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oke favorably of the treatment they had received from you; and with all my inquiries, which were constant, I did not hear of one single instance of a lady being insulted by your command. I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, M. S. G. It was read by Beauregard to his army at Corinth, to inflame the Southern heart; but the only effect that it had upon him and them, so far as I have any evidence, was that almost immediately afterwards, on June 10 and 15, his entire army dissolved. War Correspondence, Series I., Vol. XV., p. 501. It was post hoc if not propter hoc. He was taken sick, resigned his command, and went to Bladon Springs to recover. Palmerston, however, got up in Parliament and denounced the order as unfit to be written in the English language. The only possible objectionable phrase in it was part of an ordinance of the city of London, from which I adapted it. Palmerston's indignation even went so far, and the wome
of this offense against the laws of war and his country, yet it was not believed by the rebels that Mumford would be executed. He was at the head of the gamblers of New Orleans, and was a man of considerable education, some property, and much influence with the lower class. It was said that Butler would never dare hang him, and when the parole offenders had been respited on the 4th of June, and Special Order No. 10 was issued on the 5th of June commanding that Mumford be executed on the 7th of June between 6 A. M. and 12 M., the order was received by the populace almost with derision. No good man petitioned for his release, but the bad men, the blacklegs and blackguards, assembled in large numbers and voted that he should not be executed, and that if he was executed Butler should die the death by any and every possible means. They thought some of selecting a committee to so notify me, but upon consideration it was found that it was not a popular committee upon which to serve, an
rascals south of Mason and Dixon's line, including Jefferson Davis. Mumford's wife and family were declared to be the sacred trust of the people, and his children the wards of the Confederacy. Subscription papers were immediately called for, and very considerable sums were raised to support them thereafter in comfort. The reader may be interested to know how well this was carried out. I heard and thought nothing more upon the subject, except as a passing reflection, until about the year 1869, the date not recollected, when I received a letter from a lady in Malden, Massachusetts. She wrote me in very dignified and proper terms that she was somehow interested in Mrs. Mumford, who was then in the greatest distress. Mrs. Mumford had written to her that at the time of the execution of her husband I had told her that if ever I could soften her troubles I would be glad to help her, and she asked her Massachusetts friend to send to me to ascertain if I would see her. I immediately
controversy. Although he had been clearly convicted of this offense against the laws of war and his country, yet it was not believed by the rebels that Mumford would be executed. He was at the head of the gamblers of New Orleans, and was a man of considerable education, some property, and much influence with the lower class. It was said that Butler would never dare hang him, and when the parole offenders had been respited on the 4th of June, and Special Order No. 10 was issued on the 5th of June commanding that Mumford be executed on the 7th of June between 6 A. M. and 12 M., the order was received by the populace almost with derision. No good man petitioned for his release, but the bad men, the blacklegs and blackguards, assembled in large numbers and voted that he should not be executed, and that if he was executed Butler should die the death by any and every possible means. They thought some of selecting a committee to so notify me, but upon consideration it was found that
entation and upon the representations made to me that it would be regarded as an act of pacification, shortly before the date fixed for the execution of the order, I respited the prisoners to hard labor for a long term. That was done on the 4th day of June. Meanwhile Mumford, who had torn down the flag, had been put on trial for that crime. His offence had been a most heinous one, and the dire results that might have arisen from it seemed almost providentially to have been averted. Aftehe head of the gamblers of New Orleans, and was a man of considerable education, some property, and much influence with the lower class. It was said that Butler would never dare hang him, and when the parole offenders had been respited on the 4th of June, and Special Order No. 10 was issued on the 5th of June commanding that Mumford be executed on the 7th of June between 6 A. M. and 12 M., the order was received by the populace almost with derision. No good man petitioned for his release, b
June 12th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
kship in his department, and there she remained as long as she chose to stay in office, so far as I know. I saw the boys from time to time. They called to see me with their mother and they seemed to be very gentlemanly and bright. I had one other occasion, while in New Orleans, to administer capital punishment. I certainly had no desertions reported to me that required it. The circumstances of this case are peculiar enough for narration. For something over a week prior to the 12th of June, 1862, there had been continued complaint made at my headquarters of burglaries and robberies committed in the night time in many houses and in many parts of the city. No clew was brought to me by which the offenders could be ascertained, and it became a very annoying scandal and disgrace. On the morning of the 12th I said at mess table: This system of night thieveries must be put an end to, and I am going to attend to nothing else, routine duty excepted, until it is done. When I got to
September 2nd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
than he-adders, were the insulting enemies of my army and my country, and were so treated. I have given too much space to the necessary contact I had with bad women and their adventures. But I take a little space to show that I was capable, although denominated a beast and outlaw, of dealing with the good, charitable, and religious women in a manner worthy of myself and my government. The following letter will explain itself:-- headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, Sept. 2, 1862. Madame:--I had no information until the reception of your note, that so sad a result to the sisters of your society had happened from the bombardment of Donaldsonville. I am very, very sorry that Rear-Admiral Farragut was unaware that he was injuring your establishment by his shells. Any injury must have been entirely accidental. The destruction of that town became a necessity. The inhabitants harbored a gang of cowardly guerillas, who committed every atrocity; amongst others,
February 20th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
rs mustered into the service of the country. 3d. Pledging the council to support the families of all soldiers who shall volunteer for the war. On the 3d of March, 1862, the city council authorized the mayor to issue the bonds of the city for a million dollars; and provided that the chairman of the finance committee might pay over the said bonds to the Committee of Public Safety, appointed by the common council of the city of New Orleans, as per resolution No. 8,930, approved 20th of February, 1862, in such sums as they may require for the purchase of arms and munitions of war, provisions, or to provide any means for the successful defence of the city and its approaches. And, at the same time, authorized the chairman of the finance committee to pay over $25,000 to troops mustered into the State service, who should go to the fight at Columbus or elsewhere, under General Beauregard. It was to this fund, in the hands of this extraordinary committee, so published with its obj
February 19th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
ow acting Prussian consul, who has married the sister of the rebel secretary of war, to embarrass as much as possible the United States officers here, by subscriptions to city defence fund, and groundless complaints to the Prussian minister. I have thus endeavored to give a faithful and exact account of the state of the foreign population of New Orleans, on the 15th day of February, 1862. In October, 1861, the city had voted to erect a battery out of this defence fund. On the 19th of February, 1862, the city council, by vote published and commented upon in the newspapers, placed in the hands of the Confederate General Lovell, fifty thousand dollars, to be expended by him in the defences of the city. It will, therefore, clearly appear that all the inhabitants of the city knew that the city council was raising and expending large sums for war purposes. On the 20th of the same February, the city council raised an extraordinary Committee of public safety, from the body of the
September, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
kind letter of the 6th instant was received on the 10th. You say that no one more surely than myself knows that the acts for which my government blames you were untruly reported and unjustly construed. What your intentions were when you issued the order which brought so much censure upon yourself I, of course, cannot tell; but I can testify, and do with pleasure, that nearly all of the many persons who passed through my lines, to and from New Orleans, during the months of August and September, 1862, spoke favorably of the treatment they had received from you; and with all my inquiries, which were constant, I did not hear of one single instance of a lady being insulted by your command. I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, M. S. G. It was read by Beauregard to his army at Corinth, to inflame the Southern heart; but the only effect that it had upon him and them, so far as I have any evidence, was that almost immediately afterwa
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