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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 13 total hits in 4 results.

Yankee Doodle (search for this): chapter 167
rved in the Northwest in the second war with Great Britain, and took part in the battle of the Thames and other fights. During the late Secession tornado over Kentucky, the cadets, affected with the fever, talked pretty severely against those devoted to the Stars and Stripes. The old veteran listened, but said nothing. One evening he went into the room of our informant, and seemed to be in something of a passion. Hie paced. backward and forward, saying nothing, and refusing to answer all questions. At last he pulled out his fife, and, sitting down, sent forth Yankee Doodle with its shrillest strains. Then he played Hail Columbia, and then The Star-spangled Banner, while the tears rolled down his aged and weather-beaten cheeks. Concluding that, he jumped to his feet, and exclaimed: Now, d — n 'em, I guess they know which side I'm on! He and our informant instantly gave three cheers for the Union; and they will both stand by it until death. Kentucky has plenty of such men.
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 167
The Cincinnati Times says: A friend, who is just from the Military Institute, located near Frankfort, Ky., tells a good one. He says the institution employs a fifer who served in the Northwest in the second war with Great Britain, and took part in the battle of the Thames and other fights. During the late Secession tornado over Kentucky, the cadets, affected with the fever, talked pretty severely against those devoted to the Stars and Stripes. The old veteran listened, but said nothing. One evening he went into the room of our informant, and seemed to be in something of a passion. Hie paced. backward and forward, saying nothing, and refusing to answer all questions. At last he pulled out his fife, and, sitting down, sent forth Yankee Doodle with its shrillest strains. Then he played Hail Columbia, and then The Star-spangled Banner, while the tears rolled down his aged and weather-beaten cheeks. Concluding that, he jumped to his feet, and exclaimed: Now, d — n 'em, I gues
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 167
near Frankfort, Ky., tells a good one. He says the institution employs a fifer who served in the Northwest in the second war with Great Britain, and took part in the battle of the Thames and other fights. During the late Secession tornado over Kentucky, the cadets, affected with the fever, talked pretty severely against those devoted to the Stars and Stripes. The old veteran listened, but said nothing. One evening he went into the room of our informant, and seemed to be in something of a pasuestions. At last he pulled out his fife, and, sitting down, sent forth Yankee Doodle with its shrillest strains. Then he played Hail Columbia, and then The Star-spangled Banner, while the tears rolled down his aged and weather-beaten cheeks. Concluding that, he jumped to his feet, and exclaimed: Now, d — n 'em, I guess they know which side I'm on! He and our informant instantly gave three cheers for the Union; and they will both stand by it until death. Kentucky has plenty of such men.
Frankfort (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 167
The Cincinnati Times says: A friend, who is just from the Military Institute, located near Frankfort, Ky., tells a good one. He says the institution employs a fifer who served in the Northwest in the second war with Great Britain, and took part in the battle of the Thames and other fights. During the late Secession tornado over Kentucky, the cadets, affected with the fever, talked pretty severely against those devoted to the Stars and Stripes. The old veteran listened, but said nothing. One evening he went into the room of our informant, and seemed to be in something of a passion. Hie paced. backward and forward, saying nothing, and refusing to answer all questions. At last he pulled out his fife, and, sitting down, sent forth Yankee Doodle with its shrillest strains. Then he played Hail Columbia, and then The Star-spangled Banner, while the tears rolled down his aged and weather-beaten cheeks. Concluding that, he jumped to his feet, and exclaimed: Now, d — n 'em, I guess