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M. Paesher (search for this): chapter 12
er, Mr. Kruttschnidt, the brother-in-law of Benjamin, the rebel secretary of war, using all the funds in his hands to purchase arms, and collecting the securities of his correspondents before they are due, to get funds to loan to the rebel authorities, and now acting Prussian consul here, doing quite as effective service to the rebels as his partner in the field. I find Mme. Vogel, late partner in the same house of Reichard & Co., now absent, whose funds are managed by that house. I find M. Paesher & Co., bankers, whose clerks and employees formed a part of the French legion, organized to fight the United States, and who contributed largely to arm and equip that corps. And a Mr. Lewis, whose antecedents I have not had time to investigate. And these are fair specimens of the neutrality of the foreigners, for whom the government is called upon to interfere, to prevent their paying anything toward the relief fund for their starving countrymen. If the representatives of the foreig
John A. Stewart (search for this): chapter 12
ion even went so far, and the women-beaters and wife-whippers of England were so shocked, that they called upon their government to represent their condemnation of the order to our State Department. When their minister here brought it to the attention of our Secretary of State, Mr. Seward answered him in that easy and perfect manner with which he could turn away an application without leaving an opportunity for the interlocutor to gather offence. I quote from Seward's Life, p. 139:-- Mr. Stewart, in a very courteous manner, verbally expressed to me the opinion of Her Majesty's Government, that General Butler's order concerning the females of New Orleans who gave offence to the Union soldiers was an improper one, in respect to the expressions employed in it. I answered him that we must ask his government, in reading that proclamation, to adopt a rule of construction which the British nation had elevated to the dignity of a principle and made the motto of their national arms--Ho
ed for his principal a note, secured by mortgage, in anticipation of its being due, in order to purchase twenty-five thousand dollars of this loan. Without, however, descending into particulars, is the profitableness of the investment to be permitted to be alleged as a sufficient apology for aiding the rebellion by money and arms? If so, all their army contractors, principally Jews, should be held blameless, for they have made immense fortunes by the war. Indeed, I suppose another Jew--one Judas — thought his investment in the thirty pieces of silver was a profitable one, until the penalty of treachery reached him. When I took possession of New Orleans, I found the city nearly on the verge of starvation, but thirty days provision in it, and the poor utterly without the means of procuring what food there was to be had. I endeavored to aid the city government in the work of feeding the poor; but I soon found that the very distribution of food was a means faithlessly used to enco
George C. Strong (search for this): chapter 12
iers of the United States have been subject to repeated insults from the women (calling themselves ladies) of New Orleans, in return for the most scrupulous non-interference and courtesy on our part, it is ordered that hereafter when any female shall, by word, gesture, or movement, insult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States, she shall be regarded and held liable to he treated as a woman of the town plying her avocation. By command of Major-General Butler. Geo. C. Strong, A. A. G., Chief of Staff. Strong said, after he read it: This order may be misunderstood, General. It would be a great scandal if only one man should act upon it in the wrong way. Let us, then, was the reply, have one case of aggression on our side. I shall know how to deal with that case, so that it will never be repeated. So far, all the aggression has been against us. Here we are, conquerors in a conquered city; we have respected every right, tried every means of conciliat
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 12
. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, M. S. G. It was read by Beauregard to his army at Corinth, to inflame the Southern heart; but the onff officer reported to me that he had seized the residence of General Beauregard, finding his wife and I think a sister alone occupying it. I the sum of five hundred dollars in the Louisiana Bank left by General Beauregard as a deposit for the use of his family. This I allowed to ree, who should go to the fight at Columbus or elsewhere, under General Beauregard. It was to this fund, in the hands of this extraordinary cas to arm itself in the city and break through our lines and join Beauregard. These men, some of whom had been sergeants, were to be officersthat they were making a flag to send to a New Orleans regiment in Beauregard's army at Corinth. This flag was of the finest embroidered silk, by a party of young secession girls, making a flag to be sent to Beauregard's army. I have occasion for such a flag on the Fourth of July.
