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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 506
endorsing their acts; can you wantonly abandon your country, by forming an alliance with a Northern lady? * * * * Here you are offered rank, honor, station, and everlasting employ; whilst the cold-hearted Northerners will even refuse you, (employ.) Answer in haste; and if you need funds to almost any amount, fail not to let me know. I will have you supplied by Southern friends at Portland. In haste, yours truly, J. P. Benjamin, Atty-Gen'l, C. S. A. To Capt. C. Lee Moses, Saco, Me. Montgomery, April 9, 1861. old Orchard House, Saco, me., April 17, 1861. Mr. J. P. Benjamin: Sir:--Your letter of the 9th has been received, and I wish you and Mr. Mallory to distinctly understand that I hold no conference with traitors. The banner stamped upon this slip of paper is my adoration; it has real beauty; God bless it now and forever; and curses upon him who tramples upon it in the absence of manliness to protect it. I am and have been since last October the husband of a Saco lad
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 506
:-- dear Sir:--I am requested by Secretary Mallory to indite you a few lines soliciting your acceptance of a commission, commanding in the Confederate Navy of America; your pay to go on from the late of secession of your native State, (South Carolina.) Your high capabilities and qualifications as a seaman and navigator, and knowledge in angles, &c., &c., and associations of your honorable family, proclaim you to be a man of honor, consequently adhering to the great fundamental law of natur is my adoration; it has real beauty; God bless it now and forever; and curses upon him who tramples upon it in the absence of manliness to protect it. I am and have been since last October the husband of a Saco lady. * * * * * I was born il South Carolina, but, thank God, left it in my childhood days with all my family. I will take employ here before the mast, in preference to your highest encomiums. As a gentleman, I was in duty bound to reply to your letter; let it be your last to me. T
Portland (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 506
The Portland (Me.) Argus publishes the following correspondence:-- dear Sir:--I am requested by Secretary Mallory to indite you a few lines soliciting your acceptance of a commission, commanding in the Confederate Navy of America; your pay to go on from the late of secession of your native State, (South Carolina.) Your high capabilities and qualifications as a seaman and navigator, and knowledge in angles, &c., &c., and associations of your honorable family, proclaim you to be a man ohonor, station, and everlasting employ; whilst the cold-hearted Northerners will even refuse you, (employ.) Answer in haste; and if you need funds to almost any amount, fail not to let me know. I will have you supplied by Southern friends at Portland. In haste, yours truly, J. P. Benjamin, Atty-Gen'l, C. S. A. To Capt. C. Lee Moses, Saco, Me. Montgomery, April 9, 1861. old Orchard House, Saco, me., April 17, 1861. Mr. J. P. Benjamin: Sir:--Your letter of the 9th has been receive
Saco (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 506
(employ.) Answer in haste; and if you need funds to almost any amount, fail not to let me know. I will have you supplied by Southern friends at Portland. In haste, yours truly, J. P. Benjamin, Atty-Gen'l, C. S. A. To Capt. C. Lee Moses, Saco, Me. Montgomery, April 9, 1861. old Orchard House, Saco, me., April 17, 1861. Mr. J. P. Benjamin: Sir:--Your letter of the 9th has been received, and I wish you and Mr. Mallory to distinctly understand that I hold no conference with traitorSaco, me., April 17, 1861. Mr. J. P. Benjamin: Sir:--Your letter of the 9th has been received, and I wish you and Mr. Mallory to distinctly understand that I hold no conference with traitors. The banner stamped upon this slip of paper is my adoration; it has real beauty; God bless it now and forever; and curses upon him who tramples upon it in the absence of manliness to protect it. I am and have been since last October the husband of a Saco lady. * * * * * I was born il South Carolina, but, thank God, left it in my childhood days with all my family. I will take employ here before the mast, in preference to your highest encomiums. As a gentleman, I was in duty bound to reply
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 506
The Portland (Me.) Argus publishes the following correspondence:-- dear Sir:--I am requested by Secretary Mallory to indite you a few lines soliciting your acceptance of a commission, commanding in the Confederate Navy of America; your pay to go on from the late of secession of your native State, (South Carolina.) Your high capabilities and qualifications as a seaman and navigator, and knowledge in angles, &c., &c., and associations of your honorable family, proclaim you to be a man of honor, consequently adhering to the great fundamental law of nature — home first, the cause of your own hearth-side before that of strangers. But worse than all, these strangers have waged war against us, and you are abiding with them — thus endorsing their acts; can you wantonly abandon your country, by forming an alliance with a Northern lady? * * * * Here you are offered rank, honor, station, and everlasting employ; whilst the cold-hearted Northerners will even refuse you, (employ.) An
