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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 25 total hits in 9 results.

Fort Bliss (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 239
An Irish regular.--The following dialogue really took place between Lieutenant A. C. C----d, late of the United States Texan army, and Pat Fletcher, one of the privates of the Second Cavalry, now at Car. lisle, then near Fort Bliss:-- Officer — Well, Pat, ain't you going to follow the General (Twiggs)? Pat--If Gineral Scott ordhers us to folly him, sir, begor Toby (Pat's horse) can gallop as well as the best of 'em. Officer — I mean, won't you leave the abolition army, and join the ow, Lieutenant, and I'm going not to disgrace naither IV my countries. Officer — Do you know that you will have to fire on green Irish colors, in the Southern ranks? Pat--And won't you have to fire on them colors, (pointing to the flag at Fort Bliss,) that yerself and five of us licked nineteen rangers under? Sure, it isn't a greater shame for an Irishman to fire on Irish colors, than for an American to fire on American colors. An’ th' oath'll be on my side, you know, Lieutenant. Off
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 239
rish regular.--The following dialogue really took place between Lieutenant A. C. C----d, late of the United States Texan army, and Pat Fletcher, one of the privates of the Second Cavalry, now at Car. lisle, then near Fort Bliss:-- Officer — Well, Pat, ain't you going to follow the General (Twiggs)? Pat--If Gineral Scott ordhers us to folly him, sir, begor Toby (Pat's horse) can gallop as well as the best of 'em. Officer — I mean, won't you leave the abolition army, and join the free South? Pat--Begor I never enlisted in th' abolition army, and never will. I agreed to sarve Uncle Sam for five year, and, the divil a pin mark was made in the contract, with my consint, ever since. When my time is up, if. the army isn't the same as it is now, I won't join it agin. Officer — Pat, the Second (Cavalry) was eighteen months old when you and I joined. The man who raised our gallant regiment is now the Southern President; the man who so lately commanded it, is now a Southern Gen<
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 239
An Irish regular.--The following dialogue really took place between Lieutenant A. C. C----d, late of the United States Texan army, and Pat Fletcher, one of the privates of the Second Cavalry, now at Car. lisle, then near Fort Bliss:-- Officer — Well, Pat, ain't you going to follow the General (Twiggs)? Pat--If Gineral Scott ordhers us to folly him, sir, begor Toby (Pat's horse) can gallop as well as the best of 'em. Officer — I mean, won't you leave the abolition army, and join the free South? Pat--Begor I never enlisted in th' abolition army, and never will. I agreed to sarve Uncle Sam for five year, and, the divil a pin mark was made in the contract, with my consint, ever since. When my time is up, if. the army isn't the same as it is now, I won't join it agin. Officer — Pat, the Second (Cavalry) was eighteen months old when you and I joined. The man who raised our gallant regiment is now the Southern President; the man who so lately commanded it, is now a Sout<
ow at Car. lisle, then near Fort Bliss:-- Officer — Well, Pat, ain't you going to follow the General (Twiggs)? Pat--If Pat--If Gineral Scott ordhers us to folly him, sir, begor Toby (Pat's horse) can gallop as well as the best of 'em. Officer — I mePat's horse) can gallop as well as the best of 'em. Officer — I mean, won't you leave the abolition army, and join the free South? Pat--Begor I never enlisted in th' abolition army, and nePat--Begor I never enlisted in th' abolition army, and never will. I agreed to sarve Uncle Sam for five year, and, the divil a pin mark was made in the contract, with my consint, ev't the same as it is now, I won't join it agin. Officer — Pat, the Second (Cavalry) was eighteen months old when you and Ithern General. Can you remain in it, when they are gone? Pat--Well, you see, the fact of the matther is, Lieut. C., I ainave to fire on green Irish colors, in the Southern ranks? Pat--And won't you have to fire on them colors, (pointing to the Officer — D — n the man that relies on Paddies, I say. Pat--The same compliments to desarters, your honor.--N. Y.
