hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 466 0 Browse Search
Doc 320 0 Browse Search
W. T. Sherman 206 6 Browse Search
A. H. Foote 201 9 Browse Search
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) 185 3 Browse Search
A. E. Burnside 176 4 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 169 5 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 167 9 Browse Search
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 162 10 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 156 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 40 total hits in 15 results.

1 2
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 107
, and a ditch was dug around the graves to facilitate digging, and the bodies were again uncovered. The dead were all found buried with their faces downward, as a mark of foul indignity, and thus lay in one red burial blent. Poor fellows! the tears gushed from the eyes of the troopers as they reverently gazed upon their dead comrades in arms. The body of Capt. Tower was identified by Col. Arnold, who stood by the side of the grave, and who was one of the most earnest among all the saddened group in his endeavors to recognise his remains. It is a matter of congratulation that, guided by the directions of Messrs. Richardson and Clark, the precise locality of each of the remains recovered was satisfactorily determined, and it is to be regretted that the party who, as I am informed, left Rhode Island for the purpose of identifying the remains of Lieut. Prescott, failed for some reason, to join this expedition, and consequently no guide was at hand to aid in finding his remains.
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 107
Doc. 104.-the Exhumation at Bull Run. A correspondent of the Belvidere Press, who accompanied Gov. Sprague to the field of Bull Run, to recover the mortal remains of those gallant Rhode Islanders who there found their graves, gives the following graphic description of some of the sorrowful scenes the party witnessed: The Bull Run, to recover the mortal remains of those gallant Rhode Islanders who there found their graves, gives the following graphic description of some of the sorrowful scenes the party witnessed: The cavalry pushed on over the Warrenton turnpike, while the Governor and staff went down to the memorable bridge where the Second battery were obliged to leave their guns. The object of this visit was to see if any graves were thereabouts, as it was in the slaughter that occurred at this spot Capt. S. J. Smith is supposed to have lobrooks the horses waded and floundered, the mire was deep, and night had set in, but on went the little band, until the cavalcade emerged on the battle-ground of Bull Run. The tired horses, shivering and trembling, were picketed to the fences, and by the flaring candles, for no lanterns were to be obtained, the search was commenc
he vicinity of the battle-field, near the little house to the left of the church where Slocum and Ballou died, and in the garden of which they were interred. Mr. Richardson at once recognised the spot, and pointed out the graves of the heroes, and the preparations for exhuming were at once commenced, under the direction of Mr. Cof bushes, the blanket and shirt stripped from the body were floating in the current. The calico shirt, from its pattern and figure, was at once pronounced by Mr. Richardson, who nursed him in his last moments, to be that of Major Ballou, and not of Col. Slocum. After circumstances also proved that the ghouls had mistaken the objthe most earnest among all the saddened group in his endeavors to recognise his remains. It is a matter of congratulation that, guided by the directions of Messrs. Richardson and Clark, the precise locality of each of the remains recovered was satisfactorily determined, and it is to be regretted that the party who, as I am inform
William Sprague (search for this): chapter 107
Doc. 104.-the Exhumation at Bull Run. A correspondent of the Belvidere Press, who accompanied Gov. Sprague to the field of Bull Run, to recover the mortal remains of those gallant Rhode Islanders who there found their graves, gives the following graphic description of some of the sorrowful scenes the party witnessed: The cavalry pushed on over the Warrenton turnpike, while the Governor and staff went down to the memorable bridge where the Second battery were obliged to leave their guns. The object of this visit was to see if any graves were thereabouts, as it was in the slaughter that occurred at this spot Capt. S. J. Smith is supposed to have lost his life. But no sign of a grave could be discovered, no marks of a burial were discovered in the vicinity, and the bridge itself was blown up and destroyed. The party then crossed the fields to the fording place near Sudley Church, there went through the stream, and joined the cavalry in the vicinity of the battle-field, near th
hurch, there went through the stream, and joined the cavalry in the vicinity of the battle-field, near the little house to the left of the church where Slocum and Ballou died, and in the garden of which they were interred. Mr. Richardson at once recognised the spot, and pointed out the graves of the heroes, and the preparations fing in the current. The calico shirt, from its pattern and figure, was at once pronounced by Mr. Richardson, who nursed him in his last moments, to be that of Major Ballou, and not of Col. Slocum. After circumstances also proved that the ghouls had mistaken the object of their vengeance, and that the fate intended for the remains of Col. Slocum was received by those of the heroic and unfortunate Major Ballou. I write this with a trembling hand and a burning heart. I would have spared you the pain of such a narration, but a calm, clear version of this fiendish outrage must be given, and sensibility laid aside for the moment. The ashes and bones wer
