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Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
my, which had retreated hastily from Bowling Green to and through Nashville, a city of so much importance to the South, that it was at one tih his division to Clarksville, fifty miles above Donelson, toward Nashville, and on the 27th went himself to Nashville to meet and confer witNashville to meet and confer with General Buell, but returned to Donelson the next day. Meantime, General Halleck at St. Louis must have felt that his armies were gettinthe 28th, I learn you were at Fort Donelson, and General Smith at Nashville, from which I infer you could not have received orders. Halleck's telegram of last night says: Who sent Smith's division to Nashville? I ordered it across to the Tennessee, where they are wanted immediate; others for General Grant, and still others for General Buell at Nashville and at the same time I was organizing out of the new troops that ie was provoked that Generals Grant and Smith had turned aside to Nashville. In the mean time several of the gunboats, under Captain Phelps,
Pea Ridge, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
h we disembarked and marched out about ten miles toward Corinth, to a place called Monterey or Pea Ridge, where the rebels had a cavalry regiment, which of course decamped on our approach, but from tand I shall this morning move directly out on the Corinth road, about eight miles to or toward Pea Ridge, which is a key-point to the southwest. General Hurlbut's division will be landed to-day, avalry, sent from Purdy about 2 P. M. yesterday. I hear there is a force of two regiments on Pea Ridge, at the point where the Purdy and Corinth roads come together. I am satisfied we cannot reaude a semicircle of three miles, and push a strong reconnoissance as far out as Lick Creek and Pea Ridge. I will send down a good many boats to-day, to be employed as you may direct; and would be ad returned. This was after night. I infer that the enemy is in some considerable force at Pea Ridge, that yesterday morning they crossed a brigade of two regiments of infantry, one regiment of c
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
Paducah a division for myself when allowed to take the field, which I had been promised by General Halleek. His purpose was evidently to operate up the Tennessee River, to break up Bear Creek Bridge and the railroad communications between the Mississippi and Tennessee Rivers, and no doubt lie was provoked that Generals Grant and Smith had turned aside to Nashville. In the mean time several of the gunboats, under Captain Phelps, United States Navy, had gone up the Tennessee as far as Florence,an invading army; that our purpose was to move forward in force, make a lodgment on the Memphis & Charleston road, and thus repeat the grand tactics of Fort Donelson, by separating the rebels in the interior from those at Memphis and on the Mississippi River. We did not fortify our camps against an attack, because we had no orders to do so, and because such a course would have made our raw men timid. The position was naturally strong, with Snake Creek on our right, a deep, bold stream, with a
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
he Army of the Tennessee, Major-General Grant, at Forts Henry and Donelson; and General S. R. Curtis, in Southeded by boat, or by a rickety telegraph-line up to Fort Henry, which lay entirely in a hostile country, and was St. Louis, March 1, 1862. To General Grant, Fort Henry: Transports will be sent you as soon as possibms. Competent officers should be left to command Forts Henry and Donelson in your absence. I have indicated iarksville. General Smith's division will come to Fort Henry, or a point higher up on the Tennessee River; traill immediately have small garrisons detailed for Forts Henry and Donelson, and all other forces made ready forhe Cumberland for you, or, if you march across to Fort Henry, then to send them up the Tennessee. G. W. Cullu in command of expedition, and remain yourself at Fort Henry. Why do you not obey my orders to report strengtaltic, Shenango, and Marengo. We steamed up to Fort Henry, the river being high and in splendid order. The
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
rbable silence. After the battle, a constant stream of civilian surgeons, and sanitary commission agents, men and women, came up the Tennessee to bring relief to the thousands of maimed and wounded soldiers for whom we had imperfect means of shelter and care. These people caught up the camp-stories, which on their return home they retailed through their local papers, usually elevating their own neighbors into heroes, but decrying all others. Among them was Lieutenant-Governor Stanton, of Ohio, who published in Belfontaine, Ohio, a most abusive article about General Grant and his subordinate generals. As General Grant did not and would not take up the cudgels, I did so. My letter in reply to Stanton, dated June 10, 1862, was published in the Cincinnati Commercial soon after its date. To this Lieutenant-Governor Stanton replied, and I further rejoined in a letter dated July 12, 1862. These letters are too personal to be revived. By this time the good people of the North had begu
