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Sacramento (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
of the bar got to Washington to be admitted. But I had the fortune to have drawn the specification for the patent of Elias Howe, a native of Massachusetts, for his invention of the sewing machine. This brought me there to argue a motion in that court, but I did not do so as the case was settled. The first important case that I argued in the Supreme Court was in 1857. It was Sutter vs. the United States. Sutter had been fortunate enough to find gold in the raceway of his sawmill near Sacramento in 1849. The case involved the effect of the laws and action of the provincial governors of Mexico in granting titles to very extended parcels of lands. The rules which should govern the distribution of that land and the validity of titles to such land under our treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo were under discussion in that case. It was a leading case upon those questions and affected the title of real property to the value of many millions. The case brought me somewhat before the people of
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
be accounted for sent down in advance of the usual time. We had a hearing upon that, and that was also decided against us last Monday. Now, then, I said, the patient being dead and buried, and the sexton having gone home to supper, you come to me for resurrection. I must say that I see no earthly opportunity; the rule of the Supreme Court is that it will have but one rehearing in a case. But, said he, it is much to us; we have got seventeen more just such cases with other counties in Iowa or elsewhere, and they will all bring suits. Well, said I, when they bring another suit I will endeavor to do something for you if I can, but it is no use for me to look into this record, this case is a by-gone. Well, all the same I want you to look into the record of this case and tell me what is your charge? I ought not to charge anything, for it will do you no good. But I do not read such records for fun; but if you insist upon it, after what I have told you, I will examine it,
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 23
as this:-- The son of a very warm friend had been on board the ship Storm King at Hong Kong in China. The Storm King had prepared for a race from Hong Kong to London with another clipper ship, so she was obliged to start as nearly as might be when her rival did. My client was third mate, but owing to some claimed misunderstandt it was not done. Indeed, all the fresh meat on board consisted of a small pig, and that was disposed of on the cabin table. The vessel made a direct course to London, beating her competitor, I believe. A part of the crew were Chinamen, and by the time they got past the Cape of Good Hope the whole crew were affected with the scurvy. To such an extent did this prevail that when the vessel anchored in London, out of her crew of twenty-six men, as I remember the numbers, all but seven had to be hoisted over the side because it was impossible for them to help themselves. Among them was my client. After examining the question I brought suit against the
Waltham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
I have a curious incident of that: A man of about twenty-six or twenty-seven years of age broke into a small way station or depot of the Fitchburg railroad in Waltham,Mass., but did not find anything there which he chose to take away. He was seen in the act of departing on the train and went up the road a few miles to Lincoln.ght or nine years of age and the prisoner. The constable was about closing up his depot and said to the man, whose name was Carey: I have got to take you back to Waltham, but it is dinner-time, and if you will go into the house with me, --which was a little distance from the depot--we will have some dinner before we go. He had ry, breaking and entering, include almost every description of building save a depot or railroad station house, and the evidence was that he broke into a depot in Waltham. If that was not within the statute, it was a breaking and entering not a felony, for which the constable could not arrest him without a warrant, and therefore t
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ne anecdote of him in this respect, and that shall suffice for the hundreds that I might recall. The General was a member of our House of Representatives one year when his party was in a hopeless and impotent minority, except on such occasions as he contrived to make it efficient by tactics and strategems of a technical, parliamentary character. The speaker was a Whig, and a thorough partisan. The Whigs were well drilled and had a leader on the floor of very great capacity, Mr. Lord, of Salem. During one angry debate, General Butler attempted to strangle an obnoxious proposal of the majority by tactics. Accordingly he precipitated upon the chair divers questions of order and regularity of proceeding, one after the other. These were debated by Mr. Lord and himself, and then decided by the speaker uniformly according to the notions advanced by Mr. Lord. The General bore this for some time without special complaint, contenting himself with raising new questions. At length, howe
Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
in preparing cases I have had to spend days in a machine shop, and I will state a case in which that happened, as an encouragement and an instruction to my young friends of the bar as to how I think a case should be prepared. In November of the year 1852, it will be remembered, General Franklin Pierce of New Hampshire was elected President. In the December following, himself, his wife, and only son, a lad about ten years old, got on board the cars at Boston to go to their home at Concord, New Hampshire. When about twenty-four or twenty-five miles from Boston, and between two and three miles from the town of Andover, the train was derailed by the breaking of the forward axle of the tender on the left side. The train happened to be on a slight curve and along a high embankment built up largely of rubblestone. By the shock the cars were thrown from the track, and some of them went down the embankment. The President and his wife were substantially unhurt, but the son, who was stand
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
rd carefully and see if there is any way we can save ourselves. What will you charge to do that thoroughly and give us a written opinion? Looking ruefully at that thick record I said: I should not like to state a price without knowing something about the case. Perhaps I shall not choose to give an opinion at all. You appear to be a gentleman of intelligence; please state your case so that I may see what it is. I am acting, said he, in behalf of the American Emigrant Aid Society of Connecticut. Our business has been procuring lands in the western country, generally those denominated swamp lands, and settling emigrants upon them. We got a large quantity of such swamp lands of Adams County, Iowa,after considerable negotiation. They gave our trustee a full deed of them, and we paid them by building a court-house for them, which they received as payment on account, Benj. F. Butler in 1856. from a photograph. and by paying the balance in money at the price agreed. Afterwards
Andover (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ew Hampshire. When about twenty-four or twenty-five miles from Boston, and between two and three miles from the town of Andover, the train was derailed by the breaking of the forward axle of the tender on the left side. The train happened to be onng to attract their attention had happened to the train after it left Boston. They said there had not until they got to Andover, but passing the street at Andover they struck a very severe blow on a frog, which afterwards was found to have been misAndover they struck a very severe blow on a frog, which afterwards was found to have been misplaced, and although they slowed up the speed of the train they could see no evil effects from this, and therefore went on until the time of the accident, when suddenly the axle broke and the train was derailed. They said on the next morning theyws were used in preparing the end of the other axle than the broken axle received in going the distance from the frog in Andover to where the derailment took place. I then put on the testimony of my engineer and fireman, who gave their evidence in
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
went down to supply himself one morning through one of the principal streets of Lowell. Whenever he saw a key left in the door lock, and the owner of the shop not in of Breckinridge. He was to make a report of his doings to his constituents at Lowell. The meeting was called to be held at night. Dissatisfaction existed in the p and of its mere existence few there present would confess a knowledge. The Lowell Advertiser? said the clerk, with disdainful nonchalance, I don't know such a prm Carey was indicted for murder, and in the April term of the Supreme Court at Lowell he was arraigned and pleaded not guilty. Now, there is a custom which has behat there is not one word of truth in it. I Views at General Butler's home at Lowell. Sleeping Apartment. have not felt it my duty to expose it before because I th a girl's wages. The exact facts are these:-- We had a rule in our mills in Lowell, and a very proper one, among the eight or ten incorporated manufactories, that
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 23
r the patent of Elias Howe, a native of Massachusetts, for his invention of the sewing machine. This brought me there to argue a motion in that court, but I did not do so as the case was settled. The first important case that I argued in the Supreme Court was in 1857. It was Sutter vs. the United States. Sutter had been fortunate enough to find gold in the raceway of his sawmill near Sacramento in 1849. The case involved the effect of the laws and action of the provincial governors of Mexico in granting titles to very extended parcels of lands. The rules which should govern the distribution of that land and the validity of titles to such land under our treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo were under discussion in that case. It was a leading case upon those questions and affected the title of real property to the value of many millions. The case brought me somewhat before the people of the Western country, and I have had occasion to argue quite a number of cases since involving questio
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