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William N. Mercer (search for this): chapter 12
m their pockets when not in their hands. They kept declaring to each other that Mumford was not to be hanged, and that this was only a scare on the part of old Butler, and The mint at New Orleans. threatened what the people would do if he was hanged. The street was quite full of them, almost to my office. At the last of it they got quite uneasy, the eyes of Mumford being lifted up the street to see if some staff officer did not come riding down, bearing the order of reprieve. Dr. William N. Mercer was one of the best gentlemen in the city. Although a secessionist, he was a very mild one, holding the doctrine that the Southern States had no right to secede, but that we had no right to force them not to. He was eighty years old, president of the Bank of Louisiana, and a man with whom I had formed the most friendly relations. A little before ten o'clock he almost rushed into my office, where I was sitting alone with my stenographer, and, reaching out his hands, tears running do
William B. Mumford (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 10: the woman order, Mumford's execution, etc. Conduct of women of New Orleans was done on the 4th day of June. Meanwhile Mumford, who had torn down the flag, had been put on more attention that night to the question of Mumford's execution than I did to sleep, but I came ton of the next day I got a note saying that Mrs. Mumford and her children wished me to see them. I I was not disturbed until I called for him. Mrs. Mumford in a proper way began to intercede for her The place was almost in sight of my office. Mumford was permitted to stand upon the scaffold and last of it they got quite uneasy, the eyes of Mumford being lifted up the street to see if some staand Dixon's line, including Jefferson Davis. Mumford's wife and family were declared to be the sacer terms that she was somehow interested in Mrs. Mumford, who was then in the greatest distress. Mro influence. The list showed nobody behind Mrs. Mumford, and, the commissioner having been changed,[16 more...]
D. G. Farragut (search for this): chapter 12
the military had fled, the mayor of New Orleans informed Farragut,--I say Farragut, for now it is no honor to him to be givFarragut, for now it is no honor to him to be given a title,--that as the civil authority of the city he could not surrender the United States mint. Farragut then ordered tFarragut then ordered the United States flag to be placed on the government buildings as a token of the surrender of the city, and had it placed ths and would be followed by the threatened bombardment. Farragut did not place a guard on the top of the mint for the reashole fleet, which lay broadside on. On Sunday morning, Farragut called his officers and crew below in religious service tn had run away and that there was no movement of anybody, Farragut paused, and so the city was saved from bombardment. FaFarragut sent his boat ashore to ascertain why the flag had been taken down and was informed that it was done by some person wlag of the United States, and it had been placed there by Farragut after he took possession of the city. Upon that point I
Commissioner (search for this): chapter 12
time, and she handed me the note very nicely and quite clerkly written. Well, I said, I think I may be able to do something for you. Come back day after to-morrow and I will see what I can do. The next day I called upon the Commissioner of Internal Revenue and asked him if he had a vacancy for a woman who wrote a good hand and spelled well and was fully educated up to that class of duties. I am a good deal pressed, he said, but possibly I can make an appointment. Well, I said, Mr. Commissioner, mine is a very special case and I want you, if possible, to do it. I then told him the story and said: You see I do not care to have a recommendation from me to go upon your files. She will keep her own name and that had better not be connected with mine so as to draw observation. Very well, he said, her place will be a nine hundred dollar position. Send her with your card and she shall have it, and if she deserves it she shall hold it. She rented her house in Wytheville and t
onfederates, never hear for what purpose the city was raising a million and a quarter in bonds? Take the Prussian consul, who complains for himself and the Mrs. Vogel whom he represents, as an example. Did he know about this fund? He, a trader, a Jew, famed for a bargain, who had married the sister of the rebel secretary of war, the partner of General Reichard, late Prussian consul, then in command in the Confederate army, who subscribed for himself, his partner and Mrs. Vogel, the wife of his former partner, thirty thousand dollars--did he not know what he was doing, when he bought these bonds of this Committee of public safety ? On the contrary, ifunds to loan to the rebel authorities, and now acting Prussian consul here, doing quite as effective service to the rebels as his partner in the field. I find Mme. Vogel, late partner in the same house of Reichard & Co., now absent, whose funds are managed by that house. I find M. Paesher & Co., bankers, whose clerks and employ
