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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
rity of the battle was greater than that of Bull Run, and even Stonewall Jackson, in his retreat, declared to the country folks as he passed that he never had seen such fighting before. It was indeed terrific to behold, and I am told by one of the officers who mingled in the thickest of the fight, and who was himself through all the Crimean war, that he had never seen so terrible a fight. The number of surgeons was insufficient to attend to the wounded. Our experience was similar in North-Carolina, and a deficiency in the surgical department has been felt in every quarter of the army, whenever a large number of wounded fall in battle. Among those whom we have of the enemy's dead, the highest in rank is a major. Four wounded officers are prisoners; one of them has both eyes shot out. Hundreds of the enemy's muskets were taken, of every variety, from the very finest to altered flintlocks. Those who fought were all Virginians except an Irish regiment, who are said to have thrown
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
e number of wounded fall in battle. Among those whom we have of the enemy's dead, the highest in rank is a major. Four wounded officers are prisoners; one of them has both eyes shot out. Hundreds of the enemy's muskets were taken, of every variety, from the very finest to altered flintlocks. Those who fought were all Virginians except an Irish regiment, who are said to have thrown down their arms twice and to have taken them again when Gen. Jackson ordered them to be fired into. Richmond, Va., Whig account. this battle is called by the rebels, the battle of Kerns town. The subjoined account of Gen. Jackson's brilliant encounter with the enemy in the lower valley of Virginia should have reached us several days ago. It is from a distinguished and thoroughly reliable source, and we give it insertion, notwithstanding much of the information it imparts has been anticipated. Staunton, March 31. To the Editor of the Whig: I send you such particulars as I have been able to
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
lunteers upon their gallantry in the recent severe and brilliant action at Winchester. Their bearing upon that occasion, under the formidable attack of a bold and desperate foe, was worthy of the high reputation already won by the soldiers of Pennsylvania on the memorable fields of Dranesville, Roanoke Island, and Newbern. The Governor is proud to recognise the enviable distinction thus gained by the troops of the commonwealth, and trusts that to the end of the present wicked rebellion they ma men of his command, who there gave their lives a willing sacrifice to their country, must stimulate all who have enlisted in her service to increased devotion, while their memory will be cherished by every patriot and add honor to the arms of Pennsylvania and the Union. The Governor directs that Winchester, twenty-third of March, 1862, be inscribed on the flags of the Eighty-fourth and One hundred and tenth regiments, and that this order be read at the head of all the regiments of Pennsylvan
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
r. Headquarters P. M., Harrisburgh, April 4, 1862. General order, No. 20. The Governor congratulates the members of the Eighty-fourth and One hundred and tenth regiments Pennsylvania Volunteers upon their gallantry in the recent severe and brilliant action at Winchester. Their bearing upon that occasion, under the formidable attack of a bold and desperate foe, was worthy of the high reputation already won by the soldiers of Pennsylvania on the memorable fields of Dranesville, Roanoke Island, and Newbern. The Governor is proud to recognise the enviable distinction thus gained by the troops of the commonwealth, and trusts that to the end of the present wicked rebellion they may be distinguished by similar deeds of valor and endurance, and that, whenever called to meet the enemies of their country, they may prove their fitness to sustain its flag. The example of the gallant Colonel Murray, of the Eighty-fourth, who fell at the head of his regiment in the conflict at Winche
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 106
men and one horse. During the fight Gen. Shields continued to give his orders as if nothing had happened, and in reply to an officer who asked, You are hit, General, are you not? he said, Yes, I am, but say nothing of it, and he continued to issue his commands with firmness and apparent unconcern, until the severity of his wound caused faintness, and he was necessarily removed from the field. Four times has the General now received wounds which have endangered his life--three times in Mexico, and now again. From early morning our pickets were engaged with the cavalry of the enemy, who rode up and down, in the woods and on the road, shooting at our men both from the saddle and dismounted. The firing brought out our artillery again to the position where the enemy had commenced to harass our pickets. The whole battle was conducted by General Shields, who issued his orders from his sick-room, two miles distant, at his headquarters in Winchester. The artillery, who had enca
