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of this offense against the laws of war and his country, yet it was not believed by the rebels that Mumford would be executed. He was at the head of the gamblers of New Orleans, and was a man of considerable education, some property, and much influence with the lower class. It was said that Butler would never dare hang him, and when the parole offenders had been respited on the 4th of June, and Special Order No. 10 was issued on the 5th of June commanding that Mumford be executed on the 7th of June between 6 A. M. and 12 M., the order was received by the populace almost with derision. No good man petitioned for his release, but the bad men, the blacklegs and blackguards, assembled in large numbers and voted that he should not be executed, and that if he was executed Butler should die the death by any and every possible means. They thought some of selecting a committee to so notify me, but upon consideration it was found that it was not a popular committee upon which to serve, an
oke favorably of the treatment they had received from you; and with all my inquiries, which were constant, I did not hear of one single instance of a lady being insulted by your command. I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, M. S. G. It was read by Beauregard to his army at Corinth, to inflame the Southern heart; but the only effect that it had upon him and them, so far as I have any evidence, was that almost immediately afterwards, on June 10 and 15, his entire army dissolved. War Correspondence, Series I., Vol. XV., p. 501. It was post hoc if not propter hoc. He was taken sick, resigned his command, and went to Bladon Springs to recover. Palmerston, however, got up in Parliament and denounced the order as unfit to be written in the English language. The only possible objectionable phrase in it was part of an ordinance of the city of London, from which I adapted it. Palmerston's indignation even went so far, and the wome
ably of the treatment they had received from you; and with all my inquiries, which were constant, I did not hear of one single instance of a lady being insulted by your command. I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General, M. S. G. It was read by Beauregard to his army at Corinth, to inflame the Southern heart; but the only effect that it had upon him and them, so far as I have any evidence, was that almost immediately afterwards, on June 10 and 15, his entire army dissolved. War Correspondence, Series I., Vol. XV., p. 501. It was post hoc if not propter hoc. He was taken sick, resigned his command, and went to Bladon Springs to recover. Palmerston, however, got up in Parliament and denounced the order as unfit to be written in the English language. The only possible objectionable phrase in it was part of an ordinance of the city of London, from which I adapted it. Palmerston's indignation even went so far, and the women-beaters
sassination the wife's appeal Mumford hanged eight years later Depredation harshly punished Butler's wonderful spy system a spy in every family negro servants tell all some amusing instances I want that Confederate flag, Madam, for a Fourth of July celebration in Lowell It must not be inferred that the several matters of which I treat at so much length followed one another in point of time. They were all going on at once, each pressing upon the other and each interfering with doing ----Street? Yes. Well, madam, my information is that you have been having a series of sewing bees at your house by a party of young secession girls, making a flag to be sent to Beauregard's army. I have occasion for such a flag on the Fourth of July. I hear there is to be a Sabbath school celebration of the children of my town and I want to send a Confederate flag up there to please them, for they have never seen one. Won't you please go with my orderly and get that flag and bring it h
rein prescribed. This action was concurred in by General Twiggs, then in command of the Confederate forces, and enforced by newspaper articles, published in the leading journals. This was one of the series of offensive measures which were undertaken by the mercantile community of New Orleans, of which a large portion were foreigners, and of which the complaint of Order No. 55 formed a part, in aid of the rebellion. The only cotton allowed to be shipped during the autumn and winter of 1861 and 1862, was by permits of Governor Moore, granted upon the express condition, that at least one-half in value should be returned in arms and munitions of war. In this traffic, almost the entire mercantile houses of New Orleans were engaged. Joint-stock companies were formed, shares issued, vessels bought, cargoes shipped, arms returned, immense profits realized; and the speculation and trading energy of the whole community was turned in this direction. It will be borne in mind that quite
October, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 12
n existing at New Orleans upon its capture by the federal troops, to show the status of the several classes upon which General Order No. 55 takes effect. In October, 1861, about the time Mason and Slidell left the city upon their mission to Europe, to obtain the intervention of foreign powers, great hopes were entertained by theas purchased at a foreign port. To prevent even this supply of the European manufactures became an object of the greatest interest to the rebels, and prior to October, 1861, all the principal cotton factors of New Orleans, to the number of about a hundred, united in an address, signed with their names, to the planters, advising th I have thus endeavored to give a faithful and exact account of the state of the foreign population of New Orleans, on the 15th day of February, 1862. In October, 1861, the city had voted to erect a battery out of this defence fund. On the 19th of February, 1862, the city council, by vote published and commented upon in the
cribed. This action was concurred in by General Twiggs, then in command of the Confederate forces, and enforced by newspaper articles, published in the leading journals. This was one of the series of offensive measures which were undertaken by the mercantile community of New Orleans, of which a large portion were foreigners, and of which the complaint of Order No. 55 formed a part, in aid of the rebellion. The only cotton allowed to be shipped during the autumn and winter of 1861 and 1862, was by permits of Governor Moore, granted upon the express condition, that at least one-half in value should be returned in arms and munitions of war. In this traffic, almost the entire mercantile houses of New Orleans were engaged. Joint-stock companies were formed, shares issued, vessels bought, cargoes shipped, arms returned, immense profits realized; and the speculation and trading energy of the whole community was turned in this direction. It will be borne in mind that quite two third
February 15th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
where he has been promoted for his gallantry, in the rebel service, leaving his commercial partner, Mr. Kruttschnidt, now acting Prussian consul, who has married the sister of the rebel secretary of war, to embarrass as much as possible the United States officers here, by subscriptions to city defence fund, and groundless complaints to the Prussian minister. I have thus endeavored to give a faithful and exact account of the state of the foreign population of New Orleans, on the 15th day of February, 1862. In October, 1861, the city had voted to erect a battery out of this defence fund. On the 19th of February, 1862, the city council, by vote published and commented upon in the newspapers, placed in the hands of the Confederate General Lovell, fifty thousand dollars, to be expended by him in the defences of the city. It will, therefore, clearly appear that all the inhabitants of the city knew that the city council was raising and expending large sums for war purposes. On t
February 19th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
ow acting Prussian consul, who has married the sister of the rebel secretary of war, to embarrass as much as possible the United States officers here, by subscriptions to city defence fund, and groundless complaints to the Prussian minister. I have thus endeavored to give a faithful and exact account of the state of the foreign population of New Orleans, on the 15th day of February, 1862. In October, 1861, the city had voted to erect a battery out of this defence fund. On the 19th of February, 1862, the city council, by vote published and commented upon in the newspapers, placed in the hands of the Confederate General Lovell, fifty thousand dollars, to be expended by him in the defences of the city. It will, therefore, clearly appear that all the inhabitants of the city knew that the city council was raising and expending large sums for war purposes. On the 20th of the same February, the city council raised an extraordinary Committee of public safety, from the body of the
February 20th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
rs mustered into the service of the country. 3d. Pledging the council to support the families of all soldiers who shall volunteer for the war. On the 3d of March, 1862, the city council authorized the mayor to issue the bonds of the city for a million dollars; and provided that the chairman of the finance committee might pay over the said bonds to the Committee of Public Safety, appointed by the common council of the city of New Orleans, as per resolution No. 8,930, approved 20th of February, 1862, in such sums as they may require for the purchase of arms and munitions of war, provisions, or to provide any means for the successful defence of the city and its approaches. And, at the same time, authorized the chairman of the finance committee to pay over $25,000 to troops mustered into the State service, who should go to the fight at Columbus or elsewhere, under General Beauregard. It was to this fund, in the hands of this extraordinary committee, so published with its obj
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