Pat Fletcher (search for this): chapter 239
An Irish regular.--The following dialogue really took place between Lieutenant A. C. C----d, late of the United States Texan army, and Pat Fletcher, one of the privates of the Second Cavalry, now at Car. lisle, then near Fort Bliss:-- Officer — Well, Pat, ain't you going to follow the General (Twiggs)? Pat--If Gineral Scott ordhers us to folly him, sir, begor Toby (Pat's horse) can gallop as well as the best of 'em. Officer — I mean, won't you leave the abolition army, and join the free South? Pat--Begor I never enlisted in th' abolition army, and never will. I agreed to sarve Uncle Sam for five year, and, the divil a pin mark was made in the contract, with my consint, ever since. When my time is up, if. the army isn't the same as it is now, I won't join it agin. Officer — Pat, the Second (Cavalry) was eighteen months old when you and I joined. The man who raised our gallant regiment is now the Southern President; the man who so lately commanded it, is now a South<
Winfield Scott (search for this): chapter 239
An Irish regular.--The following dialogue really took place between Lieutenant A. C. C----d, late of the United States Texan army, and Pat Fletcher, one of the privates of the Second Cavalry, now at Car. lisle, then near Fort Bliss:-- Officer — Well, Pat, ain't you going to follow the General (Twiggs)? Pat--If Gineral Scott ordhers us to folly him, sir, begor Toby (Pat's horse) can gallop as well as the best of 'em. Officer — I mean, won't you leave the abolition army, and join the free South? Pat--Begor I never enlisted in th' abolition army, and never will. I agreed to sarve Uncle Sam for five year, and, the divil a pin mark was made in the contract, with my consint, ever since. When my time is up, if. the army isn't the same as it is now, I won't join it agin. Officer — Pat, the Second (Cavalry) was eighteen months old when you and I joined. The man who raised our gallant regiment is now the Southern President; the man who so lately commanded it, is now a Sout<
An Irish regular.--The following dialogue really took place between Lieutenant A. C. C----d, late of the United States Texan army, and Pat Fletcher, one of the privates of the Second Cavalry, now at Car. lisle, then near Fort Bliss:-- Officer — Well, Pat, ain't you going to follow the General (Twiggs)? Pat--If Gineral Scott ordhers us to folly him, sir, begor Toby (Pat's horse) can gallop as well as the best of 'em. Officer — I mean, won't you leave the abolition army, and join the free South? Pat--Begor I never enlisted in th' abolition army, and never will. I agreed to sarve Uncle Sam for five year, and, the divil a pin mark was made in the contract, with my consint, ever since. When my time is up, if. the army isn't the same as it is now, I won't join it agin. Officer — Pat, the Second (Cavalry) was eighteen months old when you and I joined. The man who raised our gallant regiment is now the Southern President; the man who so lately commanded it, is now a South<
An Irish regular.--The following dialogue really took place between Lieutenant A. C. C----d, late of the United States Texan army, and Pat Fletcher, one of the privates of the Second Cavalry, now at Car. lisle, then near Fort Bliss:-- Officer — Well, Pat, ain't you going to follow the General (Twiggs)? Pat--If Gineral Scott ordhers us to folly him, sir, begor Toby (Pat's horse) can gallop as well as the best of 'em. Officer — I mean, won't you leave the abolition army, and join the free South? Pat--Begor I never enlisted in th' abolition army, and never will. I agreed to sarve Uncle Sam for five year, and, the divil a pin mark was made in the contract, with my consint, ever since. When my time is up, if. the army isn't the same as it is now, I won't join it agin. Officer — Pat, the Second (Cavalry) was eighteen months old when you and I joined. The man who raised our gallant regiment is now the Southern President; the man who so lately commanded it, is now a South<
--Well, you see, the fact of the matther is, Lieut. C., I ain't much of a scholar; I can't argue the question with you, but what would my mother say, if I desarted my colors? Oh, the divil a give — in I'll ever give in, now, and that's the ind of it. I tried to run away once, a few weeks after enlistin, but a man wouldn't be missed thin. It's quite different now, Lieutenant, and I'm going not to disgrace naither IV my countries. Officer — Do you know that you will have to fire on green Irish colors, in the Southern ranks? Pat--And won't you have to fire on them colors, (pointing to the flag at Fort Bliss,) that yerself and five of us licked nineteen rangers under? Sure, it isn't a greater shame for an Irishman to fire on Irish colors, than for an American to fire on American colors. An’ th' oath'll be on my side, you know, Lieutenant. Officer — D — n the man that relies on Paddies, I say. Pat--The same compliments to desarters, your honor.--N. Y. Commercial, April 29