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
icent regiment, and vastly superior to our own it must be acknowledged. Of these forces two hundred prisoners were taken, seized near the enemy's right wing by our Michigan cavalry, under Col. Broadhead. Ambulances were bringing in the wounded all the night and day, and of the enemy, those who were not taken off the field amounted to one hundred and fifty wounded. Not less than three hundred of the enemy were killed. Many have said that the severity of the battle was greater than that of Bull Run, and even Stonewall Jackson, in his retreat, declared to the country folks as he passed that he never had seen such fighting before. It was indeed terrific to behold, and I am told by one of the officers who mingled in the thickest of the fight, and who was himself through all the Crimean war, that he had never seen so terrible a fight. The number of surgeons was insufficient to attend to the wounded. Our experience was similar in North-Carolina, and a deficiency in the surgical depart
Luray (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
ascertained that the enemy under Jackson was strongly posted near that place, and in direct communication with a force at Luray and another at Washington. It became important, therefore, to draw him from his position and supporting force if possiblt I had rightly divined the intentions of our crafty antagonist. On the morning of the twenty-third a reenforcement from Luray of five thousand reached Front Royal, on their way to join Jackson. This reenforcement was being followed by another bod ascertained that the enemy under Jackson was strongly posted near that place, and in communication with a large force at Luray and Washington. He deemed it important to draw him from his position and supporting force if possible. To effect this, the intentions of his crafty antagonist, for on the morning of the twenty-third a reenforcement of five thousand men from Luray reached Front Royal, on their way to join Jackson. This reinforcement was being followed by another body of ten thousand
Edinburgh (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 106
; H. M. McQuiston, wounded; D. O'Connor, wounded; P. Tenny, wounded; Archibald Wise, missing. Co. I--James Bliss, killed; Lieut. Samuel McClelland, wounded; Sergeant A. J. Kelley, wounded; Richard Phillips, wounded; T. B. Danon, wounded; Wm. Birch, wounded; Henry Clemens, wounded. Sergeant-Major J. P. Webb and A. J. Kelly, were mortally wounded and died on the night of the twenty-seventh. Report to Governor Morton. headquarters Third brigade, Gen. Shields' division, camp near Edinburgh, April 10, 1862. To His Excellency the Hon. O. P. Morton, Indianapolis, Indiana: sir: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Indiana troops under my command in the engagement at Winchester, on the twenty-third of March, 1862. Owing to the constant movement of our forces, I have been compelled to delay this report until now. The Seventh Indiana infantry formed a part of the Third brigade of Gen. Shields' division and at the time, was under the command
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
eport of the battle which was fought near Winchester, Va., on Sunday, the twenty-third inst., betwee enemy commenced the attack, advancing from Kernstown, and occupying a position with their batterinced to a position commanding the village of Kernstown and the wood on the right. The Fourteenth-Camp on your staff, I left headquarters for Kernstown, and assisted Colonels Kimball, Tyler, and Soned on a hill almost one half mile west of Kernstown, which latter place is intersected by the tuire of one of the Ohio batteries placed near Kernstown to defend the pike, and they were necessitat division of Gen. Banks's corps d'armee left Winchester for Centreville by the way of Berryville, onm, two miles distant, at his headquarters in Winchester. The artillery, who had encamped near thethat Manassas was child's play compared with Winchester, and from the fact that the loss on our sideespective commands. Reliable advices from Winchester represent the loss of the enemy in killed at[50 more...]
Petersville (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 106
was the first to come to their assistance, who engaged in a promiscuous fight with the enemy until the arrival of the full reinforcement of Gen. Shields' division, already enumerated, who immediately were put in line of battle, extending from a point a short distance to the left of the Strasburg turnpike, to a point two miles distant upon the right. The position chosen by our forces was nearly a mile from the rebel batteries, which they had posted upon the hills near the little town of Kernsville, like our own troops, mostly at the right-hand side of the road, a few guns only being posted upon the left. Tyler's brigade had the right wing, Kimball commanded the middle, and Sullivan the left wing. All of them were protected from the fire of the enemy by the intervening hills, upon which were placed our artillery, confronting the rebel batteries upon the top of the opposite hills, with about a mile distance between them. The cavalry was disposed in squadrons in reserve. There is
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