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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 8 total hits in 4 results.

Lancaster (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 502
Gen. Twiggs and President Buchanan.--Gen. Twiggs, late of the United States Army, has addressed a letter to Ex-President Buchanan, in which he says:--Your usurped right to dismiss me from the army might be acquiesced in; but you had no right to brand me as a traitor. This was personal, and I shall treat it as such--not through the papers, but in person. I shall, most assuredly, pay a visit to Lancaster for the sole purpose of a personal interview with you. So, sir, prepare yourself. I am well assured that public opinion will sanction any course I may take with you. --Charleston Courier, May 18.
Gen. Twiggs and President Buchanan.--Gen. Twiggs, late of the United States Army, has addressed a letter to Ex-President Buchanan, in which he says:--Your usurped right to dismiss me from the army might be acquiesced in; but you had no right to brand me as a traitor. This was personal, and I shall treat it as such--not through the papers, but in person. I shall, most assuredly, pay a visit to Lancaster for the sole purpose of a personal interview with you. So, sir, prepare yourself. I am Gen. Twiggs, late of the United States Army, has addressed a letter to Ex-President Buchanan, in which he says:--Your usurped right to dismiss me from the army might be acquiesced in; but you had no right to brand me as a traitor. This was personal, and I shall treat it as such--not through the papers, but in person. I shall, most assuredly, pay a visit to Lancaster for the sole purpose of a personal interview with you. So, sir, prepare yourself. I am well assured that public opinion will sanction any course I may take with you. --Charleston Courier, May 18.
James Buchanan (search for this): chapter 502
Gen. Twiggs and President Buchanan.--Gen. Twiggs, late of the United States Army, has addressed a letter to Ex-President Buchanan, in which he says:--Your usurped right to dismiss me from the army might be acquiesced in; but you had no right to brand me as a traitor. This was personal, and I shall treat it as such--not through the papers, but in person. I shall, most assuredly, pay a visit to Lancaster for the sole purpose of a personal interview with you. So, sir, prepare yourself. I am wo Ex-President Buchanan, in which he says:--Your usurped right to dismiss me from the army might be acquiesced in; but you had no right to brand me as a traitor. This was personal, and I shall treat it as such--not through the papers, but in person. I shall, most assuredly, pay a visit to Lancaster for the sole purpose of a personal interview with you. So, sir, prepare yourself. I am well assured that public opinion will sanction any course I may take with you. --Charleston Courier, May 18.
Gen. Twiggs and President Buchanan.--Gen. Twiggs, late of the United States Army, has addressed a letter to Ex-President Buchanan, in which he says:--Your usurped right to dismiss me from the army might be acquiesced in; but you had no right to brand me as a traitor. This was personal, and I shall treat it as such--not through the papers, but in person. I shall, most assuredly, pay a visit to Lancaster for the sole purpose of a personal interview with you. So, sir, prepare yourself. I am well assured that public opinion will sanction any course I may take with you. --Charleston Courier, May 18.