es of the heroes, and the preparations for exhuming were at once commenced, under the direction of Mr. Coleman. During this time, the Governor, accompanied by Mr. Clark and the remainder of his staff, rode in search of the place where poor Tower lay. And now occurs an incident which I am almost afraid to pen. It causes a shuddercketed to the fences, and by the flaring candles, for no lanterns were to be obtained, the search was commenced for Capt. Tower at eight o'clock in the evening. Mr. Clark, by looking from a window in the house where he lay wounded on the day of the battle, and now occupied by Mr. Mathews, pointed out the spot where the Captain was among all the saddened group in his endeavors to recognise his remains. It is a matter of congratulation that, guided by the directions of Messrs. Richardson and Clark, the precise locality of each of the remains recovered was satisfactorily determined, and it is to be regretted that the party who, as I am informed, left Rhode Is
James Arnold (search for this): chapter 107
the remains. With uncovered heads, the body was laid in the burial-case, which in each case was marked with the name and date of disinterment. For the purpose of gleaning further intelligence about this horrible affair, the Governor and Col. Arnold visited the house from whence the colored girl had issued, and there conversed with the occupants, who corroborated every word the girl had said. Mr. Coleman also made inquiries at another house in the neighborhood, and held a long conversatidownward, as a mark of foul indignity, and thus lay in one red burial blent. Poor fellows! the tears gushed from the eyes of the troopers as they reverently gazed upon their dead comrades in arms. The body of Capt. Tower was identified by Col. Arnold, who stood by the side of the grave, and who was one of the most earnest among all the saddened group in his endeavors to recognise his remains. It is a matter of congratulation that, guided by the directions of Messrs. Richardson and Clark,
valry in the vicinity of the battle-field, near the little house to the left of the church where Slocum and Ballou died, and in the garden of which they were interred. Mr. Richardson at once recognisdings. Suddenly she came up by the side of the grave, and asked if they were not digging for Col. Slocum's body. On being answered in the affirmative, she said: You're too late. The Georgia regimeby Mr. Richardson, who nursed him in his last moments, to be that of Major Ballou, and not of Col. Slocum. After circumstances also proved that the ghouls had mistaken the object of their vengeance, and that the fate intended for the remains of Col. Slocum was received by those of the heroic and unfortunate Major Ballou. I write this with a trembling hand and a burning heart. I would have sd, wrapped in the blanket, were with the clothes laid carefully in the coffin. The body of Col. Slocum was discovered to be unmutilated. It was enveloped in his blanket, and had been contained in
S. J. Smith (search for this): chapter 107
Run, to recover the mortal remains of those gallant Rhode Islanders who there found their graves, gives the following graphic description of some of the sorrowful scenes the party witnessed: The cavalry pushed on over the Warrenton turnpike, while the Governor and staff went down to the memorable bridge where the Second battery were obliged to leave their guns. The object of this visit was to see if any graves were thereabouts, as it was in the slaughter that occurred at this spot Capt. S. J. Smith is supposed to have lost his life. But no sign of a grave could be discovered, no marks of a burial were discovered in the vicinity, and the bridge itself was blown up and destroyed. The party then crossed the fields to the fording place near Sudley Church, there went through the stream, and joined the cavalry in the vicinity of the battle-field, near the little house to the left of the church where Slocum and Ballou died, and in the garden of which they were interred. Mr. Richardso
chardson at once recognised the spot, and pointed out the graves of the heroes, and the preparations for exhuming were at once commenced, under the direction of Mr. Coleman. During this time, the Governor, accompanied by Mr. Clark and the remainder of his staff, rode in search of the place where poor Tower lay. And now occurs and Col. Arnold visited the house from whence the colored girl had issued, and there conversed with the occupants, who corroborated every word the girl had said. Mr. Coleman also made inquiries at another house in the neighborhood, and held a long conversation with a white woman on the premises, who had nursed our sick and wounded avors useless, she had saved a lock of his hair, and preserved it for his friends, who she was confident some day would appear, and this lock of hair she gave to Mr. Coleman. The men who performed this hellish deed were members of the Twenty-first Georgia regiment; and it will be remembered that it was the Georgia regiments that th
1 2