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Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
lps, Gen. Thomas Williams, and General Sherman. The latter died from heart failure very soon after he joined me. I had no better soldier or officer, none in whose care I felt any more safe to leave everything in possession, than General Phelps. I had got him his promotion in 1861, and asked to have him transferred to the Army of the Gulf. He had but one fault: he was an anti-slavery man to a degree that utterly unbalanced his judgment. While in command of a portion of the troops on Ship Island in the Gulf of Mexico near the State of Mississippi, he, in the winter of 1861-62, upon his own motion, issued a proclamation of emancipation of the slaves. No notice was taken of it, as it was simply a dead letter. He disciplined his troops very admirably, and upon my arrival in New Orleans, I put him in command of the forces stationed above the city at Carrolton. The history of that command I have already stated. Differing with me on the slavery questions because I held that nothing
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
e disbanded, and used to conquer and subdue loyal States. Fourth. By the restoration of the rebel authority in their respective States, they would be enabled to re-establish slavery. Fifth. It might furnish a ground of responsibility by the Federal Government to pay the rebel debt, and certainly subjects loyal citizens of the rebel States to debts contracted by rebels in the name of the States. Sixth. It put in dispute the existence of loyal State governments, and the new State of West Virginia, which had been recognized by every department of the United States Government. Seventh. It practically abolished the confiscation laws, and relieved rebels of every degree who had slaughtered our people, from all pains and penalties for their crimes. Eighth. It gave terms that had been deliberately, repeatedly, and solemnly rejected by President Lincoln, and better terms than the rebels had ever asked in their most prosperous condition. Ninth. It formed no basis of true
Utah (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
apters. He also died while serving as brigadier-general in the regular army. While at New Orleans, Col. J. W. Shaffer, a personal friend of Mr. Lincoln, was detailed to me as chief quartermaster, in which capacity he served upon my staff. He also went with me to the Army of the James, and was there promoted to be chief of my staff. He served as such until he went home in the summer of 1864 suffering with a disease which afterwards caused his death, having been appointed governor of Utah Territory. His services, although not of a character that makes men so distinguished in a campaign as to find a place in history, were of the greatest value in whatever position he found himself. With Colonel Shaffer there was sent to me Brig.-Gen. J. W. Turner. He had graduated at West Point. He was my chief commissary, and afforded me very great and efficient aid in seeing to the provisioning not only of the army, but of a large portion of the people of New Orleans, including a very great
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
My commissary was my brother, of whom I see no occasion to speak further. My surgeon in this department was my neighbor and family physician, Dr. Gilman Kimball, one of the ablest and most skilful surgeons of our State. While I was at Annapolis, I found it necessary to establish hospitals, meaning to make an extensive depot hospital for the sick soldiers who would be forwarded to Washington through Annapolis. I called upon the surgeon-general to furnish me a surgeon for that purpose,Annapolis. I called upon the surgeon-general to furnish me a surgeon for that purpose, and was told that none could be spared, and that I must furnish myself. I called upon Doctor Kimball, who put aside his most lucrative practice, and came down there to serve his country. When I left the Department of Annapolis he accompanied me to Fortress Monroe to see to it that my hospitals were properly organized. The army hospitals there, being only for two or at most three companies of regular troops, would not answer for the sick from the ranks of fifteen thousand men. As soon as his
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
The latter died from heart failure very soon after he joined me. I had no better soldier or officer, none in whose care I felt any more safe to leave everything in possession, than General Phelps. I had got him his promotion in 1861, and asked to have him transferred to the Army of the Gulf. He had but one fault: he was an anti-slavery man to a degree that utterly unbalanced his judgment. While in command of a portion of the troops on Ship Island in the Gulf of Mexico near the State of Mississippi, he, in the winter of 1861-62, upon his own motion, issued a proclamation of emancipation of the slaves. No notice was taken of it, as it was simply a dead letter. He disciplined his troops very admirably, and upon my arrival in New Orleans, I put him in command of the forces stationed above the city at Carrolton. The history of that command I have already stated. Differing with me on the slavery questions because I held that nothing could be done about freeing the slave, except t
