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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 17 total hits in 6 results.

Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 228
When Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, in command of the Massachusetts regiment, landed at Annapolis, Md., some of the authorities protested against the passage of Massachusetts troops over Maryland soil; when he replied: Sir, we came here not as citizens of Massachusetts, but as citizens of and soldiers of the United States, with no intention to invade any State, but to protect the capital of our common country from invasion. We shall give no cause of offence; but there must be no fugitive shots oiment, landed at Annapolis, Md., some of the authorities protested against the passage of Massachusetts troops over Maryland soil; when he replied: Sir, we came here not as citizens of Massachusetts, but as citizens of and soldiers of the United States, with no intention to invade any State, but to protect the capital of our common country from invasion. We shall give no cause of offence; but there must be no fugitive shots or stray bricks on the way. --N. Y. Commercial Advertiser, April 26.
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 228
When Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, in command of the Massachusetts regiment, landed at Annapolis, Md., some of the authorities protested against the passage of Massachusetts troops over Maryland soil; when he replied: Sir, we came here not as citizens of Massachusetts, but as citizens of and soldiers of the United States, with no intention to invade any State, but to protect the capital of our common country from invasion. We shall give no cause of offence; but there must be no fugitive shots or stray bricks on the way. --N. Y. Commercial Advertiser, April 26.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 228
When Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, in command of the Massachusetts regiment, landed at Annapolis, Md., some of the authorities protested against the passage of Massachusetts troops over Maryland soil; when he replied: Sir, we came here not as citizens of Massachusetts, but as citizens of and soldiers of the United States, with no intention to invade any State, but to protect the capital of our common country from invasion. We shall give no cause of offence; but there must be no fugitive shots or stray bricks on the way. --N. Y. Commercial Advertiser, April 26.
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 228
When Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, in command of the Massachusetts regiment, landed at Annapolis, Md., some of the authorities protested against the passage of Massachusetts troops over Maryland soil; when he replied: Sir, we came here not as citizens of Massachusetts, but as citizens of and soldiers of the United States, with no intention to invade any State, but to protect the capital of our common country from invasion. We shall give no cause of offence; but there must be no fugitive shots or stray bricks on the way. --N. Y. Commercial Advertiser, April 26.
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 228
When Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, in command of the Massachusetts regiment, landed at Annapolis, Md., some of the authorities protested against the passage of Massachusetts troops over Maryland soil; when he replied: Sir, we came here not as citizens of Massachusetts, but as citizens of and soldiers of the United States, with no intention to invade any State, but to protect the capital of our common country from invasion. We shall give no cause of offence; but there must be no fugitive shots or stray bricks on the way. --N. Y. Commercial Advertiser, April 26.
When Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, in command of the Massachusetts regiment, landed at Annapolis, Md., some of the authorities protested against the passage of Massachusetts troops over Maryland soil; when he replied: Sir, we came here not as citizens of Massachusetts, but as citizens of and soldiers of the United States, with no intention to invade any State, but to protect the capital of our common country from invasion. We shall give no cause of offence; but there must be no fugitive shots or stray bricks on the way. --N. Y. Commercial Advertiser, April 26.