Thomas Tabb (search for this): chapter 12
, leaving a mechanic's lien upon the building of something more than eighty dollars, and the land and buildings were now to be sold to satisfy that lien. Where are you living now? I asked. She said she had come to Alexandria and was staying there with a friend, waiting to see me. Can you wait there without difficulty until I can send down and see about this matter at Wytheville? She said she would thankfully, and that I would find her story correct. I immediately sent to Col. Thomas Tabb, of Hampton, Virginia, who had been a Confederate officer, and who had afterwards been my counsel in some matters of moment. I wrote him the story and asked him to investigate it and to purchase the title to that house in the name of Mrs. Mumford, and charge the amount to me, and telegraph me if it was all right. He telegraphed me within a day or two that the matter was as I had supposed, and he would attend to it. The morning I got that despatch, Mrs. Mumford came again to my office.
D. C. G. Field (search for this): chapter 12
order have been frequent and urgent, and it is now exhausted. But the poor of this city have the same or increased necessities for relief as then, and their calls must be heard; and it is both fit and proper that the parties responsible for the present state of affairs should have the burden of their support. Therefore, the parties named in Schedules A and B, of General Order No. 55, as hereunto annexed, are assessed in like sums, and for the same purpose, and will make payment to D. C. G. Field, financial clerk, at his office, at these headquarters, on or before Monday, December 15, 1862. I was relieved by General Banks six days after. As the time this assessment was to be paid was at the expiration of seven days, and I was relieved before that time, of course nobody paid the assessment according to the order. Within thirty days General Banks found himself under the necessity of renewing the order and did so. But nobody paid the slightest attention to it and nobody paid a
they are due, to get funds to loan to the rebel authorities, and now acting Prussian consul here, doing quite as effective service to the rebels as his partner in the field. I find Mme. Vogel, late partner in the same house of Reichard & Co., now absent, whose funds are managed by that house. I find M. Paesher & Co., bankers, whose clerks and employees formed a part of the French legion, organized to fight the United States, and who contributed largely to arm and equip that corps. And a Mr. Lewis, whose antecedents I have not had time to investigate. And these are fair specimens of the neutrality of the foreigners, for whom the government is called upon to interfere, to prevent their paying anything toward the relief fund for their starving countrymen. If the representatives of the foreign governments will feed their own starving people, over whom the only protection they extend, so far as I see, is to tax them all, poor and rich, a dollar and a half each for certificates of
N. P. Banks (search for this): chapter 12
er No. 55, as hereunto annexed, are assessed in like sums, and for the same purpose, and will make payment to D. C. G. Field, financial clerk, at his office, at these headquarters, on or before Monday, December 15, 1862. I was relieved by General Banks six days after. As the time this assessment was to be paid was at the expiration of seven days, and I was relieved before that time, of course nobody paid the assessment according to the order. Within thirty days General Banks found himselfGeneral Banks found himself under the necessity of renewing the order and did so. But nobody paid the slightest attention to it and nobody paid anything afterwards on that order, and it stands to-day unrepealed, uncancelled, and unexecuted. But the necessities of the poor remained the same, and if they were relieved it must have been from some other source. But with that I have nothing to do. It may be remembered that I recognized a man parading in the mob in front of the St. Charles Hotel, wearing in his buttonhole
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 12
nd clean his face? I never heard but one other suggestion, and this was made by one of his fellow staff, who said: Why didn't you do something? What could I do, Davis, to two women? Well, said Davis, you ought to have taken your revolver and shot the first he rebel you met. But, to be serious, the colonel said to me: GeneralDavis, you ought to have taken your revolver and shot the first he rebel you met. But, to be serious, the colonel said to me: General, I can't stand this. This isn't the first time this thing has been attempted towards me, but this is the first time it has been accomplished. I want to go home. I came here to fight enemies of the country, not to be insulted and disgusted. Oh, I said, you can't resign. I'll put a stop to this. I don't think you can do ithreats of retaliatory vengeance came from the governor of Louisiana, and were circulated by all the cognate rascals south of Mason and Dixon's line, including Jefferson Davis. Mumford's wife and family were declared to be the sacred trust of the people, and his children the wards of the Confederacy. Subscription papers were immed
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