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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Arlington House, on the Potomac, opposite Washington, is now the Headquarters of Gen. McDowell. The N. Y. 8th, Col. Lyons, is quartered there, with their battery of light artillery. The mansion is in the old Revolutionary style,--solid, wide-spread, and low. Gen. Lee left many pictures and relics of the Revolution. In the entry are the paintings of Revolutionary sons, painted in his old age by George Washington Custis. The dining-room is adorned with, among other things, three deer's heads, from deer actually killed by Washington. A fine engraving of the Duke of Wellington confronts a full-length oil painting of Light-horse Harry, the father of Gen. Lee. A few books and letters lie about, marked with the eminent names of Lee and Custis.--N. Y. Express, May 30.
George Washington Custis (search for this): chapter 397
of light artillery. The mansion is in the old Revolutionary style,--solid, wide-spread, and low. Gen. Lee left many pictures and relics of the Revolution. In the entry are the paintings of Revolutionary sons, painted in his old age by George Washington Custis. The dining-room is adorned with, among other things, three deer's heads, from deer actually killed by Washington. A fine engraving of the Duke of Wellington confronts a full-length oil painting of Light-horse Harry, the father of Gen.y pictures and relics of the Revolution. In the entry are the paintings of Revolutionary sons, painted in his old age by George Washington Custis. The dining-room is adorned with, among other things, three deer's heads, from deer actually killed by Washington. A fine engraving of the Duke of Wellington confronts a full-length oil painting of Light-horse Harry, the father of Gen. Lee. A few books and letters lie about, marked with the eminent names of Lee and Custis.--N. Y. Express, May 30.
Light-Horse Harry Lee (search for this): chapter 397
e N. Y. 8th, Col. Lyons, is quartered there, with their battery of light artillery. The mansion is in the old Revolutionary style,--solid, wide-spread, and low. Gen. Lee left many pictures and relics of the Revolution. In the entry are the paintings of Revolutionary sons, painted in his old age by George Washington Custis. The adorned with, among other things, three deer's heads, from deer actually killed by Washington. A fine engraving of the Duke of Wellington confronts a full-length oil painting of Light-horse Harry, the father of Gen. Lee. A few books and letters lie about, marked with the eminent names of Lee and Custis.--N. Y. Express, May 30. adorned with, among other things, three deer's heads, from deer actually killed by Washington. A fine engraving of the Duke of Wellington confronts a full-length oil painting of Light-horse Harry, the father of Gen. Lee. A few books and letters lie about, marked with the eminent names of Lee and Custis.--N. Y. Express, May 30.
Arlington House, on the Potomac, opposite Washington, is now the Headquarters of Gen. McDowell. The N. Y. 8th, Col. Lyons, is quartered there, with their battery of light artillery. The mansion is in the old Revolutionary style,--solid, wide-spread, and low. Gen. Lee left many pictures and relics of the Revolution. In the entry are the paintings of Revolutionary sons, painted in his old age by George Washington Custis. The dining-room is adorned with, among other things, three deer's heads, from deer actually killed by Washington. A fine engraving of the Duke of Wellington confronts a full-length oil painting of Light-horse Harry, the father of Gen. Lee. A few books and letters lie about, marked with the eminent names of Lee and Custis.--N. Y. Express, May 30.
Arlington House, on the Potomac, opposite Washington, is now the Headquarters of Gen. McDowell. The N. Y. 8th, Col. Lyons, is quartered there, with their battery of light artillery. The mansion is in the old Revolutionary style,--solid, wide-spread, and low. Gen. Lee left many pictures and relics of the Revolution. In the entry are the paintings of Revolutionary sons, painted in his old age by George Washington Custis. The dining-room is adorned with, among other things, three deer's heads, from deer actually killed by Washington. A fine engraving of the Duke of Wellington confronts a full-length oil painting of Light-horse Harry, the father of Gen. Lee. A few books and letters lie about, marked with the eminent names of Lee and Custis.--N. Y. Express, May 30.
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 397
Arlington House, on the Potomac, opposite Washington, is now the Headquarters of Gen. McDowell. The N. Y. 8th, Col. Lyons, is quartered there, with their battery of light artillery. The mansion is in the old Revolutionary style,--solid, wide-spread, and low. Gen. Lee left many pictures and relics of the Revolution. In the entry are the paintings of Revolutionary sons, painted in his old age by George Washington Custis. The dining-room is adorned with, among other things, three deer's heads, from deer actually killed by Washington. A fine engraving of the Duke of Wellington confronts a full-length oil painting of Light-horse Harry, the father of Gen. Lee. A few books and letters lie about, marked with the eminent names of Lee and Custis.--N. Y. Express, May 30.
George Washington (search for this): chapter 397
Arlington House, on the Potomac, opposite Washington, is now the Headquarters of Gen. McDowell. The N. Y. 8th, Col. Lyons, is quartered there, with their battery of light artillery. The mansion is in the old Revolutionary style,--solid, wide-spread, and low. Gen. Lee left many pictures and relics of the Revolution. In the entry are the paintings of Revolutionary sons, painted in his old age by George Washington Custis. The dining-room is adorned with, among other things, three deer's heads, from deer actually killed by Washington. A fine engraving of the Duke of Wellington confronts a full-length oil painting of Light-horse Harry, the father of Gen. Lee. A few books and letters lie about, marked with the eminent names of Lee and Custis.--N. Y. Express, May 30.
Arlington House, on the Potomac, opposite Washington, is now the Headquarters of Gen. McDowell. The N. Y. 8th, Col. Lyons, is quartered there, with their battery of light artillery. The mansion is in the old Revolutionary style,--solid, wide-spread, and low. Gen. Lee left many pictures and relics of the Revolution. In the entry are the paintings of Revolutionary sons, painted in his old age by George Washington Custis. The dining-room is adorned with, among other things, three deer's heads, from deer actually killed by Washington. A fine engraving of the Duke of Wellington confronts a full-length oil painting of Light-horse Harry, the father of Gen. Lee. A few books and letters lie about, marked with the eminent names of Lee and Custis.--N. Y. Express, May 30.