hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Washington (United States) 273 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 184 0 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 166 2 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 122 0 Browse Search
Robert Anderson 116 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 109 3 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 106 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 97 1 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 95 5 Browse Search
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) 82 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 32 total hits in 10 results.

Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 320
his term expires, and he is the military commander-in-chief of the State; but we can keep Kentucky in the Union--if you will let us. When a beardless boy, I left my father's home in Kentucky, and marched, with thousands of brave companions, to your frontiers, then invaded by hostile civilized and savage foes. I do not boast of what I did, but truthful history will tell you that I poured out my blood freely on your soil, and for nearly fifty years I have been incapable of manual labor. And is Kentucky to be rewarded now by having her soil invaded by the sons whose mothers we protected? Is my house to be fired, over the heads of my children and grandchildren, by the children of those for whose sake I staked my life, and suffered innumerable hardships in 1812-13? The answer is with Ohio. We have resisted official coercion in Kentucky; let no power on earth tempt or drive you to bloody outrage now. Very truly your old friend, Leslie Coombs. --N. Y. Evening Post, May 7.
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 320
General Leslie Coombs, of Kentucky, writes to a friend in Cincinnati, under date of April 27, as follows:-- We could not control the Governor and his coconspirators, but we appealed to the people, and on next Saturday we expect to elect John J. Crittenden, James Guthrie, and others, to a brotherly peace conference--by a majority unparalleled heretofore in Kentucky. I shall not be surprised at fifty thousand. The destructionists, anticipating their fate, have recently resolved to abandon the contest. Then, in Heaven's name 1 let us alone — keep the peace on your side of the river, and we will give treason such a rebuke in Old Kentucky that it will never again dare to raise its hideous head among us. We cannot turn our Governor out of office till his term expires, and he is the military commander-in-chief of the State; but we can keep Kentucky in the Union--if you will let us. When a beardless boy, I left my father's home in Kentucky, and marched, with thousands of brav
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 320
General Leslie Coombs, of Kentucky, writes to a friend in Cincinnati, under date of April 27, as follows:-- We could not control the Governor and his coconers, to a brotherly peace conference--by a majority unparalleled heretofore in Kentucky. I shall not be surprised at fifty thousand. The destructionists, anticipatipires, and he is the military commander-in-chief of the State; but we can keep Kentucky in the Union--if you will let us. When a beardless boy, I left my father's home in Kentucky, and marched, with thousands of brave companions, to your frontiers, then invaded by hostile civilized and savage foes. I do not boast of what I dioil, and for nearly fifty years I have been incapable of manual labor. And is Kentucky to be rewarded now by having her soil invaded by the sons whose mothers we proin 1812-13? The answer is with Ohio. We have resisted official coercion in Kentucky; let no power on earth tempt or drive you to bloody outrage now. Very truly
Leslie Coombs (search for this): chapter 320
General Leslie Coombs, of Kentucky, writes to a friend in Cincinnati, under date of April 27, as follows:-- We could not control the Governor and his coconspirators, but we appealed to the people, and on next Saturday we expect to elect John J. Crittenden, James Guthrie, and others, to a brotherly peace conference--by a majority unparalleled heretofore in Kentucky. I shall not be surprised at fifty thousand. The destructionists, anticipating their fate, have recently resolved to abis Kentucky to be rewarded now by having her soil invaded by the sons whose mothers we protected? Is my house to be fired, over the heads of my children and grandchildren, by the children of those for whose sake I staked my life, and suffered innumerable hardships in 1812-13? The answer is with Ohio. We have resisted official coercion in Kentucky; let no power on earth tempt or drive you to bloody outrage now. Very truly your old friend, Leslie Coombs. --N. Y. Evening Post, May 7.
