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London, Madison County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
d them, so far as I have any evidence, was that almost immediately afterwards, on June 10 and 15, his entire army dissolved. War Correspondence, Series I., Vol. XV., p. 501. It was post hoc if not propter hoc. He was taken sick, resigned his command, and went to Bladon Springs to recover. Palmerston, however, got up in Parliament and denounced the order as unfit to be written in the English language. The only possible objectionable phrase in it was part of an ordinance of the city of London, from which I adapted it. Palmerston's indignation even went so far, and the women-beaters and wife-whippers of England were so shocked, that they called upon their government to represent their condemnation of the order to our State Department. When their minister here brought it to the attention of our Secretary of State, Mr. Seward answered him in that easy and perfect manner with which he could turn away an application without leaving an opportunity for the interlocutor to gather offenc
y of State, was in distress whenever I did anything that caused a little whipper-snapper emissary from some government in Europe to complain of my just treatment of a man who claimed to be a consul, and this caused perpetual interference and annoyanceral Order No. 55 takes effect. In October, 1861, about the time Mason and Slidell left the city upon their mission to Europe, to obtain the intervention of foreign powers, great hopes were entertained by the rebels, that the European governments s, for the avowed reason that if it was sent, the cotton would find its way to foreign ports, and furnish the interest of Europe and the United States with the product of which they are most in need, . . . and thus contribute to the maintenance to that quasi neutrality, which European nations have thought proper to avow. This address proving ineffectual to maintain the policy we had determined upon, and which not only received the sanction of public opinion here, but which has been so promptl
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
mp, when these women came near! They brought to the bedside of the wounded and dying soldier at once the thought of home, the ministrations of religion, and such consolation as would seem only could come from the hand of the great Saviour of mankind. Many a mother, many a sister, many a wife, owe to their assiduous care a son, a brother, a husband, restored to them alive, who would otherwise have filled one of the unknown graves that dot the hills of Virginia, the plains of Georgia and Tennessee, and the swamps of Louisiana and Mississippi. These brave soldiers of the cross knew no creed, recognized no nationality. Their services were given, like those of their Master, to the human-kind. Was the sufferer before them a private soldier or a commanding general, to them there was no difference. Confederate or Federal, he was their brother. Let us turn from this to another case where I felt obliged to reverence the motives and to yield to the entreaties of a lady of New Orleans
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
w-practitioner in the Supreme Court of the United States. I had never heard that he was in any wayuld not take the oath of allegiance to the United States; that at first they had desired the preserir house should go into the service of the United States, and be occupied as my personal headquartel you made for favor and protection by the United States. Yours shall be the solitary exception to war, to embarrass as much as possible the United States officers here, by subscriptions to city detogether to overthrow the authority of the United States, and establish the very result which was t the French legion, organized to fight the United States, and who contributed largely to arm and eqed States mint. Farragut then ordered the United States flag to be placed on the government buildi place from the mint, with the flag of the United States, the companion of which he had desecrated,fe by night or by day than any city in the United States at the present hour. After my return to[15 more...]
Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
d their adventures. But I take a little space to show that I was capable, although denominated a beast and outlaw, of dealing with the good, charitable, and religious women in a manner worthy of myself and my government. The following letter will explain itself:-- headquarters Department of the Gulf, New Orleans, Sept. 2, 1862. Madame:--I had no information until the reception of your note, that so sad a result to the sisters of your society had happened from the bombardment of Donaldsonville. I am very, very sorry that Rear-Admiral Farragut was unaware that he was injuring your establishment by his shells. Any injury must have been entirely accidental. The destruction of that town became a necessity. The inhabitants harbored a gang of cowardly guerillas, who committed every atrocity; amongst others, that of firing upon an unarmed boat crowded with women and children, going up the coast, returning to their homes, many of them having been at school at New Orleans. It
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
more upon the subject, except as a passing reflection, until about the year 1869, the date not recollected, when I received a letter from a lady in Malden, Massachusetts. She wrote me in very dignified and proper terms that she was somehow interested in Mrs. Mumford, who was then in the greatest distress. Mrs. Mumford had written to her that at the time of the execution of her husband I had told her that if ever I could soften her troubles I would be glad to help her, and she asked her Massachusetts friend to send to me to ascertain if I would see her. I immediately answered I would see Mrs. Mumford any time at my office in Washington. A few days later her card came to me and she was shown in. She had aged somewhat. I told her that I had received a letter from her friend and asked the purpose of her visit. She then told me that a very considerable amount of money had been subscribed for her, but being in Confederate money it did not amount to much. At last it was entrusted to
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ionist, but I had heard that his wife was exceedingly interested on the side of the rebels, and had been ordered out of Washington by the Secretary of War for some treasonable acts. I said to him:-- I want to say to you that one of my officers haverted to that use. There was no appropriation upon which a requisition could be properly answered by the government at Washington from which to take it out of the taxes of the North. But nothing was further from my thoughts than either of these expsend to me to ascertain if I would see her. I immediately answered I would see Mrs. Mumford any time at my office in Washington. A few days later her card came to me and she was shown in. She had aged somewhat. I told her that I had received a lhall have it, and if she deserves it she shall hold it. She rented her house in Wytheville and took a small house in Washington. I saw her once in about six months or a year after that. She turned out to be a very good clerk, and was not disturb
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
e foreign born, and now claim exemption from all duties as citizens, and exemption from liabilities for all their acts, because of being foreign neutrals. When the expedition which I had the high honor to be intrusted to; command, landed at Ship Island, and seemed to threaten New Orleans, the most energetic efforts were made by the State and Confederate authorities for the defence of the city. Nearly the entire foreign population of the city enrolled itself in companies, battalions, and bri evidence that he had not been a bad boy before his connection with the gang, and being only a sort of page for them, I sentenced to prison for a short term. The man that confessed and turned State's evidence, as is the phrase, I sentenced to Ship Island at hard labor for five years. The rebel cry went all over the city: These men won't be hanged, although Mumford was. One of them is an officer on the General's yacht, and he will be smuggled off. At ten o'clock on the day fixed for the han
France (France) (search for this): chapter 12
to the Confederate generals. Many of the foreign officers took the oath of allegiance to the Confederate States. The brigadier-general in command of the European Brigade, Paul Juge, Fils, a naturalized citizen of the United States, but born in France, renounced his citizenship, and applied to the French government to be restored to his former citizenship as a native of France, at the very time he held the command of this foreign legion. The Prussian consul, now General Reichard, of the ConFrance, at the very time he held the command of this foreign legion. The Prussian consul, now General Reichard, of the Confederate army, of whom we shall have more to say in the course of this report, raised a battalion of his countrymen, and went to Virginia, where he has been promoted for his gallantry, in the rebel service, leaving his commercial partner, Mr. Kruttschnidt, now acting Prussian consul, who has married the sister of the rebel secretary of war, to embarrass as much as possible the United States officers here, by subscriptions to city defence fund, and groundless complaints to the Prussian minister.
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
of New Orleans toward Northern soldiers described some examples Butler's personal experience Spitting in officers' faces I'll put a stop to this General order no. 28 comes out it does put a stop to it how it affected the wife-whippers of England Honi soit qui mal y pense reward offered for Butler's head the other side: the noble women of New Orleans trouble with neutrals and whipper-snapper consuls Assessing wealthy Confederates to support the poor Mumford tears down the stars andt to be written in the English language. The only possible objectionable phrase in it was part of an ordinance of the city of London, from which I adapted it. Palmerston's indignation even went so far, and the women-beaters and wife-whippers of England were so shocked, that they called upon their government to represent their condemnation of the order to our State Department. When their minister here brought it to the attention of our Secretary of State, Mr. Seward answered him in that easy a
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