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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore).

Found 6,288 total hits in 2,599 results.

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10. Virginia to the North. thus speaks the sovereign Old Dominion to Northern States her frank opinion: first. move not A finger: 'tis coercion, The signal for our prompt dispersion. Second. wait, till I make ny full decision, Be it for union or division. Third. If I declare my ultimatum, accept my terms, as I shall state 'em. Fourth. then — I'll remain, while I'm inclined to, Seceding when I have a mind to. --Commercial Advertiser, March Zzz
Robert Anderson (search for this): chapter 100
An incident at the forts.--At an early hour yesterday morning, while the gunners were firing blank cartridges from the guns of the Iron Battery at Cumming's Point, one of the guns, loaded with ball, the men not being aware of the fact, was discharged. The ball struck the wharf of Fort Sumter, close to the gate. This, it appears, caused some excitement in the garrison of Sumter, for three or four of the ports fronting Cumming's Point were soon after thrown open. No warlike reply to the unintentional shot was given, however; and about two hours afterwards a boat was sent over to explain the occurrence to Major Anderson. The Major received the messenger in good part, and thus the matter ended, after having caused no little talk at the harbor forts and in the city.--Charleston Mercury, 19th March.
Cumming's Point (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 100
An incident at the forts.--At an early hour yesterday morning, while the gunners were firing blank cartridges from the guns of the Iron Battery at Cumming's Point, one of the guns, loaded with ball, the men not being aware of the fact, was discharged. The ball struck the wharf of Fort Sumter, close to the gate. This, it appears, caused some excitement in the garrison of Sumter, for three or four of the ports fronting Cumming's Point were soon after thrown open. No warlike reply to the une. This, it appears, caused some excitement in the garrison of Sumter, for three or four of the ports fronting Cumming's Point were soon after thrown open. No warlike reply to the unintentional shot was given, however; and about two hours afterwards a boat was sent over to explain the occurrence to Major Anderson. The Major received the messenger in good part, and thus the matter ended, after having caused no little talk at the harbor forts and in the city.--Charleston Mercury, 19th March.
Winfield Scott (search for this): chapter 101
rable to withdraw all the troops, except two or three men, rather than incur the bloodshed which will probably occur before troops and supplies are put into it, is now to be decided. The immediate necessity of settling this question, grows out of the fact, that there is only a limited supply of bread at Fort Sumter, but plenty of salt meat, and that it must either be re-supplied or abandoned very soon. The question has been under discussion in high military circles for several days. Gen. Scott advises that reinforcements cannot now be put in, without an enormous sacrifice of life. Of course his views on the subject, cannot be known officially to the public; but he is understood to say that we have neither military nor naval force at hand, sufficient to supply the fort against the threatened-opposition, which it would require twenty thousand men to overcome. Besides, if it should initiate civil war, in addition to uniting the South and overwhelming the Union sentiment there in
Washington, March 10.--The question of reinforcing Fort Sumter has been under consideration in the Cabinet, and it is understood that the question whether or no it is not desirable to withdraw all the troops, except two or three men, rather than incur the bloodshed which will probably occur before troops and supplies are put into it, is now to be decided. The immediate necessity of settling this question, grows out of the fact, that there is only a limited supply of bread at Fort Sumter, but plenty of salt meat, and that it must either be re-supplied or abandoned very soon. The question has been under discussion in high military circles for several days. Gen. Scott advises that reinforcements cannot now be put in, without an enormous sacrifice of life. Of course his views on the subject, cannot be known officially to the public; but he is understood to say that we have neither military nor naval force at hand, sufficient to supply the fort against the threatened-opposition,
ther military nor naval force at hand, sufficient to supply the fort against the threatened-opposition, which it would require twenty thousand men to overcome. Besides, if it should initiate civil war, in addition to uniting the South and overwhelming the Union sentiment there in the waves, of passion, it would require two hundred and fifty thousand Government soldiers to carry on the struggle, and a hundred millions of money to begin with. In such an event, twenty thousand men would, be needed to preserve Washington and the Government archives. The general impression here on the streets is that the Administration has determined on withdrawing the troops from Fort Sumter, leaving only one Corporal, two men, and the Stars and Stripes, compelling the chivalry to capture the fort after all. They have been threatening to do it for three months, and failed when there were only about seventy men in it. They may have an opportunity to accomplish it against only three.--Times, March 11.
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 101
Washington, March 10.--The question of reinforcing Fort Sumter has been under consideration in the Cabinet, and it is understood that the question whether or no it is not desirable to withdraw all the troops, except two or three men, rather than incur the bloodshed which will probably occur before troops and supplies are put into it, is now to be decided. The immediate necessity of settling this question, grows out of the fact, that there is only a limited supply of bread at Fort Sumter, ent there in the waves, of passion, it would require two hundred and fifty thousand Government soldiers to carry on the struggle, and a hundred millions of money to begin with. In such an event, twenty thousand men would, be needed to preserve Washington and the Government archives. The general impression here on the streets is that the Administration has determined on withdrawing the troops from Fort Sumter, leaving only one Corporal, two men, and the Stars and Stripes, compelling the chiva
In New York city a bill was found posted on the sheriff's bulletin, this morning, for recruits for the army of Georgia. Its appearance in the absence of any local excitement, created considerable amusement. The bill had the appearance of having been folded in a letter, and its recipient doubtless stuck it up among the sheriff's auction notices for a sell. --Commercial Advertiser, March 7.
7, called Shay's insurrection, in Massachusetts. The third was in 1794, popularly called The whisky insurrection of Pennsylvania. The fourth was in 1814, by the Hartford Convention Federalists. The fifth--on which occasion the different sections of the Union came into collision — was in 1820, under the administration of President Monroe, and occurred on the question of the admission of Missouri into the Union. The sixth was a collision between the Legislature of Georgia and the Federal Government, in regard to certain lands, given by the latter to the Creek Indians. The seventh was in 1820, with the Cherokees, in Georgia. The eighth was the memorable nullifying ordinance of South Carolina, in 1832. The ninth was in 1842, and occurred in Rhode Island, between the Suffrage Association and the State authorities. The tenth was in 1856, on the part of the Mormons, who resisted Federal authority. The eleventh, the present (1861) rebellion in the Southern States.
7, called Shay's insurrection, in Massachusetts. The third was in 1794, popularly called The whisky insurrection of Pennsylvania. The fourth was in 1814, by the Hartford Convention Federalists. The fifth--on which occasion the different sections of the Union came into collision — was in 1820, under the administration of President Monroe, and occurred on the question of the admission of Missouri into the Union. The sixth was a collision between the Legislature of Georgia and the Federal Government, in regard to certain lands, given by the latter to the Creek Indians. The seventh was in 1820, with the Cherokees, in Georgia. The eighth was the memorable nullifying ordinance of South Carolina, in 1832. The ninth was in 1842, and occurred in Rhode Island, between the Suffrage Association and the State authorities. The tenth was in 1856, on the part of the Mormons, who resisted Federal authority. The eleventh, the present (1861) rebellion in the Southern States.
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