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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 211
The following has been placarded on all the dead walls in the upper part of the city of New York: conditions of peace required of the so-called seceded States. Art. 1. Unconditional submission to the Government of the United States. Art. 2. To, deliver up one hundred of the Arch Traitors to be hung. Art. 3. To put on record the names of all others who have been traitorous to the Government, who shall be held infamous and disfranchised forever. Art. 4. The property of all traitors to be confiscated to pay the damage. Art. 5. The seceded States to pay the balance of the expense, and to restore all stolen property. Art. 6. The payment of all debts due to Northerners, and indemnity for all indignities to persons, loss of time, life, and property. Art. 7. The removal of the cause of all our difficulties, which can only be done by the immediate and unconditional abolition of slavery. Art. 8. Until a full compliance with all the above terms, the so-called seced
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 211
The following has been placarded on all the dead walls in the upper part of the city of New York: conditions of peace required of the so-called seceded States. Art. 1. Unconditional submission to the Government of the United States. Art. 2. To, deliver up one hundred of the Arch Traitors to be hung. Art. 3. To put on record the names of all others who have been traitorous to the Government, who shall be held infamous and disfranchised forever. Art. 4. The property of all traife, and property. Art. 7. The removal of the cause of all our difficulties, which can only be done by the immediate and unconditional abolition of slavery. Art. 8. Until a full compliance with all the above terms, the so-called seceded States to be held and governed as United States territory. The above is the least an indignant people will accept, outraged as they have been by the foulest and most heinous and gigantic instance of crime recorded in history.--N. Y. Express, April 26.
deliver up one hundred of the Arch Traitors to be hung. Art. 3. To put on record the names of all others who have been traitorous to the Government, who shall be held infamous and disfranchised forever. Art. 4. The property of all traitors to be confiscated to pay the damage. Art. 5. The seceded States to pay the balance of the expense, and to restore all stolen property. Art. 6. The payment of all debts due to Northerners, and indemnity for all indignities to persons, loss of time, life, and property. Art. 7. The removal of the cause of all our difficulties, which can only be done by the immediate and unconditional abolition of slavery. Art. 8. Until a full compliance with all the above terms, the so-called seceded States to be held and governed as United States territory. The above is the least an indignant people will accept, outraged as they have been by the foulest and most heinous and gigantic instance of crime recorded in history.--N. Y. Express, April 26.