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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 245
nsent that Lincoln & Co. shall take advantage of our former loyalty to the old Union, and turn it to the support of Black Republicanism under the guise of defending a broken, dissevered Government. No! to a man, without a dissenting voice, we rally under the Southern flag. We have been driven from a conservative position by the mad, stubborn folly of fanaticism, to turn our thoughts from patriotic reminiscences and memories, and soar to the azure field and broader stripes of your Confederate ensign, hoping its constellation will soon number many more glittering jewels. We implored peace; we offered the Crittenden resolutions; Virginia came as a pacific messenger; she sought a Peace Conference; Kentucky and other noble States stood by her side, but all were indignantly spurned, and now we have fallen back with one heart, one impulse, upon our reserved rights, prepared to defend and maintain them at every hazard. Endurance has ceased to be a virtue.--Cor. N. O. Picayune, April 30.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 245
Baltimore, Md., April 23.--There is but one feeling now in Maryland, and that is for our own State, and a united South. We cannot consent that Lincoln & Co. shall take advantage of our former loyalty to the old Union, and turn it to the support of Black Republicanism under the guise of defending a broken, dissevered Government. No! to a man, without a dissenting voice, we rally under the Southern flag. We have been driven from a conservative position by the mad, stubborn folly of fanaticism, to turn our thoughts from patriotic reminiscences and memories, and soar to the azure field and broader stripes of your Confederate ensign, hoping its constellation will soon number many more glittering jewels. We implored peace; we offered the Crittenden resolutions; Virginia came as a pacific messenger; she sought a Peace Conference; Kentucky and other noble States stood by her side, but all were indignantly spurned, and now we have fallen back with one heart, one impulse, upon our reserv
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 245
Baltimore, Md., April 23.--There is but one feeling now in Maryland, and that is for our own State, and a united South. We cannot consent that Lincoln & Co. shall take advantage of our former loyalty to the old Union, and turn it to the support of Black Republicanism under the guise of defending a broken, dissevered Government. No! to a man, without a dissenting voice, we rally under the Southern flag. We have been driven from a conservative position by the mad, stubborn folly of fanaticism, to turn our thoughts from patriotic reminiscences and memories, and soar to the azure field and broader stripes of your Confederate ensign, hoping its constellation will soon number many more glittering jewels. We implored peace; we offered the Crittenden resolutions; Virginia came as a pacific messenger; she sought a Peace Conference; Kentucky and other noble States stood by her side, but all were indignantly spurned, and now we have fallen back with one heart, one impulse, upon our reserv
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 245
Baltimore, Md., April 23.--There is but one feeling now in Maryland, and that is for our own State, and a united South. We cannot consent that Lincoln & Co. shall take advantage of our former loyalty to the old Union, and turn it to the support of Black Republicanism under the guise of defending a broken, dissevered Government. No! to a man, without a dissenting voice, we rally under the Southern flag. We have been driven from a conservative position by the mad, stubborn folly of fanaticism, to turn our thoughts from patriotic reminiscences and memories, and soar to the azure field and broader stripes of your Confederate ensign, hoping its constellation will soon number many more glittering jewels. We implored peace; we offered the Crittenden resolutions; Virginia came as a pacific messenger; she sought a Peace Conference; Kentucky and other noble States stood by her side, but all were indignantly spurned, and now we have fallen back with one heart, one impulse, upon our reser
Baltimore, Md., April 23.--There is but one feeling now in Maryland, and that is for our own State, and a united South. We cannot consent that Lincoln & Co. shall take advantage of our former loyalty to the old Union, and turn it to the support of Black Republicanism under the guise of defending a broken, dissevered Government. No! to a man, without a dissenting voice, we rally under the Southern flag. We have been driven from a conservative position by the mad, stubborn folly of fanaticism, to turn our thoughts from patriotic reminiscences and memories, and soar to the azure field and broader stripes of your Confederate ensign, hoping its constellation will soon number many more glittering jewels. We implored peace; we offered the Crittenden resolutions; Virginia came as a pacific messenger; she sought a Peace Conference; Kentucky and other noble States stood by her side, but all were indignantly spurned, and now we have fallen back with one heart, one impulse, upon our reserv
nsent that Lincoln & Co. shall take advantage of our former loyalty to the old Union, and turn it to the support of Black Republicanism under the guise of defending a broken, dissevered Government. No! to a man, without a dissenting voice, we rally under the Southern flag. We have been driven from a conservative position by the mad, stubborn folly of fanaticism, to turn our thoughts from patriotic reminiscences and memories, and soar to the azure field and broader stripes of your Confederate ensign, hoping its constellation will soon number many more glittering jewels. We implored peace; we offered the Crittenden resolutions; Virginia came as a pacific messenger; she sought a Peace Conference; Kentucky and other noble States stood by her side, but all were indignantly spurned, and now we have fallen back with one heart, one impulse, upon our reserved rights, prepared to defend and maintain them at every hazard. Endurance has ceased to be a virtue.--Cor. N. O. Picayune, April 30.