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d not determined his route on the 8th, assuming his now report to be true; for he says that on the 7th, I determined to push on, and put my whole force between him and Richmond; and orders were at once issued for a movement by his (the enemy's) right flank. This would bring General Grant to the James, below Richmond. Extract from General Grant's Official Report, pp. 6, 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Battle of the Wilderness was renewed by us at 5 o'clock on the morning of the 6th, and continued with unabated fury until darkness set in, each army holding substantially the same position that they had on the evening of the 5th. After dark, the enemy made a feeble attempt to turn our right flank, capturing several hundred prisoners and creating considerable confusion. But the promptness of General Sedgwick, who was personally present and commanded that part of our line, soon re-formed it and restored order. On the morning of the 7th, reconnoissances showed that the ene
und Petersburg and led to it and Richmond. Accordingly, on the morning of the 7th, I ordered Gillmore to move to his front and demonstrate against the railroad fohis command to report, for the purpose, to General Smith at eight o'clock on the 7th. I informed General Smith of this order, and also directed him to make a like dent acts toward me, censuring either my military or political conduct. On the 7th General Smith struck the railroad near Port Walthall Junction, and began its desis route on the 8th, assuming his now report to be true; for he says that on the 7th, I determined to push on, and put my whole force between him and Richmond; and ot part of our line, soon re-formed it and restored order. On the morning of the 7th, reconnoissances showed that the enemy had fallen behind his intrenched lines, wders were at once issued for a movement by his right flank. On the night of the 7th, the march was commenced towards Spottsylvania Court-House, the Fifth Corps movi
nt, in his report to the country, made fifteen months afterwards, gives a different account of the victories, full retreats, and rapid pursuit, of the days from the 6th to the 9th of May. It is not true that he had not determined his route on the 8th, assuming his now report to be true; for he says that on the 7th, I determined to push on, and put my whole force between him and Richmond; and orders were at once issued for a movement by his (the enemy's) right flank. This would bring General Gt of the 7th, the march was commenced towards Spottsylvania Court-House, the Fifth Corps moving on the most direct road. But the enemy, having become apprised of our movement, and having the shorter line, was enabled to reach there first. On the 8th, General Warren met a force of the enemy which had been sent out to oppose and delay his advance, to gain time to fortify the line taken up at Spottsylvania. This force was steadily driven back on the main force, within the recently constructed w
to gain time to fortify the line taken up at Spottsylvania. This force was steadily driven back on the main force, within the recently constructed works, after considerable fighting, resulting in severe loss to both sides. On the morning of the 9th, General Sheridan started on a raid against the enemy's lines of communication with Richmond. The 9th, 10th, and 11th were spent in manoeuvring and fighting without decisive results. No time was to be lost in attacking Petersburg upon either side2. It will be observed that one movement to take Petersburg was thus frustrated by information from headquarters through Washington which was in every substantial particular misleading and untrue. There was severe fighting on the night of the 9th, the enemy making an attack in force upon Generals Brooks and Heckman, but were handsomely repulsed. On the 10th the plan of withdrawal of the troops from Swift Creek was carried out without loss, and the railroad wholly destroyed for seven mil
etersburg as was intended, but to devote his energies to perfecting the defences at City Point and Fort Powhatan. See Appendix No. 42. It will be observed that one movement to take Petersburg was thus frustrated by information from headquarters through Washington which was in every substantial particular misleading and untrue. There was severe fighting on the night of the 9th, the enemy making an attack in force upon Generals Brooks and Heckman, but were handsomely repulsed. On the 10th the plan of withdrawal of the troops from Swift Creek was carried out without loss, and the railroad wholly destroyed for seven miles, under my personal supervision, there being no such agreement between my corps commanders as would lead them to do any other thing in unison save to protest against the plans of the commanding general. See Appendix No. 43. Generals Smith and Gillmore made separate replies to my letter. These replies did not agree with each other, and, what was of more con
