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Dixon, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
as it did there was a universal hush. The bottles and pistols went out of sight, and the crowd separated as quietly as if it were from the funeral of the most distinguished citizen. And no scene approaching general disorder was ever afterwards witnessed during my time. The fate of Mumford caused the greatest excitement throughout the whole Confederacy. Threats of retaliatory vengeance came from the governor of Louisiana, and were circulated by all the cognate rascals south of Mason and Dixon's line, including Jefferson Davis. Mumford's wife and family were declared to be the sacred trust of the people, and his children the wards of the Confederacy. Subscription papers were immediately called for, and very considerable sums were raised to support them thereafter in comfort. The reader may be interested to know how well this was carried out. I heard and thought nothing more upon the subject, except as a passing reflection, until about the year 1869, the date not recollected,
Wytheville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
to much. At last it was entrusted to some man, a clergyman I think, who concluded to take it and build a house in Wytheville, Virginia, for her and her children, of whom there were three or four. He had purchased two acres of land and had a house b friend, waiting to see me. Can you wait there without difficulty until I can send down and see about this matter at Wytheville? She said she would thankfully, and that I would find her story correct. I immediately sent to Col. Thomas Tabb, . You cannot raise enough to live on very soon; have you no other resource? I have not. Is there any school in Wytheville in which to educate your boys? No, sir. You think they ought to be educated, don't you? Yes, sir. You have n. Send her with your card and she shall have it, and if she deserves it she shall hold it. She rented her house in Wytheville and took a small house in Washington. I saw her once in about six months or a year after that. She turned out to be a
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
lien upon the building of something more than eighty dollars, and the land and buildings were now to be sold to satisfy that lien. Where are you living now? I asked. She said she had come to Alexandria and was staying there with a friend, waiting to see me. Can you wait there without difficulty until I can send down and see about this matter at Wytheville? She said she would thankfully, and that I would find her story correct. I immediately sent to Col. Thomas Tabb, of Hampton, Virginia, who had been a Confederate officer, and who had afterwards been my counsel in some matters of moment. I wrote him the story and asked him to investigate it and to purchase the title to that house in the name of Mrs. Mumford, and charge the amount to me, and telegraph me if it was all right. He telegraphed me within a day or two that the matter was as I had supposed, and he would attend to it. The morning I got that despatch, Mrs. Mumford came again to my office. I told her what had
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
. On the contrary, she bought a quantity of cotton, which, if sold at the price paid for it, would more than have cancelled the debt and freight, and put it on board the schooner John Gilpin, and tried to send it North consigned to the creditors of her husband's estate. The Gilpin, however, was stayed by the Confederate authorities until after we took possession of New Orleans. Mrs. Slocomb and her daughter called upon me for a safe conduct to allow them to go to their country house in North Carolina, stating that they could not take the oath of allegiance to the United States; that at first they had desired the preservation of the Union; that all their male friends and connections were in the Confederate army, and one of them had lost a son and the other a brother in that service; and that they were now unalterably devoted to the cause which they deemed just. I said to them that if they would consent that their house should go into the service of the United States, and be occupie
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
authorized the mayor to issue the bonds of the city for a million dollars; and provided that the chairman of the finance committee might pay over the said bonds to the Committee of Public Safety, appointed by the common council of the city of New Orleans, as per resolution No. 8,930, approved 20th of February, 1862, in such sums as they may require for the purchase of arms and munitions of war, provisions, or to provide any means for the successful defence of the city and its approaches. Ane honor to be your obedient servant, Benjamin F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. The government sustained Order No. 55, and upon that being made known to the commanding general, on December 9, 1862, he issued the following order:-- New Orleans, December 9, 1862. Under General Order No. 55, current series, from these headquarters, an assessment was made upon certain parties who had aided the rebellion, to be appropriated to the relief of the starving poor of New Orleans. The ca
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
the city upon their mission to Europe, to obtain the intervention of foreign powers, great hopes were entertained by the rebels, that the European governments would be induced to interfere from want of a supply of cotton. This supply was being had, to a degree, through the agency of the small vessels shooting out by the numerous bayous, lagoons, and creeks, with which the southern part of Louisiana is penetrated. They eluded the blockade, and conveyed very considerable amounts of cotton to Havana and other foreign ports, where arms and munitions of war were largely imported through the same channels in exchange. Indeed, as I have before had the honor to inform the Department of State, it was made a condition of the very passes given by Governor Moore, that a quantity of arms and powder should be returned in proportion to the cotton shipped. The very high price of the outward as well as the inward cargoes, made these ventures profitable, although but one in three got through with
Franklin (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
he Committee of Public Safety, appointed by the common council of the city of New Orleans, as per resolution No. 8,930, approved 20th of February, 1862, in such sums as they may require for the purchase of arms and munitions of war, provisions, or to provide any means for the successful defence of the city and its approaches. And, at the same time, authorized the chairman of the finance committee to pay over $25,000 to troops mustered into the State service, who should go to the fight at Columbus or elsewhere, under General Beauregard. It was to this fund, in the hands of this extraordinary committee, so published with its objects and purposes, that the complainants subscribed their money, and now claim exemption upon the ground of neutrality, and want of knowledge of the purposes of the fund. It will be remembered that all the steps of the raising of the committee to dispose of this fund were published, and were matters of great public notoriety. The fact that the bonds were
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ding in the mob in front of the St. Charles Hotel, wearing in his buttonhole a fragment of the national flag, which had been torn down from the mint, and that I ordered measures to be taken for his identification. Soon afterward he was arrested, but before he could be brought to trial there was another cause for a military commission. Six soldiers who were captured and paroled at Forts Jackson and St. Philip were confederating together to enlist a company to be known as the Monroe guard, Monroe being mayor of the city. This company, when fully organized, was to arm itself in the city and break through our lines and join Beauregard. These men, some of whom had been sergeants, were to be officers. This combination being brought to my notice, proper measures were taken to secure the prevention of its designs. The six instigators of it were brought before a military commission and tried for breach of parole, the punishment of which by military law is death. This was a very flagran
Carrollton, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
to the lowest, went where he pleased without insult or hostile act by any man in New Orleans. Insomuch was this true that for myself, I walked or rode by day or by night through the streets of New Orleans anywhere I chose between Chalmette and Carrollton without any attendant or guard, or pretence of one, save a single orderly in attendance. But not so with the women of New Orleans. On the evening of the third day after our occupation of the city, the colonel of the Thirty-First MassachusetThere were no incendiary fires there, and, what was more wonderful, there was no assault with attempt to kill. The only crimes tried by the provost court were petty larcenies and assaults, and the city from Chalmette, its southern boundary, to Carrollton, its northern limit, was more safe by night or by day than any city in the United States at the present hour. After my return to the North, the case of the mate's wife was stated to me as one of destitution, and I directed that a sewing mach
Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
bring to me every live thing in it including the cat, and don't let one speak to the other until after they have seen me. In the course of three quarters of an hour the officer reported that he had the prisoners I had sent for. Bring them in in single file, and march them around this room. As they were being marched before me, the face of one of them caught my eye and I knew I had seen it before. I rarely forget a face. Halloa, my man, I said, where have I seen you before? In Boston, General. Whereabouts? In court. Which one of your crimes were you being tried for there? Burglary, General. Well, you were tried for burglary there and convicted? Yes. And pardoned out of State Prison to enlist in the army, and you did so? Yes. What regiment? The Thirtieth. Are you of that regiment now? No; I have been discharged on account of a rupture. Very well; having been convicted of burglary and pardoned once and now caught here robbing houses
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