John J. Crittenden (search for this): chapter 320
General Leslie Coombs, of Kentucky, writes to a friend in Cincinnati, under date of April 27, as follows:-- We could not control the Governor and his coconspirators, but we appealed to the people, and on next Saturday we expect to elect John J. Crittenden, James Guthrie, and others, to a brotherly peace conference--by a majority unparalleled heretofore in Kentucky. I shall not be surprised at fifty thousand. The destructionists, anticipating their fate, have recently resolved to abandon the contest. Then, in Heaven's name 1 let us alone — keep the peace on your side of the river, and we will give treason such a rebuke in Old Kentucky that it will never again dare to raise its hideous head among us. We cannot turn our Governor out of office till his term expires, and he is the military commander-in-chief of the State; but we can keep Kentucky in the Union--if you will let us. When a beardless boy, I left my father's home in Kentucky, and marched, with thousands of brav
James Guthrie (search for this): chapter 320
General Leslie Coombs, of Kentucky, writes to a friend in Cincinnati, under date of April 27, as follows:-- We could not control the Governor and his coconspirators, but we appealed to the people, and on next Saturday we expect to elect John J. Crittenden, James Guthrie, and others, to a brotherly peace conference--by a majority unparalleled heretofore in Kentucky. I shall not be surprised at fifty thousand. The destructionists, anticipating their fate, have recently resolved to abandon the contest. Then, in Heaven's name 1 let us alone — keep the peace on your side of the river, and we will give treason such a rebuke in Old Kentucky that it will never again dare to raise its hideous head among us. We cannot turn our Governor out of office till his term expires, and he is the military commander-in-chief of the State; but we can keep Kentucky in the Union--if you will let us. When a beardless boy, I left my father's home in Kentucky, and marched, with thousands of bra
his term expires, and he is the military commander-in-chief of the State; but we can keep Kentucky in the Union--if you will let us. When a beardless boy, I left my father's home in Kentucky, and marched, with thousands of brave companions, to your frontiers, then invaded by hostile civilized and savage foes. I do not boast of what I did, but truthful history will tell you that I poured out my blood freely on your soil, and for nearly fifty years I have been incapable of manual labor. And is Kentucky to be rewarded now by having her soil invaded by the sons whose mothers we protected? Is my house to be fired, over the heads of my children and grandchildren, by the children of those for whose sake I staked my life, and suffered innumerable hardships in 1812-13? The answer is with Ohio. We have resisted official coercion in Kentucky; let no power on earth tempt or drive you to bloody outrage now. Very truly your old friend, Leslie Coombs. --N. Y. Evening Post, May 7.
his term expires, and he is the military commander-in-chief of the State; but we can keep Kentucky in the Union--if you will let us. When a beardless boy, I left my father's home in Kentucky, and marched, with thousands of brave companions, to your frontiers, then invaded by hostile civilized and savage foes. I do not boast of what I did, but truthful history will tell you that I poured out my blood freely on your soil, and for nearly fifty years I have been incapable of manual labor. And is Kentucky to be rewarded now by having her soil invaded by the sons whose mothers we protected? Is my house to be fired, over the heads of my children and grandchildren, by the children of those for whose sake I staked my life, and suffered innumerable hardships in 1812-13? The answer is with Ohio. We have resisted official coercion in Kentucky; let no power on earth tempt or drive you to bloody outrage now. Very truly your old friend, Leslie Coombs. --N. Y. Evening Post, May 7.
is term expires, and he is the military commander-in-chief of the State; but we can keep Kentucky in the Union--if you will let us. When a beardless boy, I left my father's home in Kentucky, and marched, with thousands of brave companions, to your frontiers, then invaded by hostile civilized and savage foes. I do not boast of what I did, but truthful history will tell you that I poured out my blood freely on your soil, and for nearly fifty years I have been incapable of manual labor. And is Kentucky to be rewarded now by having her soil invaded by the sons whose mothers we protected? Is my house to be fired, over the heads of my children and grandchildren, by the children of those for whose sake I staked my life, and suffered innumerable hardships in 1812-13? The answer is with Ohio. We have resisted official coercion in Kentucky; let no power on earth tempt or drive you to bloody outrage now. Very truly your old friend, Leslie Coombs. --N. Y. Evening Post, May 7.
General Leslie Coombs, of Kentucky, writes to a friend in Cincinnati, under date of April 27, as follows:-- We could not control the Governor and his coconspirators, but we appealed to the people, and on next Saturday we expect to elect John J. Crittenden, James Guthrie, and others, to a brotherly peace conference--by a majority unparalleled heretofore in Kentucky. I shall not be surprised at fifty thousand. The destructionists, anticipating their fate, have recently resolved to abandon the contest. Then, in Heaven's name 1 let us alone — keep the peace on your side of the river, and we will give treason such a rebuke in Old Kentucky that it will never again dare to raise its hideous head among us. We cannot turn our Governor out of office till his term expires, and he is the military commander-in-chief of the State; but we can keep Kentucky in the Union--if you will let us. When a beardless boy, I left my father's home in Kentucky, and marched, with thousands of brav