Turquie (Turkey) (search for this): chapter 21
spoken of Colonel Kensel as having carried a second order through a line of fire on May 16, 1864; Captain Martin was my aid who took the first one. In the early part of the campaign two very young men came to me with high recommendations. One was Sidney B. DeKay, of New York, whom I accepted as an aid although he had not reached his majority. His services were so energetic and faithful that he remained on my personal staff until the last. After the war was over, a war broke out between Turkey and Greece, and he went to Athens and took a position in the Greek army, serving with great distinction until he received an accidental wound from the falling of a carbine which disabled him from further service. Later he served as assistant district-attorney of the United States of the city of New York, and remained one of my most valued friends until his death, a short time ago. The other was Mr. John I. Davenport, of Brooklyn, New York, who came to me as a stenographer. I soon emplo
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
efore the right of suffrage should be accorded to them. I advised and so urged that the States in rebellion should be divided into territories held under military control for a sufficient length of time to teach them that the lost cause and the lost Confederation was utterly obliterated and to be forgotten. I advised that those territories should be given specific names. For instance, Virginia should be the territory of Potomac; North Carolina, the territory of Cape Fear; South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, the territory of Jackson; Louisiana, the territory of Jefferson; Texas, the territory of Houston, and Arkansas, the territory of Lincoln. I believed that the lines of those territories should be so drawn as to cut up the boundaries of the original-States so that there should be nothing of State pride left. By their proceedings the people of these States had forfeited all honorable mention, and when they should be fit to come back into the Union,--which they would have been a
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ng staff positions in the army, and especially at Washington in time of peace, who have been educated at West ed the First Brigade of Massachusetts troops into Washington in April, 1861 I had but three staff officers. Tl for the sick soldiers who would be forwarded to Washington through Annapolis. I called upon the surgeon-genhief commissary, who served until the detail from Washington of Shaffer and Turner. When I was sent to New t, and from time to time when I happened to be in Washington, where indeed I was much of the time, he talked we night of the 14th of April, I took the train at Washington for New York, and in the morning met in the trainsination. On the night of April 16 I returned to Washington in order to be present to give aly assistance in this crisis of the country. I remained in Washington for some time in conference with Mr, Stanton, who was sert here the reasons given by the authorities at Washington for rejecting the convention of Sherman and Johns
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
arshal, took Colonel French's place on my staff when he was promoted, and showed himself to be a brave, determined, and thorough executive officer who fully executed the duty devolved upon him by all orders. Afterwards he commanded a brigade in Hinks' division of colored troops in the Army of the James. He is not now living. I had detailed upon my staff Lieut. J. W. Cushing, of the Thirty-First Massachusetts Volunteers, as acting chief quartermaster, and Lieut. James E. Esterbrook, of Worcester, of the Thirtieth Massachusetts, as acting chief commissary, who served until the detail from Washington of Shaffer and Turner. When I was sent to New Orleans I had three brigadier-generals assigned to me: Gen. J. W. Phelps, Gen. Thomas Williams, and General Sherman. The latter died from heart failure very soon after he joined me. I had no better soldier or officer, none in whose care I felt any more safe to leave everything in possession, than General Phelps. I had got him his pro
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
exertions that we had an army in better health than any other army in the field. He continued to serve with me until his own health failed. He died in the city of New York several years after the war. He was one of the truest friends I ever had. Lieut.-Col. Jonas H. French was also upon my staff for a short time in New Orlental wound from the falling of a carbine which disabled him from further service. Later he served as assistant district-attorney of the United States of the city of New York, and remained one of my most valued friends until his death, a short time ago. The other was Mr. John I. Davenport, of Brooklyn, New York, who came to mehich he has shown since for many years, so that he has made a proud name for himself in the service of the government as chief supervisor of elections in the city of New York for many years, coupled with his great energy, enabled him to render John I. Davenport. almost invaluable service to the country. I showed his reports of
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