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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 19 total hits in 6 results.

Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 487
the Picayune's pedigree of Gen. Butler. --Under this heading, the Boston Courier publishes, as from the columns of this journal, the following paragraph:-- All the Massachusetts troops now in Washington are negroes, with the exception of two or three drummer-boys. Gen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readers may recollect old Ben, the barber, who kept a shop in Poydras street, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. And the Newburyport (Mass.) Herald does the same. We can scarcely imagine that the editors of either of those journals really believe that this paragraph was ever before printed in the Picayune. At all events, it never was.--N. O. Picayune, May 22.
Liberia (Liberia) (search for this): chapter 487
he Boston Courier publishes, as from the columns of this journal, the following paragraph:-- All the Massachusetts troops now in Washington are negroes, with the exception of two or three drummer-boys. Gen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readers may recollect old Ben, the barber, who kept a shop in Poydras street, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. And the Newburyport (Mass.) Herald does the same. We can scarcely imagine that theeption of two or three drummer-boys. Gen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readers may recollect old Ben, the barber, who kept a shop in Poydras street, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. And the Newburyport (Mass.) Herald does the same. We can scarcely imagine that the editors of either of those journals really believe that this paragraph was ever before printed in the Picayune. At all events, it never was.--N. O. Picayune, May 22.
Newburyport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 487
the Picayune's pedigree of Gen. Butler. --Under this heading, the Boston Courier publishes, as from the columns of this journal, the following paragraph:-- All the Massachusetts troops now in Washington are negroes, with the exception of two or three drummer-boys. Gen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readers may recollect old Ben, the barber, who kept a shop in Poydras street, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. And the Newburyport (Mass.) Herald does the same. We can scarcely imagine that the editors of either of those journals really believe that this paragraph was ever before printed in the Picayune. At all events, it never was.--N. O. Picayune, May 22.
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 487
the Picayune's pedigree of Gen. Butler. --Under this heading, the Boston Courier publishes, as from the columns of this journal, the following paragraph:-- All the Massachusetts troops now in Washington are negroes, with the exception of two or three drummer-boys. Gen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readers may recollect old Ben, the barber, who kept a shop in Poydras street, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. And the Newburyport (Mass.) Herald does the same. We can scarcely imagine that the editors of either of those journals really believe that this paragraph was ever before printed in the Picayune. At all events, it never was.--N. O. Picayune, May 22.
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 487
the Picayune's pedigree of Gen. Butler. --Under this heading, the Boston Courier publishes, as from the columns of this journal, the following paragraph:-- All the Massachusetts troops now in Washington are negroes, with the exception of two or three drummer-boys. Gen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readerGen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readers may recollect old Ben, the barber, who kept a shop in Poydras street, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. And the Newburyport (Mass.) Herald does the same. We can scarcely imagine that the editors of either of those journals really believe that this paragraph was ever before printed in tet, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. And the Newburyport (Mass.) Herald does the same. We can scarcely imagine that the editors of either of those journals really believe that this paragraph was ever before printed in the Picayune. At all events, it never was.--N. O. Picayune, May 22.
the Picayune's pedigree of Gen. Butler. --Under this heading, the Boston Courier publishes, as from the columns of this journal, the following paragraph:-- All the Massachusetts troops now in Washington are negroes, with the exception of two or three drummer-boys. Gen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readers may recollect old Ben, the barber, who kept a shop in Poydras street, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. And the Newburyport (Mass.) Herald does the same. We can scarcely imagine that the editors of either of those journals really believe that this paragraph was ever before printed in the Picayune. At all events, it never was.--N. O. Picayune, May 22.