, killed and wounded. See Appendix No. 45. Wishing to have the assistance of General Kautz's cavalry in the contemplated movement I gave them rest, and to put the lines in the best possible order to be held with a small force, I rested on the 11th, making ready to move by daylight on the 12th. On the 11th the following orders were issued to the corps commanders and preparations were made to carry them out:-- Headquarters in the field, May 11, 1864, 9.30 P. M. Major-General Gillmore, C11th the following orders were issued to the corps commanders and preparations were made to carry them out:-- Headquarters in the field, May 11, 1864, 9.30 P. M. Major-General Gillmore, Commanding Tenth Army Corps: A movement will be made to-morrow morning at daybreak of the troops in the manner following: General Smith will take all of his corps that can be spared from his line with safety, and will demonstrate against the enemy up the turnpike, extending his line of advance to the left, with his right resting, at the beginning of the movement, on the river at or near Howlett's house, pressing the enemy into their intrenchments with the endeavor to turn them on the left, if
Wishing to have the assistance of General Kautz's cavalry in the contemplated movement I gave them rest, and to put the lines in the best possible order to be held with a small force, I rested on the 11th, making ready to move by daylight on the 12th. On the 11th the following orders were issued to the corps commanders and preparations were made to carry them out:-- Headquarters in the field, May 11, 1864, 9.30 P. M. Major-General Gillmore, Commanding Tenth Army Corps: A movement willrarily, I came to the conclusion to take command in person of this movement so that nothing should be lost because of any disagreement between my corps commanders, neither of whom really desired that the other should succeed. At daybreak on the 12th, all the movements were made in conformity with these orders. Brigadier-General Ames' brigade was posted near Port Walthall Junction to cover our rear from the enemy's forces arriving at Petersburg from the South. The enemy met us at Proctor or
s of the lieutenant-general, General Kautz was sent with his cavalry by those roads to cut the Danville Railroad and the James River Canal. He was not able to strike the canal, but cut the road near Appomattox Station, and thence marched along the line of the road destroying it at several points, but did not succeed in destroying the Nottoway Bridge. Thence, he struck across to the Weldon Railroad again destroying it at Jarratt's Station, and thence by a detour came to City Point. On the 13th, the enemy making a stand at their line of works, General Gillmore was sent to endeavor to turn their right while Smith attacked the front. Both movements were gallantly accomplished after severe fighting. Meantime, I endeavored to have the navy advance so as to cover our right, which rested near the river, from the fire of the enemy's fleet. But from the correspondence that ensued, it was obvious that we could have no assistance from the navy above Trent's Reach. See Appendix No. 46.
emy making a stand at their line of works, General Gillmore was sent to endeavor to turn their right while Smith attacked the front. Both movements were gallantly accomplished after severe fighting. Meantime, I endeavored to have the navy advance so as to cover our right, which rested near the river, from the fire of the enemy's fleet. But from the correspondence that ensued, it was obvious that we could have no assistance from the navy above Trent's Reach. See Appendix No. 46. On the 14th, General Smith drove the enemy from the first line of works, which we occupied. In the morning of that day I received a telegram from the Secretary of War stating that a despatch just received reported a general attack by Grant, in which great success was achieved; that Hancock had captured Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson's division, and taken him and Early, and forty cannon, and that the prisoners were counted by thousands. See Appendix No. 47. Twelve hours later the Secretary of War sent me
capture Chaffin's farm on his side of the river, where there were about two hundred men. See Appendix No. 51. But in any event I desired that he send up a force along the north bank of the James to search for torpedoes, and the wires and batteries by which they may be discharged, with instructions to burn any house in which such machines were found, and send to me any persons captured having anything to do with them. I also asked for a personal interview at the earliest moment. On the 15th General Sheridan called on me at the front, and in conference with him I learned that he thought it would take seven or eight days to refit the horses and men of his command to make his return march. Trusting that General Grant would be with me before that time, and deeming that if General Sheridan's command, numbering four thousand effective men, were encamped on the right of my lines near Howlett's house, where there was an admirable place for a cavalry encampment, that it would be so much
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