Snake Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
d W. H. L. Wallace's divisions, which formed a line to our rear. Lew Wallace's division remained on the north side of Snake Creek, on a road leading from Savannah or Crump's Landing to Purdy. General C. F. Smith remained back at Savannah, in chiorders to do so, and because such a course would have made our raw men timid. The position was naturally strong, with Snake Creek on our right, a deep, bold stream, with a confluent (Owl Creek) to our right front; and Lick Creek, with a similar conpt on the road was frustrated, and accordingly have placed McDowell's brigade to our right front, guarding the pass of Snake Creek; Stuart's brigade to the left front, to watch the pass of Lick Creek; and I shall this morning move directly out on thh less vehemence, and continued up to dark. Early at night the division of Lew Wallace arrived from the other side of Snake Creek, not having fired a shot. A very small part of General Buell's army was on our side of the Tennessee River that eveni
Danville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
ported by infantry, may by rapid movements reach these points from the river, without any serious opposition. Avoid any general engagements with strong forces. It will be better to retreat than to risk a general battle. This should be strongly impressed on the officers sent with expeditions from the river. General C. F. Smith or some very discreet officer should be selected for such commands. Having accomplished these objects, or such of them as may be practicable, you will return to Danville, and move on Paris. Perhaps the troops sent to Jackson and Humboldt can reach Paris by land as easily as to return to the transports. This must depend on the character of the roads and the position of the enemy. All telegraphic lines which can be reached must be cut. The gunboats will accompany the transports for their protection. Any loyal Tennesseeans who desire it, may be enlisted and supplied with arms. Competent officers should be left to command Forts Henry and Donelson in your
Purdy (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
es back, three of the brigades covering the roads to Purdy and Corinth, and the other brigade (Stuart's) temporn a road leading from Savannah or Crump's Landing to Purdy. General C. F. Smith remained back at Savannah, ilearn, there are five regiments of rebel infantry at Purdy; at Corinth, and distributed along the railroad to Iey, retire, again fire and retire. The force on the Purdy road attacked and driven by Major Bowman yesterday, about five companies of Tennessee cavalry, sent from Purdy about 2 P. M. yesterday. I hear there is a force M.--Just back; have been half-way to Corinth and to Purdy. All right. Have just read this letter, and approv from an extensive reconnoissance toward Corinth and Purdy, and am strongly impressed with the importance of thhr, on the extreme right, guarding the bridge on the Purdy road over Owl Creek. Second Brigade, composed of ttery — still at Shiloh — to fall back as far as the Purdy and Hamburg road, and for McDowell and Buckland to a
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
my designed to pass my left flank, and fall upon Generals McClernand and Prentiss, whose line of camps was almost parallel with the Tennessee River, and about two miles back from it. Very soon the sound of artillery and musketry announced that General Prentiss was engaged; and about 9 A. M. I judged that he was falling back. About this time Appler's regiment broke in disorder, followed by Mungen's regiment, and the enemy pressed forward on Waterhouse's battery thereby exposed. The three Illinois regiments in immediate support of this battery stood for some time; but the enemy's advance was so vigorous, and the fire so severe, that when Colonel Raith, of the Forty-third Illinois, received a severe wound and fell from his horse, his regiment and the others manifested disorder, and the enemy got possession of three guns of this (Waterhouse's) battery. Although our left was thus turned, and the enemy was pressing our whole line, I deemed Shiloh so important, that I remained by it and
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 11
Chapter 9: battle of Shiloh. March and April, 1862. In the middle of February, 1862, Major-General Halleck commanded all the armies in the valley of the Mississippi, from his headquarters in St. Louis. These were, the Army of the Ohio, Major-General Buell, in Kentucky; the Army of the Tennessee, Major-General Grant, at Forts Henry and Donelson; and General S. R. Curtis, in Southern Missouri. He posted his chief of staff, General Cullum, at Cairo, and me at Paducah, chiefly to expedite and facilitate tile important operations then in progress up the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers. Fort Donelson surrendered to General Grant on the 16th of February, and there must have been a good deal of confusion resulting from the necessary care of the wounded, and disposition of prisoners, common to all such occasions, and there was a real difficulty in communicating between St. Louis and Fort Donelson. General Buell had also followed up the rebel army, which had retreated hastily from
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