places to put in the reformer's nieces, and the records were examined to see who were behind clerks as to influence. The list showed nobody behind Mrs. Mumford, and, the commissioner having been changed, of course she was reformed out. She informed me. I visited the Treasury Department, the Department of the Interior, and the Agricultural Department to see if she could not be restored to a place. I found it utterly impossible until I visited a rebel brigadier, General Key, then Postmaster-General, and told him the story. He gave her a clerkship in his department, and there she remained as long as she chose to stay in office, so far as I know. I saw the boys from time to time. They called to see me with their mother and they seemed to be very gentlemanly and bright. I had one other occasion, while in New Orleans, to administer capital punishment. I certainly had no desertions reported to me that required it. The circumstances of this case are peculia
ame fund. Will it be pretended for a moment that these persons — bankers, merchants, brokers, who are making this complaint,--did not know what this fund was, and its purposes, to which they were subscribing by thousands of dollars? Did Mr. Rochereau, for instance, who had taken an oath to support the Confederate States, a banker, and then a colonel commanding a body of troops in the service of the Confederates, never hear for what purpose the city was raising a million and a quarter in b, if the bellies of the foreigners were as actively with the rebels, as are the heads of those who claim exemption, thus far, from this taxation, made and used for purposes above set forth, upon the ground of their neutrality; among whom I find Rochereau & Co., the senior partner of which firm took an oath of allegiance to support the constitution of the Confederate States. I find also the house of Reichard & Co., the senior partner of which, General Reichard, is in the rebel army. I find t
e, at the very time he held the command of this foreign legion. The Prussian consul, now General Reichard, of the Confederate army, of whom we shall have more to say in the course of this report, rmed for a bargain, who had married the sister of the rebel secretary of war, the partner of General Reichard, late Prussian consul, then in command in the Confederate army, who subscribed for himself,f allegiance to support the constitution of the Confederate States. I find also the house of Reichard & Co., the senior partner of which, General Reichard, is in the rebel army. I find the junior General Reichard, is in the rebel army. I find the junior partner, Mr. Kruttschnidt, the brother-in-law of Benjamin, the rebel secretary of war, using all the funds in his hands to purchase arms, and collecting the securities of his correspondents before theo the rebels as his partner in the field. I find Mme. Vogel, late partner in the same house of Reichard & Co., now absent, whose funds are managed by that house. I find M. Paesher & Co., bankers, wh
own name and that had better not be connected with mine so as to draw observation. Very well, he said, her place will be a nine hundred dollar position. Send her with your card and she shall have it, and if she deserves it she shall hold it. She rented her house in Wytheville and took a small house in Washington. I saw her once in about six months or a year after that. She turned out to be a very good clerk, and was not disturbed until the coming in of the reform administration of Mr. Hayes. Then there was a search made for places to put in the reformer's nieces, and the records were examined to see who were behind clerks as to influence. The list showed nobody behind Mrs. Mumford, and, the commissioner having been changed, of course she was reformed out. She informed me. I visited the Treasury Department, the Department of the Interior, and the Agricultural Department to see if she could not be restored to a place. I found it utterly impossible until I visited a rebel
Henry Deming (search for this): chapter 12
rmoil at least, and possibly ripen into insurrection. I waited sometime in the hope that this epidemic among the women would die out. But it did not; it increased. At last, on one Saturday, Flag-Officer Farragut had been invited ashore by Colonel Deming, who was in command of the troops in the city, to take dinner with him and his friends, in compliment of Farragut's great achievements. Colonel Deming went to the levee to meet the flag-officer when he landed, and they walked up arm in arm iColonel Deming went to the levee to meet the flag-officer when he landed, and they walked up arm in arm in full uniform. While going along one of the principal streets, there fell upon them what at first they took to be a sudden and heavy shower; but it proved to be the emptying of a vessel of water upon them from the balcony above, and not very clean water at that. Of course the vessel was proof that this was done by one of the ladies of New Orleans. A city could hardly be said to be under good government where such things were permitted or attempted by any class of its inhabitants. On the
M. Jefferson Thompson (search for this): chapter 12
gment, ever did misunderstand it or misinterpret how the order intended that such women should be dealt with, or that it was the slightest suggestion that she be dealt with in any other way than being put in the hands of the police. Brig.-Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson, M. S. G., in answer to a letter from me about his kind treat ment of a prisoner, gives this testimony:-- depot of prisoners of War, Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, O., Oct. 12, 1863. General.--Your kind letter of the 6th inst spoke favorably of the treatment they had received from you; and with all my inquiries, which were constant, I did not hear of one single instance of a lady being insulted by your command. I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, M. S. G. It was read by Beauregard to his army at Corinth, to inflame the Southern heart; but the only effect that it had upon him and them, so far as I have any evidence, was that almost immediately afterwards, on J
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