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Shreveport (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 15
Adjutant-General. On the 19th of December I was at Bridgeport, and gave all the orders necessary for the distribution of the four divisions of the Fifteenth Corps along the railroad from Stevenson to Decatur, and the part of the Sixteenth Corps, commanded by General Dodge, along the railroad from Decatur to Nashville, to make the needed repairs, and to be in readiness for the campaign of the succeeding year; and on the 21st I went up to Nashville, to confer with General Grant and conclude the arrangements for the winter. At that time General Grant was under the impression that the next campaign would be up the valley of East Tennessee, in the direction of Virginia; and as it was likely to be the last and most important campaign of the war, it became necessary to set free as many of the old troops serving along the Mississippi River as possible. This was the real object and purpose of the Meridian campaign, and of Banks's expedition up Red River to Shreveport during that winter.
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 15
Adjutant-General. On the 19th of December I was at Bridgeport, and gave all the orders necessary for the distribution of the four divisions of the Fifteenth Corps along the railroad from Stevenson to Decatur, and the part of the Sixteenth Corps, commanded by General Dodge, along the railroad from Decatur to Nashville, to make the needed repairs, and to be in readiness for the campaign of the succeeding year; and on the 21st I went up to Nashville, to confer with General Grant and conclude the arrangements for the winter. At that time General Grant was under the impression that the next campaign would be up the valley of East Tennessee, in the direction of Virginia; and as it was likely to be the last and most important campaign of the war, it became necessary to set free as many of the old troops serving along the Mississippi River as possible. This was the real object and purpose of the Meridian campaign, and of Banks's expedition up Red River to Shreveport during that winter.
East Chickamauga Creek (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 15
ht flank on that part of the ridge abutting on Chickamauga Creek, near the tunnel; and he proposed that we shou Grant's orders to pursue on the north side of Chickamauga Creek headquarters military division of the Miline of Missionary Hills, with its terminus on Chickamauga Creek, the point that I was expected to take, hold, on-bridge was also built at the same time over Chickamauga Creek, near its mouth, giving communication with thee column of direction, following substantially Chickamauga Creek; the centre, General John E. Smith, in columnsof General Morgan L. Smith's closed the gap to Chickamauga Creek, two of General John E. Smith's were drawn bac rode to the extreme left of our position near Chickamauga Creek; thence up the hill, held by General Lightburn to march at once by the pontoon-bridge across Chickamauga Creek, at its mouth, and push forward for the depot.), and had been posted to connect my left with Chickamauga Creek. He was ordered to repair an old broken bridg
Bridgeport, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 15
reached Knoxville I thought our troops there were actually in danger of starvation. Having supplied General Burnside all the help he wanted, we began our leisurely return to Chattanooga, which we reached on the 16th ; when General Grant in person ordered me to restore to General Thomas the divisions of Howard and Davis, which belonged to his army, and to conduct my own corps (the Fifteenth) to North Alabama for winter-quarters. headquarters Department and Army of the Tennessee, Bridgeport, Alabama, December 19, 1863. Briaadier-General John A. Rawlins, Chief of Staff to General Grant, Chattanooga. General: For the first time, I am now at leisure to make an official record of events with which the troops under my command have been connected during the eventful campaign which has just closed. During the month of September last, the Fifteenth Army Corps, which I had the honor to command, lay in camps along the Big Black, about twenty miles east of Vicksburg, Mississippi. It
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 15
would make him a hero. I explained to him, that we were getting ready to go for Joe Johnston at Dalton, that I expected to be in the neighborhood of Atlanta about the 4th of July, and wanted the bridMy plan is to move your forces out gradually until they reach the railroad between Cleveland and Dalton. Granger will move up the south side of the Tennessee with a column of twenty thousand men, takward to cross Taylor's Ridge, and strike the railroad which comes from the north by Cleveland to Dalton. Hooker's troops were roughly handled at Ringgold, and the pursuit was checked. Receiving a noent of Howard; where I met General Grant, and learned that the rebels had again retreated toward Dalton. He gave orders to discontinue the pursuit, as he meant to turn his attention to General BurnsiRed Clay, or the Council-Ground, there to destroy a large section of the railroad which connects Dalton and Cleveland. This work was most successfully and fully accomplished that day. The division of