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 12
for many weeks, but the order was never revoked, but, on the contrary, the government gave my administration its highest sanction. The President did not confer on me, however, the Order of the Garter. On account of that order a reward of ten thousand dollars was offered for my head; and a gentle, soft-hearted little Southern lady published that she wanted to subscribe her mite to make the reward sixty thousand dollars, so that my head would be sure to be taken. My critic, in writing Lincoln, a history, deems that the order was well enough itself, but indefensible as a matter of taste. Indeed, I had hoped that I had distinguished myself in one thing, if no more, and that is that I did not carry on war with rose-water,--a pleasant thing to do, but I did not do it. That is enough to say, as he and myself differ upon another question of taste, to which I have already adverted. These women, she-adders, more venomous than he-adders, were the insulting enemies of my army and my cou
order them to be paid into the Confederate treasury for the purpose of carrying on the war. Mrs. Slocomb was a leader in the best society of New Orleans. She had undertaken to close out the business of her deceased husband. She was a very full and fervent believer in the right and justice of secession. She equipped from her private purse the crack artillery company of New Orleans, the Washington Artillery, and sent it to the war, one of her sons being an officer, and a son-in-law, Captain Urquhart, also holding a commission in that organization. She had subscribed very liberally in aid of the rebellion, and she was upon my information very much looked up to by those engaged in carrying it on. Before the city was taken, a summons was served upon Mrs. Slocomb by a rebel court to show cause why she should not pay into the treasury of the Confederacy the amount of the debt due the Northern creditors of her deceased husband. She answered the summons in person, and declared that h
Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 12
to say, was enforced, and it is also needless to say, was the cause of protests of the foreign consuls in behalf of neutral forsworn rebels. I do not know now that I can put the whole matter of this highly beneficial order, its cause, execution, and results, in better form than that in which I explained it to the Secretary of War officially in answer to those protests, on the application of the Secretary of State:-- headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, October, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Sir:--I have the honor to report the facts and circumstances of my General Order No. 55, in answer to the complaints of the Prussian and French legations, as to the enforcement of that order upon certain inhabitants of New Orleans, claimed to be the subjects of these respective governments. Before discussing the specialty and personal relations of the several complaints, it will be necessary, in a general way, to give an account of the state of things which I f
Cora Slocomb (search for this): chapter 12
ives and to yield to the entreaties of a lady of New Orleans, Mrs. Cora Slocomb. A word of the history of this lady may not be impertinent Confederate treasury for the purpose of carrying on the war. Mrs. Slocomb was a leader in the best society of New Orleans. She had undertg it on. Before the city was taken, a summons was served upon Mrs. Slocomb by a rebel court to show cause why she should not pay into the trate authorities until after we took possession of New Orleans. Mrs. Slocomb and her daughter called upon me for a safe conduct to allow them, that would furnish a reason for an exception in their case. Mrs. Slocomb, her eyes flowing with tears, said that her house was endeared toward your country, when all else has failed, I remain, etc. Mrs. Slocomb acknowledged the favor:-- Permit me to return my sincere itizens are brave. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Cora Slocomb. I may without offence give other transactions: Soon after
Judah P. Benjamin (search for this): chapter 12
ebels, as are the heads of those who claim exemption, thus far, from this taxation, made and used for purposes above set forth, upon the ground of their neutrality; among whom I find Rochereau & Co., the senior partner of which firm took an oath of allegiance to support the constitution of the Confederate States. I find also the house of Reichard & Co., the senior partner of which, General Reichard, is in the rebel army. I find the junior partner, Mr. Kruttschnidt, the brother-in-law of Benjamin, the rebel secretary of war, using all the funds in his hands to purchase arms, and collecting the securities of his correspondents before they are due, to get funds to loan to the rebel authorities, and now acting Prussian consul here, doing quite as effective service to the rebels as his partner in the field. I find Mme. Vogel, late partner in the same house of Reichard & Co., now absent, whose funds are managed by that house. I find M. Paesher & Co., bankers, whose clerks and employees
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