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 506
The Portland (Me.) Argus publishes the following correspondence:-- dear Sir:--I am requested by Secretary Mallory to indite you a few lines soliciting your acceptance of a commission, commanding in the Confederate Navy of America; your pay to go on from the late of secession of your native State, (South Carolina.) Your high capabilities and qualifications as a seaman and navigator, and knowledge in angles, &c., &c., and associations of your honorable family, proclaim you to be a man of honor, consequently adhering to the great fundamental law of nature — home first, the cause of your own hearth-side before that of strangers. But worse than all, these strangers have waged war against us, and you are abiding with them — thus endorsing their acts; can you wantonly abandon your country, by forming an alliance with a Northern lady? * * * * Here you are offered rank, honor, station, and everlasting employ; whilst the cold-hearted Northerners will even refuse you, (employ.) An
J. P. Benjamin (search for this): chapter 506
ste; and if you need funds to almost any amount, fail not to let me know. I will have you supplied by Southern friends at Portland. In haste, yours truly, J. P. Benjamin, Atty-Gen'l, C. S. A. To Capt. C. Lee Moses, Saco, Me. Montgomery, April 9, 1861. old Orchard House, Saco, me., April 17, 1861. Mr. J. P. Benjamin: SMr. J. P. Benjamin: Sir:--Your letter of the 9th has been received, and I wish you and Mr. Mallory to distinctly understand that I hold no conference with traitors. The banner stamped upon this slip of paper is my adoration; it has real beauty; God bless it now and forever; and curses upon him who tramples upon it in the absence of manliness to prote a gentleman, I was in duty bound to reply to your letter; let it be your last to me. The American Flag — long may she wave O'er the land of the free and the traitor's grave. C. Lee Moses, A Northern-made Sailor and Unionist. The Argus states that Captain Moses is a relative of Senator Benjamin.--N. Y Evening Post, May 18.
C. Lee Moses (search for this): chapter 506
ount, fail not to let me know. I will have you supplied by Southern friends at Portland. In haste, yours truly, J. P. Benjamin, Atty-Gen'l, C. S. A. To Capt. C. Lee Moses, Saco, Me. Montgomery, April 9, 1861. old Orchard House, Saco, me., April 17, 1861. Mr. J. P. Benjamin: Sir:--Your letter of the 9th has been receis a gentleman, I was in duty bound to reply to your letter; let it be your last to me. The American Flag — long may she wave O'er the land of the free and the traitor's grave. C. Lee Moses, A Northern-made Sailor and Unionist. The Argus states that Captain Moses is a relative of Senator Benjamin.--N. Y Evening Post, May 18. s a gentleman, I was in duty bound to reply to your letter; let it be your last to me. The American Flag — long may she wave O'er the land of the free and the traitor's grave. C. Lee Moses, A Northern-made Sailor and Unionist. The Argus states that Captain Moses is a relative of Senator Benjamin.--N. Y Evening Post, May 1
The Portland (Me.) Argus publishes the following correspondence:-- dear Sir:--I am requested by Secretary Mallory to indite you a few lines soliciting your acceptance of a commission, commanding in the Confederate Navy of America; your pay to go on from the late of secession of your native State, (South Carolina.) Your high capabilities and qualifications as a seaman and navigator, and knowledge in angles, &c., &c., and associations of your honorable family, proclaim you to be a man uth Carolina, but, thank God, left it in my childhood days with all my family. I will take employ here before the mast, in preference to your highest encomiums. As a gentleman, I was in duty bound to reply to your letter; let it be your last to me. The American Flag — long may she wave O'er the land of the free and the traitor's grave. C. Lee Moses, A Northern-made Sailor and Unionist. The Argus states that Captain Moses is a relative of Senator Benjamin.--N. Y Evening Post, May 18.
The Portland (Me.) Argus publishes the following correspondence:-- dear Sir:--I am requested by Secretary Mallory to indite you a few lines soliciting your acceptance of a commission, commanding in the Confederate Navy of America; your pay to go on from the late of secession of your native State, (South Carolina.) Your high capabilities and qualifications as a seaman and navigator, and knowledge in angles, &c., &c., and associations of your honorable family, proclaim you to be a man ly, J. P. Benjamin, Atty-Gen'l, C. S. A. To Capt. C. Lee Moses, Saco, Me. Montgomery, April 9, 1861. old Orchard House, Saco, me., April 17, 1861. Mr. J. P. Benjamin: Sir:--Your letter of the 9th has been received, and I wish you and Mr. Mallory to distinctly understand that I hold no conference with traitors. The banner stamped upon this slip of paper is my adoration; it has real beauty; God bless it now and forever; and curses upon him who tramples upon it in the absence of manline
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