Lancaster, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 15
casket, and had a military funeral, the battalion of the Thirteenth United States Regulars acting as escort from the Gayoso Hotel to the steamboat Grey Eagle, which conveyed him and my family up to Cairo, whence they proceeded to our home at Lancaster, Ohio, where he was buried. I here give my letter to Captain C. C. Smith, who commanded the battalion at the time, as exhibiting our intense feelings: Gayoso house, Memphis Tennessee, October 4, 1863--Midnight. Captain C. C. Smith, commandT. Sherman, Major-General. Long afterward, in the spring of 1867, we had his body disinterred and brought to St. Louis, where he is now buried in a beautiful spot, in Calvary Cemetery, by the side of another child, Charles, who was born at Lancaster, in the summer of 1864, died early, and was buried at Notre Dame, Indiana. His body was transferred at the same time to the same spot. Over Willie's grave is erected a beautiful marble monument, designed and executed by the officers and soldi
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 15
Cleveland, and the next day we reached the Hiawassee at Charleston, where the Chattanooga & Knoxville Railroad crosses it. e Dalton & Cleveland road. On the 30th the army moved to Charleston, General Howard approaching so rapidly that the enemy evther was bitter cold. I had already reached the town of Charleston, when General Wilson arrived with a letter from General ut Benton and Columbus. I left my aide, Major McCoy, at Charleston, to communicate with this cavalry and hurry it forward. Ford and Sweetwater, to Athens, with a guard forward at Charleston, to hold and repair the bridge which the enemy had retaktly, on a report from General Howard that the enemy held Charleston, I diverted General Ewing's division to Athens, and wentm and the division of General Morgan L. Smith to move to Charleston, to which point I had previously ordered the corps of Gevalry properly be longing to the Fifteenth Army Corps-at Charleston, and with the remainder moved by easy marches, by Clevel
Cleveland, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 15
to hold out that length of time. My plan is to move your forces out gradually until they reach the railroad between Cleveland and Dalton. Granger will move up the south side of the Tennessee with a column of twenty thousand men, taking no wagonached Ringgold. There I detached Howard to cross Taylor's Ridge, and strike the railroad which comes from the north by Cleveland to Dalton. Hooker's troops were roughly handled at Ringgold, and the pursuit was checked. Receiving a note from Genersee River, whereas none remained in Chattanooga. Accordingly, on the 29th of November, my several columns marched to Cleveland, and the next day we reached the Hiawassee at Charleston, where the Chattanooga & Knoxville Railroad crosses it. The ray of McDaniel's Gap, and General Blair with two divisions of the Fifteenth Corps by way of Julien's Gap, all meeting at Cleveland that night. Here another good break was made in the Dalton & Cleveland road. On the 30th the army moved to Charleston,
New Market (Alabama, United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 15
ll more; so there was no alternative but to turn up Elk River by way of Gilbertsboro, Elkton, etc., to the stone bridge at Fayetteville, where we crossed the Elk, and proceeded to Winchester and Deckerd. At Fayetteville I received orders from General Grant to come to Bridgeport with the Fifteenth Army Corps, and to leave General Dodge's command at Pulaski, and along the railroad from Columbia to Decatur. I instructed General Blair to follow with the Second and First Divisions by way of New Market, Larkinsville, and Bellefonte, while I conducted the other two divisions by way of Deckerd; the Fourth Division crossing the mountain to Stevenson, and the Third by University Place and Swedon's Cove. In person I proceeded by Swedon's Cove and Battle Creek, reaching Bridgeport on the night of November 13th. I immediately telegraphed to the commanding general my arrival, and the positions of my several divisions, and was summoned to Chattanooga. I took the first steamboat during the ni
United States (United States) (search for this): volume 1, chapter 15
the Army, Washington, D. C., October 16, 1863. Major-General U. S. Grant, Louisville. General: You will receive herewith the orders of the President of the United States, placing you in command of the Departments of the Ohio, Cumberland, and Tennessee. The organization of these departments will be changed as you may deem most esolution tendering the thanks of Congress to Major-General W. T. Sherman and others. Be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the thanks of Congress and of the people of the United States are due, and that the same are hereby tendered, to Major-GeneraUnited States are due, and that the same are hereby tendered, to Major-General W. T. Sherman, commander of the Department and Army of the Tennessee, and the officers and soldiers who served under him, for their gallant and arduous services in marching to the relief of the Army of the Cumberland, and for their gallantry and heroism in the battle of Chattanooga, which contributed in a great degree to the succ
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